FMP Publications

Our publications are recorded in a searchable database since 2010, updates will be added regularly.

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References
Ultrafast Magic-Angle Spinning: Benefits for the Acquisition of Ultrawide-Line NMR Spectra of Heavy Spin-1/2 Nuclei
Pöppler, A. C., Demers, J. P., Malon(*), M., Singh(*), A. P., Roesky(*), H. W., Nishiyama(*), Y.; Lange, A.
Chemphyschem, 17:812-816
(2016)

Tags: Molecular Biophysics (Lange, A.)

Abstract: The benefits of the ultrafast magic-angle spinning (MAS) approach for the acquisition of ultrawide-line NMR spectra-spectral simplification, increased mass sensitivity allowing the fast study of small amounts of material, efficient excitation, and application to multiple heavy nuclei-are demonstrated for tin(II) oxide (SnO) and the tin complex [(LB)Sn(II) Cl](+) [Sn(II) Cl3 ](-) [LB=2,6-diacetylpyridinebis(2,6-diisopropylanil)] containing two distinct tin environments. The ultrafast MAS experiments provide optimal conditions for the extraction of the chemical-shift anisotropy tensor parameters, anisotropy, and asymmetry for heavy spin-1/2 nuclei.

Active zone scaffolds differentially accumulate Unc13 isoforms to tune Ca(2+) channel-vesicle coupling
Böhme(*), M. A., Beis(*), C., Reddy-Alla(*), S., Reynolds(*), E., Mampell(*), M. M., Grasskamp, A. T., Lutzkendorf(*), J., Bergeron(*), D. D., Driller(*), J. H., Babikir(*), H., Göttfert(*), F., Robinson(*), I. M., O'Kane(*), C. J., Hell(*), S. W., Wahl(*), M. C., Stelzl(*), U., Loll(*), B., Walter, A. M.; Sigrist(*), S. J.
Nat Neurosci, 19:1311-1320
(2016)

Tags: Molecular and Theoretical Neuroscience (Walter)

Abstract: Brain function relies on fast and precisely timed synaptic vesicle (SV) release at active zones (AZs). Efficacy of SV release depends on distance from SV to Ca(2+) channel, but molecular mechanisms controlling this are unknown. Here we found that distances can be defined by targeting two unc-13 (Unc13) isoforms to presynaptic AZ subdomains. Super-resolution and intravital imaging of developing Drosophila melanogaster glutamatergic synapses revealed that the Unc13B isoform was recruited to nascent AZs by the scaffolding proteins Syd-1 and Liprin-alpha, and Unc13A was positioned by Bruchpilot and Rim-binding protein complexes at maturing AZs. Unc13B localized 120 nm away from Ca(2+) channels, whereas Unc13A localized only 70 nm away and was responsible for docking SVs at this distance. Unc13A(null) mutants suffered from inefficient, delayed and EGTA-supersensitive release. Mathematical modeling suggested that synapses normally operate via two independent release pathways differentially positioned by either isoform. We identified isoform-specific Unc13-AZ scaffold interactions regulating SV-Ca(2+)-channel topology whose developmental tightening optimizes synaptic transmission.

Structural basis for the dissociation of alpha-synuclein fibrils triggered by pressure perturbation of the hydrophobic core
de Oliveira(*), G. A., Marques(*), M. A., Cruzeiro-Silva(*), C., Cordeiro(*), Y., Schuabb(*), C., Moraes(*), A. H., Winter(*), R., Oschkinat, H., Foguel(*), D., Freitas(*), M. S.; Silva(*), J. L.
Sci Rep, 6:37990
(2016)

Tags: NMR-Supported Structural Biology (Oschkinat)

Abstract: Parkinson's disease is a neurological disease in which aggregated forms of the alpha-synuclein (alpha-syn) protein are found. We used high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) coupled with NMR spectroscopy to study the dissociation of alpha-syn fibril into monomers and evaluate their structural and dynamic properties. Different dynamic properties in the non-amyloid-beta component (NAC), which constitutes the Greek-key hydrophobic core, and in the acidic C-terminal region of the protein were identified by HHP NMR spectroscopy. In addition, solid-state NMR revealed subtle differences in the HHP-disturbed fibril core, providing clues to how these species contribute to seeding alpha-syn aggregation. These findings show how pressure can populate so far undetected alpha-syn species, and they lay out a roadmap for fibril dissociation via pathways not previously observed using other approaches. Pressure perturbs the cavity-prone hydrophobic core of the fibrils by pushing water inward, thereby inducing the dissociation into monomers. Our study offers the molecular details of how hydrophobic interaction and the formation of water-excluded cavities jointly contribute to the assembly and stabilization of the fibrils. Understanding the molecular forces behind the formation of pathogenic fibrils uncovered by pressure perturbation will aid in the development of new therapeutics against Parkinson's disease.

Insight into the Modification of Polymeric Micellar and Liposomal Nanocarriers by Fluorescein-Labeled Lipids and Uptake-Mediating Lipopeptides
Draffehn(*), S., Eichhorst, J., Wiesner, B.; Kumke(*), M. U.
Langmuir, 32:6928-6939
(2016)

Tags: Cellular Imaging (Wiesner)

Abstract: Encapsulation of diagnostic and therapeutic compounds in transporters improves their delivery to the point of need. An even more efficient treatment of diseases can be achieved using carriers with targeting or protecting moieties. In the present work, we investigated micellar and liposomal nanocarriers modified with fluorescein, peptides, and polymers that are covalently bound to fatty acids or phospholipids to ensure a self-driven incorporation into the micelles or liposomes. First, we characterized the photophysics of the fluorescent probes in the absence and in the presence of nanocarriers. Changes in the fluorescence decay time, quantum yield, and intensity of a fluorescein-labeled fatty acid (fluorescein-labeled palmitic acid [fPA]) and a fluorescein-labeled lipopeptide (P2fA2) were found. By exploiting these changes, we investigated a lipopeptide (P2A2 as an uptake-mediating unit) in combination with different nanocarriers (micelles and liposomes) and determined the corresponding association constant Kass values, which were found to be very high. In addition, the mobility of fPA was exploited using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and fluorescence depolarization (FD) experiments to characterize the nanocarriers. Cellular uptake experiments with mouse brain endothelial cells provided information on the uptake behavior of liposomes modified by uptake-mediating P2A2 and revealed differences in the uptake behavior between pH-sensitive and pH-insensitive liposomes.

X-exome sequencing of 405 unresolved families identifies seven novel intellectual disability genes
Hu(*), H., Haas(*), S. A., Chelly(*), J., Van Esch(*), H., Raynaud(*), M., de Brouwer(*), A. P., Weinert, S., Froyen(*), G., Frints(*), S. G., Laumonnier, F., Zemojtel(*), T., Love(*), M. I., Richard(*), H., Emde(*), A. K., Bienek(*), M., Jensen(*), C., Hambrock(*), M., Fischer(*), U., Langnick(*), C., Feldkamp(*), M., Wissink-Lindhout(*), W., Lebrun(*), N., Castelnau(*), L., Rucci(*), J., Montjean(*), R., Dorseuil(*), O., Billuart(*), P., Stuhlmann, T., Shaw(*), M., Corbett(*), M. A., Gardner(*), A., Willis-Owen(*), S., Tan(*), C., Friend(*), K. L., Belet(*), S., van Roozendaal(*), K. E., Jimenez-Pocquet(*), M., Moizard(*), M. P., Ronce(*), N., Sun(*), R., O'Keeffe(*), S., Chenna(*), R., van Bommel(*), A., Goke(*), J., Hackett(*), A., Field(*), M., Christie(*), L., Boyle(*), J., Haan(*), E., Nelson(*), J., Turner(*), G., Baynam(*), G., Gillessen-Kaesbach(*), G., Müller, U., Steinberger(*), D., Budny(*), B., Badura-Stronka(*), M., Latos-Bielenska(*), A., Ousager(*), L. B., Wieacker(*), P., Rodriguez Criado(*), G., Bondeson(*), M. L., Anneren(*), G., Dufke(*), A., Cohen(*), M., Van Maldergem(*), L., Vincent-Delorme(*), C., Echenne(*), B., Simon-Bouy(*), B., Kleefstra(*), T., Willemsen(*), M., Fryns(*), J. P., Devriendt(*), K., Ullmann(*), R., Vingron(*), M., Wrogemann(*), K., Wienker(*), T. F., Tzschach(*), A., van Bokhoven(*), H., Gecz(*), J., Jentsch, T. J., Chen(*), W., Ropers(*), H. H.; Kalscheuer(*), V. M.
Molecular psychiatry, 21:133-148
(2016)

Tags: Physiology and Pathology of Ion Transport (Jentsch

Abstract: X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder. During the past two decades in excess of 100 X-chromosome ID genes have been identified. Yet, a large number of families mapping to the X-chromosome remained unresolved suggesting that more XLID genes or loci are yet to be identified. Here, we have investigated 405 unresolved families with XLID. We employed massively parallel sequencing of all X-chromosome exons in the index males. The majority of these males were previously tested negative for copy number variations and for mutations in a subset of known XLID genes by Sanger sequencing. In total, 745 X-chromosomal genes were screened. After stringent filtering, a total of 1297 non-recurrent exonic variants remained for prioritization. Co-segregation analysis of potential clinically relevant changes revealed that 80 families (20%) carried pathogenic variants in established XLID genes. In 19 families, we detected likely causative protein truncating and missense variants in 7 novel and validated XLID genes (CLCN4, CNKSR2, FRMPD4, KLHL15, LAS1L, RLIM and USP27X) and potentially deleterious variants in 2 novel candidate XLID genes (CDK16 and TAF1). We show that the CLCN4 and CNKSR2 variants impair protein functions as indicated by electrophysiological studies and altered differentiation of cultured primary neurons from Clcn4(-/-) mice or after mRNA knock-down. The newly identified and candidate XLID proteins belong to pathways and networks with established roles in cognitive function and intellectual disability in particular. We suggest that systematic sequencing of all X-chromosomal genes in a cohort of patients with genetic evidence for X-chromosome locus involvement may resolve up to 58% of Fragile X-negative cases.

Modulation of Hexadecyl-LPA-Mediated Activation of Mast Cells and Microglia by a Chemical Probe for LPA5
Kozian(*), D. H., von Haeften(*), E., Joho(*), S., Czechtizky(*), W., Anumala, U. R., Roux(*), P., Dudda(*), A., Evers(*), A.; Nazare, M.
Chembiochem, 17:861-865
(2016)

Tags: Medicinal Chemistry (Nazare)

Abstract: Mast cells and microglia play a critical role in innate immunity and inflammation and can be activated by a wide range of endogenous and exogenous stimuli. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) has recently been reported to activate mast cells and microglia. Using the human mast cell line HMC-1 and the mouse microglia cell line BV-2, we show that LPA-mediated activation can be prevented by blockade of the LPA receptor 5 (LPA5) in both cell lines. The identification of new LPA5-specific antagonists as tool compounds to probe and modulate the LPA5/LPA axis in relevant in vitro and in vivo assays should contribute to better understanding of the underlying role of LPAs in the development and progression of (neuro-) inflammatory diseases.

Structural analysis of a signal peptide inside the ribosome tunnel by DNP MAS NMR
Lange, S., Franks, W. T., Rajagopalan(*), N., Döring(*), K., Geiger, M. A., Linden, A., van Rossum, B. J., Kramer(*), G., Bukau(*), B.; Oschkinat, H.
Sci Adv, 2:e1600379
(2016)

Tags: NMR-Supported Structural Biology (Oschkinat), Molecular Biophysics (Lange, A.)

Abstract: Proteins are synthesized in cells by ribosomes and, in parallel, prepared for folding or targeting. While ribosomal protein synthesis is progressing, the nascent chain exposes amino-terminal signal sequences or transmembrane domains that mediate interactions with specific interaction partners, such as the signal recognition particle (SRP), the SecA-adenosine triphosphatase, or the trigger factor. These binding events can set the course for folding in the cytoplasm and translocation across or insertion into membranes. A distinction of the respective pathways depends largely on the hydrophobicity of the recognition sequence. Hydrophobic transmembrane domains stabilize SRP binding, whereas less hydrophobic signal sequences, typical for periplasmic and outer membrane proteins, stimulate SecA binding and disfavor SRP interactions. In this context, the formation of helical structures of signal peptides within the ribosome was considered to be an important factor. We applied dynamic nuclear polarization magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance to investigate the conformational states of the disulfide oxidoreductase A (DsbA) signal peptide stalled within the exit tunnel of the ribosome. Our results suggest that the nascent chain comprising the DsbA signal sequence adopts an extended structure in the ribosome with only minor populations of helical structure.

De novo and inherited mutations in the X-linked gene CLCN4 are associated with syndromic intellectual disability and behavior and seizure disorders in males and females
Palmer(*), E. E., Stuhlmann, T., Weinert, S., Haan(*), E., Van Esch(*), H., Holvoet(*), M., Boyle(*), J., Leffler(*), M., Raynaud(*), M., Moraine(*), C., van Bokhoven(*), H., Kleefstra(*), T., Kahrizi(*), K., Najmabadi(*), H., Ropers(*), H. H., Delgado(*), M. R., Sirsi(*), D., Golla(*), S., Sommer(*), A., Pietryga(*), M. P., Chung(*), W. K., Wynn(*), J., Rohena(*), L., Bernardo(*), E., Hamlin(*), D., Faux(*), B. M., Grange(*), D. K., Manwaring(*), L., Tolmie(*), J., Joss(*), S., Cobben(*), J. M., Duijkers(*), F. A., Goehringer(*), J. M., Challman(*), T. D., Hennig(*), F., Fischer(*), U., Grimme(*), A., Suckow(*), V., Musante(*), L., Nicholl(*), J., Shaw(*), M., Lodh(*), S. P., Niu(*), Z., Rosenfeld(*), J. A., Stankiewicz(*), P., Jentsch, T. J., Gecz(*), J., Field(*), M.; Kalscheuer(*), V. M.
Molecular psychiatry,
(2016)

Tags: Physiology and Pathology of Ion Transport (Jentsch)

Abstract: Variants in CLCN4, which encodes the chloride/hydrogen ion exchanger CIC-4 prominently expressed in brain, were recently described to cause X-linked intellectual disability and epilepsy. We present detailed phenotypic information on 52 individuals from 16 families with CLCN4-related disorder: 5 affected females and 2 affected males with a de novo variant in CLCN4 (6 individuals previously unreported) and 27 affected males, 3 affected females and 15 asymptomatic female carriers from 9 families with inherited CLCN4 variants (4 families previously unreported). Intellectual disability ranged from borderline to profound. Behavioral and psychiatric disorders were common in both child- and adulthood, and included autistic features, mood disorders, obsessive-compulsive behaviors and hetero- and autoaggression. Epilepsy was common, with severity ranging from epileptic encephalopathy to well-controlled seizures. Several affected individuals showed white matter changes on cerebral neuroimaging and progressive neurological symptoms, including movement disorders and spasticity. Heterozygous females can be as severely affected as males. The variability of symptoms in females is not correlated with the X inactivation pattern studied in their blood. The mutation spectrum includes frameshift, missense and splice site variants and one single-exon deletion. All missense variants were predicted to affect CLCN4's function based on in silico tools and either segregated with the phenotype in the family or were de novo. Pathogenicity of all previously unreported missense variants was further supported by electrophysiological studies in Xenopus laevis oocytes. We compare CLCN4-related disorder with conditions related to dysfunction of other members of the CLC family.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 23 August 2016; doi:10.1038/mp.2016.135.

Effects of Halide Ions on the Carbamidocyclophane Biosynthesis in Nostoc sp. CAVN2
Preisitsch(*), M., Heiden(*), S. E., Beerbaum, M., Niedermeyer(*), T. H., Schneefeld(*), M., Herrmann(*), J., Kumpfmüller(*), J., Thürmer(*), A., Neidhardt(*), I., Wiesner(*), C., Daniel(*), R., Müller(*), R., Bange(*), F. C., Schmieder, P., Schweder(*), T.; Mundt(*), S.
Mar Drugs, 14:21
(2016)

Tags: Solution NMR (Schmieder)

Abstract: In this study, the influence of halide ions on [7.7]paracyclophane biosynthesis in the cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. CAVN2 was investigated. In contrast to KI and KF, supplementation of the culture medium with KCl or KBr resulted not only in an increase of growth but also in an up-regulation of carbamidocyclophane production. LC-MS analysis indicated the presence of chlorinated, brominated, but also non-halogenated derivatives. In addition to 22 known cylindrocyclophanes and carbamidocyclophanes, 27 putative congeners have been detected. Nine compounds, carbamidocyclophanes M-U, were isolated, and their structural elucidation by 1D and 2D NMR experiments in combination with HRMS and ECD analysis revealed that they are brominated analogues of chlorinated carbamidocyclophanes. Quantification of the carbamidocyclophanes showed that chloride is the preferably utilized halide, but incorporation is reduced in the presence of bromide. Evaluation of the antibacterial activity of 30 [7.7]paracyclophanes and related derivatives against selected pathogenic Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria exhibited remarkable effects especially against methicillin- and vancomycin-resistant staphylococci and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. For deeper insights into the mechanisms of biosynthesis, the carbamidocyclophane biosynthetic gene cluster in Nostoc sp. CAVN2 was studied. The gene putatively coding for the carbamoyltransferase has been identified. Based on bioinformatic analyses, a possible biosynthetic assembly is discussed.

Antifungal membranolytic activity of the tyrocidines against filamentous plant fungi
Rautenbach(*), M., Troskie(*), A. M., Vosloo(*), J. A.; Dathe, M. E.
Biochimie, 130:122-131
(2016)

Tags: Peptide-Lipid-Interaction/ Peptide Transport (Dathe)

Abstract: The tyrocidines and analogues are cyclic decapeptides produced by Brevibacillus parabrevis with a conserved sequence of cyclo(D-Phe1-Pro2-X3-x4-Asn5-Gln6-X7-Val8-X9-Leu10) with Trp3,4/Phe3,4 in the aromatic dipeptide unit, Lys9/Orn9 as their cationic residue and Tyr (tyrocidines), Trp (tryptocidines) or Phe (phenicidines) in position 7. Previous studies indicated they have a broad antifungal spectrum with the peptides containing a Tyr residue in position 7 being more active than those with a Phe or Trp residue in this position. Detailed analysis of antifungal inhibition parameters revealed that Phe3-D-Phe4 in the aromatic dipeptide unit lead to more consistent activity against the three filamentous fungi in this study. These peptides exhibited high membrane activity and fast leakage kinetics against model membranes emulating fungal membranes, with selectivity towards ergosterol containing membranes. More fluid membranes and doping of liposomes with the sphingolipid, glucosylceramide, led to a decreased permeabilising activity. Peptide-induced uptake of membrane impermeable dyes was observed in hyphae of both Fusarium solani and Botrytis cinerea, with uptake more pronounced at the hyphal growth tips that are known to contain ergosterol-sphigolipid rich lipid rafts. Tyrocidine interaction with these rafts may lead to the previously observed fungal hyperbranching. However, the leakage of model membranes and Bot. cinerea did not correlate directly with the antifungal inhibition parameters, indicating another target or mode of action. Proteinase K treatment of target fungi had a minimal influence or even improved the tyrocidine activity, ruling out a mannoprotein target in the fungal cell wall. beta-glucanase treatment of Bot. cinerea did not significantly affect the tyrocidine activity, but there was a significant loss in activity towards the beta-glucanase treated F. solani. This study showed the tyrocidine antifungal membrane activity is selective towards ergosterol and possibly lipid rafts, but also point to additional targets such as the cell wall beta-glucans that could modulate their activity.

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Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (FMP)
Campus Berlin-Buch
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