FMP Publications

Our publications are recorded in a searchable database since 2010, updates will be added regularly.

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References
Perspectives for sensitivity enhancement in proton-detected solid-state NMR of highly deuterated proteins by preserving water magnetization
Chevelkov, V., Xiang(*), S. Q., Giller(*), K., Becker(*), S., Lange, A.; Reif(*), B.
J. Biomol. NMR, 61:151-160
(2015)

Tags: Molecular Biophysics (Lange, A.)

Abstract: In this work, we show how the water flip-back approach that is widely employed in solution-state NMR can be adapted to proton-detected MAS solid-state NMR of highly deuterated proteins. The scheme allows to enhance the sensitivity of the experiment by decreasing the recovery time of the proton longitudinal magnetization. The method relies on polarization transfer from non-saturated water to the protein during the inter-scan delay.

Specific 13C labeling of leucine, valine and isoleucine methyl groups for unambiguous detection of long-range restraints in protein solid-state NMR studies
Fasshuber, H. K., Demers, J. P., Chevelkov, V., Giller(*), K., Becker(*), S.; Lange, A.
J Magn Reson, 252:10-19
(2015)

Tags: Molecular Biophysics (Lange, A.)

Abstract: Here we present an isotopic labeling strategy to easily obtain unambiguous long-range distance restraints in protein solid-state NMR studies. The method is based on the inclusion of two biosynthetic precursors in the bacterial growth medium, alpha-ketoisovalerate and alpha-ketobutyrate, leading to the production of leucine, valine and isoleucine residues that are exclusively (13)C labeled on methyl groups. The resulting spectral simplification facilitates the collection of distance restraints, the verification of carbon chemical shift assignments and the measurement of methyl group dynamics. This approach is demonstrated on the type-three secretion system needle of Shigella flexneri, where 49 methyl-methyl and methyl-nitrogen distance restraints including 10 unambiguous long-range distance restraints could be collected. By combining this labeling scheme with ultra-fast MAS and proton detection, the assignment of methyl proton chemical shifts was achieved.

Strategies for solid-state NMR investigations of supramolecular assemblies with large subunit sizes
Fricke, P., Chevelkov, V., Shi, C.; Lange, A.
J Magn Reson, 253:2-9
(2015)

Tags: Molecular Biophysics (Lange, A.)

Abstract: Solid-state NMR is a versatile tool to study structure and dynamics of insoluble and non-crystalline biopolymers. Supramolecular protein assemblies are formed by self-association of multiple copies of single small-sized proteins. Because of their high degree of local order, solid-state NMR spectra of such systems exhibit an unusually high level of resolution, rendering them an ideal target for solid-state NMR investigations. Recently, our group has solved the structure of one particular supramolecular assembly, the type-iii-secretion-system needle. The needle subunit comprises around 80 residues. Many interesting supramolecular assemblies with unknown structure have subunits larger in size, which requires development of tailored solid-state NMR strategies to address their structures. In this "Perspective" article, we provide a view on different approaches to enhance sensitivity and resolution in biological solid-state NMR with a focus on the possible application to supramolecular assemblies with large subunit sizes.

Atomic-resolution structure of cytoskeletal bactofilin by solid-state NMR
Shi, C., Fricke, P., Lin(*), L., Chevelkov, V., Wegstroth(*), M., Giller(*), K., Becker(*), S., Thanbichler(*), M.; Lange, A.
Sci Adv, 1:e1501087
(2015)

Tags: Molecular Biophysics (Lange, A.)

Abstract: Bactofilins are a recently discovered class of cytoskeletal proteins of which no atomic-resolution structure has been reported thus far. The bacterial cytoskeleton plays an essential role in a wide range of processes, including morphogenesis, cell division, and motility. Among the cytoskeletal proteins, the bactofilins are bacteria-specific and do not have a eukaryotic counterpart. The bactofilin BacA of the species Caulobacter crescentus is not amenable to study by x-ray crystallography or solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) because of its inherent noncrystallinity and insolubility. We present the atomic structure of BacA calculated from solid-state NMR-derived distance restraints. We show that the core domain of BacA forms a right-handed beta helix with six windings and a triangular hydrophobic core. The BacA structure was determined to 1.0 A precision (heavy-atom root mean square deviation) on the basis of unambiguous restraints derived from four-dimensional (4D) HN-HN and 2D C-C NMR spectra.

Redox Regulation of Cell Contacts by Tricellulin and Occludin: Redox-Sensitive Cysteine Sites in Tricellulin Regulate Both Tri- and Bicellular Junctions in Tissue Barriers as Shown in Hypoxia and Ischemia
Cording, J., Günther, R., Vigolo(*), E., Tscheik, C., Winkler, L., Schlattner, I., Lorenz, D., Haseloff, R. F., Schmidt-Ott(*), K. M., Wolburg(*), H.; Blasig, I. E.
Antioxid Redox Signal, 23:1035-1049
(2015)

Tags: Molecular Cell Physiology (Blasig, I.E.)

Abstract: UNLABELLED: Tight junctions (TJs) seal paracellular clefts in epithelia/endothelia and form tissue barriers for proper organ function. TJ-associated marvel proteins (TAMPs; tricellulin, occludin, marvelD3) are thought to be relevant to regulation. Under normal conditions, tricellulin tightens tricellular junctions against macromolecules. Traces of tricellulin occur in bicellular junctions. AIMS: As pathological disturbances have not been analyzed, the structure and function of human tricellulin, including potentially redox-sensitive Cys sites, were investigated under reducing/oxidizing conditions at 3- and 2-cell contacts. RESULTS: Ischemia, hypoxia, and reductants redistributed tricellulin from 3- to 2-cell contacts. The extracellular loop 2 (ECL2; conserved Cys321, Cys335) trans-oligomerized between three opposing cells. Substitutions of these residues caused bicellular localization. Cys362 in transmembrane domain 4 contributed to bicellular heterophilic cis-interactions along the cell membrane with claudin-1 and marvelD3, while Cys395 in the cytosolic C-terminal tail promoted homophilic tricellullar cis-interactions. The Cys sites included in homo-/heterophilic bi-/tricellular cis-/trans-interactions contributed to cell barrier tightness for small/large molecules. INNOVATION: Tricellulin forms TJs via trans- and cis-association in 3-cell contacts, as demonstrated electron and quantified fluorescence microscopically; it tightens 3- and 2-cell contacts. Tricellulin's ECL2 specifically seals 3-cell contacts redox dependently; a structural model is proposed. CONCLUSIONS: TAMP ECL2 and claudins' ECL1 share functionally and structurally similar features involved in homo-/heterophilic tightening of cell-cell contacts. Tricellulin is a specific redox sensor and sealing element at 3-cell contacts and may compensate as a redox mediator for occludin loss at 2-cell contacts in vivo and in vitro. Molecular interaction mechanisms were proposed that contribute to tricellulin's function. In conclusion, tricellulin is a junctional redox regulator for ischemia-related alterations.

Phenothiazine-derived antipsychotic drugs inhibit dynamin and clathrin-mediated endocytosis
Daniel(*), J. A., Chau(*), N., Abdel-Hamid(*), M. K., Hu(*), L., von Kleist, L., Whiting(*), A., Krishnan(*), S., Maamary(*), P., Joseph(*), S. R., Simpson(*), F., Haucke, V., McCluskey(*), A.; Robinson(*), P. J.
Traffic, 16:635-654
(2015)

Tags: Molecular Pharmacology and Cell Biology (Haucke)

Abstract: Chlorpromazine is a phenothiazine-derived antipsychotic drug (APD) that inhibits clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) in cells by an unknown mechanism. We examined whether its action and that of other APDs might be mediated by the GTPase activity of dynamin. Eight of eight phenothiazine-derived APDs inhibited dynamin I (dynI) in the 2-12 microm range, the most potent being trifluoperazine (IC50 2.6 +/- 0.7 microm). They also inhibited dynamin II (dynII) at similar concentrations. Typical and atypical APDs not based on the phenothiazine scaffold were 8- to 10-fold less potent (haloperidol and clozapine) or were inactive (droperidol, olanzapine and risperidone). Kinetic analysis showed that phenothiazine-derived APDs were lipid competitive, while haloperidol was uncompetitive with lipid. Accordingly, phenothiazine-derived APDs inhibited dynI GTPase activity stimulated by lipids but not by various SH3 domains. All dynamin-active APDs also inhibited transferrin (Tfn) CME in cells at related potencies. Structure-activity relationships (SAR) revealed dynamin inhibition to be conferred by a substituent group containing a terminal tertiary amino group at the N2 position. Chlorpromazine was previously proposed to target AP-2 recruitment in the formation of clathrin-coated vesicles (CCV). However, neither chlorpromazine nor thioridazine affected AP-2 interaction with amphiphysin or clathrin. Super-resolution microscopy revealed that chlorpromazine blocks neither clathrin recruitment by AP-2, nor AP-2 recruitment, showing that CME inhibition occurs downstream of CCV formation. Overall, potent dynamin inhibition is a shared characteristic of phenothiazine-derived APDs, but not other typical or atypical APDs, and the data indicate that dynamin is their likely in-cell target in endocytosis.

Theta oscillations regulate the speed of locomotion via a hippocampus to lateral septum pathway
Bender, F., Gorbati, M., Cadavieco, M. C., Denisova, N., Gao, X., Holman, C., Korotkova, T.; Ponomarenko, A.
Nat Commun, 6:8521
(2015)

Tags: Behavioral Neurodynamics (Korotkova/Ponomarenko)

Abstract: Hippocampal theta oscillations support encoding of an animal's position during spatial navigation, yet longstanding questions about their impact on locomotion remain unanswered. Combining optogenetic control of hippocampal theta oscillations with electrophysiological recordings in mice, we show that hippocampal theta oscillations regulate locomotion. In particular, we demonstrate that their regularity underlies more stable and slower running speeds during exploration. More regular theta oscillations are accompanied by more regular theta-rhythmic spiking output of pyramidal cells. Theta oscillations are coordinated between the hippocampus and its main subcortical output, the lateral septum (LS). Chemo- or optogenetic inhibition of this pathway reveals its necessity for the hippocampal regulation of running speed. Moreover, theta-rhythmic stimulation of LS projections to the lateral hypothalamus replicates the reduction of running speed induced by more regular hippocampal theta oscillations. These results suggest that changes in hippocampal theta synchronization are translated into rapid adjustment of running speed via the LS.

Multifunctional reagents for quantitative proteome-wide analysis of protein modification in human cells and dynamic profiling of protein lipidation during vertebrate development
Broncel(*), M., Serwa(*), R. A., Ciepla(*), P., Krause, E., Dallman(*), M. J., Magee(*), A. I.; Tate(*), E. W.
Angew Chem Int Ed Engl, 54:5948-5951
(2015)

Tags: Mass Spectrometry (Krause, E.)

Abstract: Novel multifunctional reagents were applied in combination with a lipid probe for affinity enrichment of myristoylated proteins and direct detection of lipid-modified tryptic peptides by mass spectrometry. This method enables high-confidence identification of the myristoylated proteome on an unprecedented scale in cell culture, and allowed the first quantitative analysis of dynamic changes in protein lipidation during vertebrate embryonic development.

Myristoylation profiling in human cells and zebrafish
Broncel(*), M., Serwa(*), R. A., Ciepla(*), P., Krause, E., Dallman(*), M. J., Magee(*), A. I.; Tate(*), E. W.
Data Brief, 4:379-383
(2015)

Tags: Mass Spectrometry (Krause, E.)

Abstract: Human cells (HEK 293, HeLa, MCF-7) and zebrafish embryos were metabolically tagged with an alkynyl myristic acid probe, lysed with an SDS buffer and tagged proteomes ligated to multifunctional capture reagents via copper-catalyzed alkyne azide cycloaddition (CuAAC). This allowed for affinity enrichment and high-confidence identification, by delivering direct MS/MS evidence for the modification site, of 87 and 61 co-translationally myristoylated proteins in human cells and zebrafish, respectively. The data have been deposited to ProteomeXchange Consortium (Vizcaino et al., 2014 Nat. Biotechnol., 32, 223-6) (PXD001863 and PXD001876) and are described in detail in Multifunctional reagents for quantitative proteome-wide analysis of protein modification in human cells and dynamic protein lipidation during vertebrate development by Broncel et al., Angew. Chem. Int. Ed.

Simian hemorrhagic fever virus cell entry is dependent on CD163 and uses a clathrin-mediated endocytosis-like pathway
Cai(*), Y., Postnikova(*), E. N., Bernbaum(*), J. G., Yu(*), S. Q., Mazur(*), S., Deiuliis(*), N. M., Radoshitzky(*), S. R., Lackemeyer(*), M. G., McCluskey(*), A., Robinson(*), P. J., Haucke, V., Wahl-Jensen(*), V., Bailey(*), A. L., Lauck(*), M., Friedrich(*), T. C., O'Connor(*), D. H., Goldberg(*), T. L., Jahrling(*), P. B.; Kuhn(*), J. H.
J Virol, 89:844-856
(2015)

Tags: Molecular Pharmacology and Cell Biology (Haucke)

Abstract: UNLABELLED: Simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV) causes a severe and almost uniformly fatal viral hemorrhagic fever in Asian macaques but is thought to be nonpathogenic for humans. To date, the SHFV life cycle is almost completely uncharacterized on the molecular level. Here, we describe the first steps of the SHFV life cycle. Our experiments indicate that SHFV enters target cells by low-pH-dependent endocytosis. Dynamin inhibitors, chlorpromazine, methyl-beta-cyclodextrin, chloroquine, and concanamycin A dramatically reduced SHFV entry efficiency, whereas the macropinocytosis inhibitors EIPA, blebbistatin, and wortmannin and the caveolin-mediated endocytosis inhibitors nystatin and filipin III had no effect. Furthermore, overexpression and knockout study and electron microscopy results indicate that SHFV entry occurs by a dynamin-dependent clathrin-mediated endocytosis-like pathway. Experiments utilizing latrunculin B, cytochalasin B, and cytochalasin D indicate that SHFV does not hijack the actin polymerization pathway. Treatment of target cells with proteases (proteinase K, papain, alpha-chymotrypsin, and trypsin) abrogated entry, indicating that the SHFV cell surface receptor is a protein. Phospholipases A2 and D had no effect on SHFV entry. Finally, treatment of cells with antibodies targeting CD163, a cell surface molecule identified as an entry factor for the SHFV-related porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, diminished SHFV replication, identifying CD163 as an important SHFV entry component. IMPORTANCE: Simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV) causes highly lethal disease in Asian macaques resembling human illness caused by Ebola or Lassa virus. However, little is known about SHFV's ecology and molecular biology and the mechanism by which it causes disease. The results of this study shed light on how SHFV enters its target cells. Using electron microscopy and inhibitors for various cellular pathways, we demonstrate that SHFV invades cells by low-pH-dependent, actin-independent endocytosis, likely with the help of a cellular surface protein.

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Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (FMP)
Campus Berlin-Buch
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13125 Berlin, Germany
+4930 94793 - 100 
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info(at)fmp-berlin.de

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