FMP Publications

Our publications are recorded in a searchable database since 2010, updates will be added regularly.

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References
Hydrogen bonding involving side chain exchangeable groups stabilizes amyloid quarternary structure
Agarwal, V., Linser, R., Dasari, M., Fink, U., del Amo, J. M.; Reif, B.
Phys Chem Chem Phys, 15:12551-12557
(2013)

Tags: Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy (Reif)

Abstract: The amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) is the major structural component of amyloid fibrils in the plaques of brains of Alzheimer's disease patients. Numerous studies have addressed important aspects of secondary and tertiary structure of fibrils. In electron microscopic images, fibrils often bundle together. The mechanisms which drive the association of protofilaments into bundles of fibrils are not known. We show here that amino acid side chain exchangeable groups like e.g. histidines can provide useful restraints to determine the quarternary assembly of an amyloid fibril. Exchangeable protons are only observable if a side chain hydrogen bond is formed and the respective protons are protected from exchange. The method relies on deuteration of the Abeta peptide. Exchangeable deuterons are substituted with protons, before fibril formation is initiated.

The mechanism of denaturation and the unfolded state of the alpha-helical membrane-associated protein Mistic
Jacso, T., Bardiaux, B., Broecker(*), J., Fiedler(*), S., Baerwinkel(*), T., Mainz, A., Fink, U., Vargas(*), C., Oschkinat, H., Keller(*), S.; Reif, B.
J Am Chem Soc, 135:18884-18891
(2013)

Tags: Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy (Reif), NMR-Supported Structure Biology (Oschkinat)

Abstract: In vitro protein-folding studies using chemical denaturants such as urea are indispensible in elucidating the forces and mechanisms determining the stability, structure, and dynamics of water-soluble proteins. By contrast, alpha-helical membrane-associated proteins largely evade such approaches because they are resilient to extensive unfolding. We have used optical and NMR spectroscopy to provide an atomistic-level dissection of the effects of urea on the structure and dynamics of the alpha-helical membrane-associated protein Mistic as well as its interactions with detergent and solvent molecules. In the presence of the zwitterionic detergent lauryl dimethylamine oxide, increasing concentrations of urea result in a complex sequence of conformational changes that go beyond simple two-state unfolding. Exploiting this finding, we report the first high-resolution structural models of the urea denaturation process of an alpha-helical membrane-associated protein and its completely unfolded state, which contains almost no regular secondary structure but nevertheless retains a topology close to that of the folded state.

A Well-Defined Pd Hybrid Material for the Z-Selective Semihydrogenation of Alkynes Characterized at the Molecular Level by DNP SENS
Conley(*), M. P., Drost(*), R. M., Baffert(*), M., Gajan(*), D., Elsevier(*), C., Franks, W. T., Oschkinat, H., Veyre(*), L., Zagdoun(*), A., Rossini(*), A., Lelli(*), M., Lesage(*), A., Casano(*), G., Ouari(*), O., Tordo(*), P., Emsley(*), L., Coperet(*), C.; Thieuleux(*), C.
Chem-Eur J, 19:12234-12238
(2013)

Tags: NMR-Supported Structural Biology (Oschkinat)

Improved Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Surface-Enhanced NMR Spectroscopy through Controlled Incorporation of Deuterated Functional Groups
Zagdoun(*), A., Rossini(*), A. J., Conley(*), M. P., Grüning(*), W. R., Schwarzwälder(*), M., Lelli(*), M., Franks, W. T., Oschkinat, H., Coperet(*), C., Emsley(*), L.; Lesage(*), A.
Angew Chem Int Edit, 52:1222-1225
(2013)

Tags: NMR-Supported Structural Biology (Oschkinat)

Small-molecule screening identifies modulators of aquaporin-2 trafficking
Bogum, J., Faust(*), D., Zühlke, K., Eichhorst, J., Moutty, M. C., Furkert, J., Eldahshan(*), A., Neuenschwander, M., von Kries, J. P., Wiesner, B., Trimpert(*), C., Deen(*), P. M., Valenti(*), G., Rosenthal(*), W.; Klussmann(*), E.
Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : JASN, 24:744-758
(2013)

Tags: Cellular Imaging (Wiesner), Screening Unit (von Kries), Anchored Signaling (Klussmann)

Abstract: In the principal cells of the renal collecting duct, arginine vasopressin (AVP) stimulates the synthesis of cAMP, leading to signaling events that culminate in the phosphorylation of aquaporin-2 water channels and their redistribution from intracellular domains to the plasma membrane via vesicular trafficking. The molecular mechanisms that control aquaporin-2 trafficking and the consequent water reabsorption, however, are not completely understood. Here, we used a cell-based assay and automated immunofluorescence microscopy to screen 17,700 small molecules for inhibitors of the cAMP-dependent redistribution of aquaporin-2. This approach identified 17 inhibitors, including 4-acetyldiphyllin, a selective blocker of vacuolar H(+)-ATPase that increases the pH of intracellular vesicles and causes accumulation of aquaporin-2 in the Golgi compartment. Although 4-acetyldiphyllin did not inhibit forskolin-induced increases in cAMP formation and downstream activation of protein kinase A (PKA), it did prevent cAMP/PKA-dependent phosphorylation at serine 256 of aquaporin-2, which triggers the redistribution to the plasma membrane. It did not, however, prevent cAMP-induced changes to the phosphorylation status at serines 261 or 269. Last, we identified the fungicide fluconazole as an inhibitor of cAMP-mediated redistribution of aquaporin-2, but its target in this pathway remains unknown. In conclusion, our screening approach provides a method to begin dissecting molecular mechanisms underlying AVP-mediated water reabsorption, evidenced by our identification of 4-acetyldiphyllin as a modulator of aquaporin-2 trafficking.

Different intra- and intermolecular activation mechanisms at the human lutropin receptor: Lutropin induces only cis- and choriogonadotropin also trans-activation
Grzesik, P., Teichmann, A., Furkert, J., Rutz, C., Wiesner, B., Kleinau(*), G., Schülein, R., Gromoll(*), J.; Krause, G.
Exp Clin Endocr Diab, 121
(2013)

Tags: Structural Bioinformatics and Protein Design (Krause, G.), Cellular Imaging (Wiesner), Protein Trafficking (Schülein)

The new KCNQ2 activator 4-Chlor-N-(6-chlor-pyridin-3-yl)-benzamid displays anticonvulsant potential
Boehlen(*), A., Schwake(*), M., Dost(*), R., Kunert(*), A., Fidzinski, P., Heinemann(*), U.; Gebhardt(*), C.
Brit J Pharmacol, 168:1182-1200
(2013)

Tags: Physiology and Pathology of Ion Transport (Jentsch)

Abstract: Background and Purpose KCNQ2-5 channels are voltage-gated potassium channels that regulate neuronal excitability and represent suitable targets for the treatment of hyperexcitability disorders. The effect of Chlor-N-(6-chlor-pyridin-3-yl)-benzamid was tested on KCNQ subtypes for its ability to alter neuronal excitability and for its anticonvulsant potential. Experimental Approach The effect of 4-Chlor-N-(6-chlor-pyridin-3-yl)-benzamid was evaluated using whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings from CHO cells and Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing different types of KCNQ channels. Epileptiform afterdischarges were recorded in fully amygdala-kindled rats in vivo. Neuronal excitability was assessed using field potential and whole cell recording in rat hippocampus in vitro. Key Results 4-Chlor-N-(6-chlor-pyridin-3-yl)-benzamid caused a hyperpolarizing shift of the activation curve and a pronounced slowing of deactivation in KCNQ2-mediated currents, whereas KCNQ3/5 heteromers remained unaffected. The effect was also apparent in the Retigabine-insensitive mutant KCNQ2-W236L. In fully amygdala-kindled rats, it elevated the threshold for induction of afterdischarges and reduced seizure severity and duration. In hippocampal CA1 cells, 4-Chlor-N-(6-chlor-pyridin-3-yl)-benzamid strongly damped neuronal excitability caused by a membrane hyperpolarization and a decrease in membrane resistance and induced an increase of the somatic resonance frequency on the single cell level, whereas synaptic transmission was unaffected. On the network level, 4-Chlor-N-(6-chlor-pyridin-3-yl)-benzamid caused a significant reduction of and oscillation peak power, with no significant change in oscillation frequency. Conclusion and Implications Our data indicate that 4-Chlor-N-(6-chlor-pyridin-3-yl)-benzamid is a potent KCNQ activator with a selectivity for KCNQ2 containing channels. It strongly reduces neuronal excitability and displays anticonvulsant activity in vivo.

Completion of proteomic data sets by Kd measurement using cell-free synthesis of site-specifically labeled proteins
Majkut, P., Claussnitzer(*), I., Merk(*), H., Freund(*), C., Hackenberger, C. P.; Gerrits(*), M.
Plos One, 8:e82352
(2013)

Tags: Chemical Biology II (Hackenberger)

Abstract: The characterization of phosphotyrosine mediated protein-protein interactions is vital for the interpretation of downstream pathways of transmembrane signaling processes. Currently however, there is a gap between the initial identification and characterization of cellular binding events by proteomic methods and the in vitro generation of quantitative binding information in the form of equilibrium rate constants (Kd values). In this work we present a systematic, accelerated and simplified approach to fill this gap: using cell-free protein synthesis with site-specific labeling for pull-down and microscale thermophoresis (MST) we were able to validate interactions and to establish a binding hierarchy based on Kd values as a completion of existing proteomic data sets. As a model system we analyzed SH2-mediated interactions of the human T-cell phosphoprotein ADAP. Putative SH2 domain-containing binding partners were synthesized from a cDNA library using Expression-PCR with site-specific biotinylation in order to analyze their interaction with fluorescently labeled and in vitro phosphorylated ADAP by pull-down. On the basis of the pull-down results, selected SH2's were subjected to MST to determine Kd values. In particular, we could identify an unexpectedly strong binding of ADAP to the previously found binding partner Rasa1 of about 100 nM, while no evidence of interaction was found for the also predicted SH2D1A. Moreover, Kd values between ADAP and its known binding partners SLP-76 and Fyn were determined. Next to expanding data on ADAP suggesting promising candidates for further analysis in vivo, this work marks the first Kd values for phosphotyrosine/SH2 interactions on a phosphoprotein level.

Oligomerization of Dynamin Superfamily Proteins in Health and Disease
Faelber(*), K., Gao(*), S., Held(*), M., Posor, Y., Haucke, V., Noe(*), F.; Daumke(*), O.
Prog Mol Biol Transl, 117:411-443
(2013)

Tags: Molecular Pharmacology and Cell Biology (Haucke)

Abstract: Proteins of the dynamin superfamily are mechanochemical GTPases, which mediate nucleotide-dependent membrane remodeling events. The founding member dynamin is recruited to the neck of clathrin-coated endocytic vesicles where it oligomerizes into helical filaments. Nucleotide-hydrolysis-induced conformational changes in the oligomer catalyze scission of the vesicle neck. Here, we review recent insights into structure, function, and oligomerization of dynamin superfamily proteins and their roles in human diseases. We describe in detail the molecular mechanisms how dynamin oligomerizes at membranes and introduce a model how oligomerization is linked to membrane fission. Finally, we discuss molecular mechanisms how mutations in dynamin could lead to the congenital diseases, Centronuclear Myopathy and Charcot-Marie Tooth disease.

Combinatorial approach to drastically enhance the monoclonal antibody efficacy in targeted tumor therapy.
Gilabert-Oriol(*), R., Thakur(*), M., von Mallinckrodt(*), B., Hug(*), T., Wiesner, B., Eichhorst, J., Melzig(*), M. F., Fuchs(*), H.; Weng(*), A.
Mol Cancer Ther, 12
(2013)

Tags: Cellular Imaging (Wiesner)

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Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (FMP)
Campus Berlin-Buch
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13125 Berlin, Germany
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