FMP Publications

Our publications are recorded in a searchable database since 2010, updates will be added regularly.

Year:  
All :: 2010, ... , 2013, 2014, 2015, ... , 2017
Author:  
All :: (, A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W, X, Y, Z 
Preferences: 
References per page: Show keywords Show abstracts
References
N-[6-(4-butanoyl-5-methyl-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)pyridazin-3-yl]-5-chloro-1-[2-(4-methyl piperazin-1-yl)-2-oxoethyl]-1H-indole-3-carboxamide (SAR216471), a novel intravenous and oral, reversible, and directly acting P2Y12 antagonist
Boldron(*), C., Besse(*), A., Bordes(*), M. F., Tissandie(*), S., Yvon(*), X., Gau(*), B., Badorc(*), A., Rousseaux(*), T., Barre(*), G., Meneyrol(*), J., Zech(*), G., Nazare, M., Fossey(*), V., Pflieger(*), A. M., Bonnet-Lignon(*), S., Millet(*), L., Briot(*), C., Dol(*), F., Herault(*), J. P., Savi(*), P., Lassalle(*), G., Delesque(*), N., Herbert(*), J. M.; Bono(*), F.
Journal of medicinal chemistry, 57:7293-7316
(2014)

Tags: Medicinal Chemistry (Nazare)

Abstract: In the search of a potential backup for clopidogrel, we have initiated a HTS campaign designed to identify novel reversible P2Y12 antagonists. Starting from a hit with low micromolar binding activity, we report here the main steps of the optimization process leading to the identification of the preclinical candidate SAR216471. It is a potent, highly selective, and reversible P2Y12 receptor antagonist and by far the most potent inhibitor of ADP-induced platelet aggregation among the P2Y12 antagonists described in the literature. SAR216471 displays potent in vivo antiplatelet and antithrombotic activities and has the potential to differentiate from other antiplatelet agents.

Disorder and residual helicity alter p53-Mdm2 binding affinity and signaling in cells
Borcherds(*), W., Theillet, F. X., Katzer(*), A., Finzel(*), A., Mishall(*), K. M., Powell(*), A. T., Wu(*), H., Manieri(*), W., Dieterich(*), C., Selenko, P., Loewer(*), A.; Daughdrill(*), G. W.
Nat Chem Biol, 10:1000-1002
(2014)

Tags: In-Cell NMR (Selenko)

Abstract: Levels of residual structure in disordered interaction domains determine in vitro binding affinities, but whether they exert similar roles in cells is not known. Here, we show that increasing residual p53 helicity results in stronger Mdm2 binding, altered p53 dynamics, impaired target gene expression and failure to induce cell cycle arrest upon DNA damage. These results establish that residual structure is an important determinant of signaling fidelity in cells.

PI3K class II alpha controls spatially restricted endosomal PtdIns3P and Rab11 activation to promote primary cilium function
Franco(*), I., Gulluni(*), F., Campa(*), C. C., Costa(*), C., Margaria(*), J. P., Ciraolo(*), E., Martini(*), M., Monteyne(*), D., De Luca(*), E., Germena(*), G., Posor, Y., Maffucci(*), T., Marengo(*), S., Haucke, V., Falasca(*), M., Perez-Morga(*), D., Boletta(*), A., Merlo(*), G. R.; Hirsch(*), E.
Dev Cell, 28:647-658
(2014)

Tags: Molecular Pharmacology and Cell Biology (Haucke)

Abstract: Multiple phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) 3-kinases (PI3Ks) can produce PtdIns3P to control endocytic trafficking, but whether enzyme specialization occurs in defined subcellular locations is unclear. Here, we report that PI3K-C2alpha is enriched in the pericentriolar recycling endocytic compartment (PRE) at the base of the primary cilium, where it regulates production of a specific pool of PtdIns3P. Loss of PI3K-C2alpha-derived PtdIns3P leads to mislocalization of PRE markers such as TfR and Rab11, reduces Rab11 activation, and blocks accumulation of Rab8 at the primary cilium. These changes in turn cause defects in primary cilium elongation, Smo ciliary translocation, and Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling and ultimately impair embryonic development. Selective reconstitution of PtdIns3P levels in cells lacking PI3K-C2alpha rescues Rab11 activation, primary cilium length, and Shh pathway induction. Thus, PI3K-C2alpha regulates the formation of a PtdIns3P pool at the PRE required for Rab11 and Shh pathway activation.

EU-OPENSCREEN-chemical tools for the study of plant biology and resistance mechanisms
Meiners, T., Stechmann, B.; Frank, R.
J Chem Biol, 7:113-118
(2014)

Tags: Chemical Systems Biology (Frank)

Abstract: EU-OPENSCREEN is an academic research infrastructure initiative in Europe for enabling researchers in all life sciences to take advantage of chemical biology approaches to their projects. In a collaborative effort of national networks in 16 European countries, EU-OPENSCREEN will develop novel chemical compounds with external users to address questions in, among other fields, systems and network biology (directed and selective perturbation of signalling pathways), structural biology (compound-target interactions at atomic resolution), pharmacology (early drug discovery and toxicology) and plant biology (response of wild or crop plants to environmental and agricultural substances). EU-OPENSCREEN supports all stages of a tool development project, including assay adaptation, high-throughput screening and chemical optimisation of the 'hit' compounds. All tool compounds and data will be made available to the scientific community. EU-OPENSCREEN integrates high-capacity screening platforms throughout Europe, which share a rationally selected compound collection comprising up to 300,000 (commercial and proprietary compounds collected from European chemists). By testing systematically this chemical collection in hundreds of assays originating from very different biological themes, the screening process generates enormous amounts of information about the biological activities of the substances and thereby steadily enriches our understanding of how and where they act.

Design of a General-Purpose European Compound Screening Library for EU-OPENSCREEN
Horvath(*), D., Lisurek, M., Rupp, B., Kühne, R., Specker, E., von Kries, J., Rognan(*), D., Andersson(*), C. D., Almqvist(*), F., Elofsson(*), M., Enqvist(*), P. A., Gustavsson(*), A. L., Remez(*), N., Mestres(*), J., Marcou(*), G., Varnek(*), A., Hibert(*), M., Quintana(*), J.; Frank, R.
Chemmedchem, 9:2309-2326
(2014)

Tags: Chemical Systems Biology (Frank), Screening Unit (von Kries), Computational Chemistry and Protein Design (Kühne)

Abstract: This work describes a collaborative effort to define and apply a protocol for the rational selection of a general-purpose screening library, to be used by the screening platforms affiliated with the EU-OPENSCREEN initiative. It is designed as a standard source of compounds for primary screening against novel biological targets, at the request of research partners. Given the general nature of the potential applications of this compound collection, the focus of the selection strategy lies on ensuring chemical stability, absence of reactive compounds, screening-compliant physicochemical properties, loose compliance to drug-likeness criteria (as drug design is a major, but not exclusive application), and maximal diversity/coverage of chemical space, aimed at providing hits for a wide spectrum of drugable targets. Finally, practical availability/cost issues cannot be avoided. The main goal of this publication is to inform potential future users of this library about its conception, sources, and characteristics. The outline of the selection procedure, notably of the filtering rules designed by a large committee of European medicinal chemists and chemoinformaticians, may be of general methodological interest for the screening/medicinal chemistry community. The selection task of 200K molecules out of a pre-filtered set of 1.4M candidates was shared by five independent European research groups, each picking a subset of 40K compounds according to their own in-house methodology and expertise. An in-depth analysis of chemical space coverage of the library serves not only to characterize the collection, but also to compare the various chemoinformatics-driven selection procedures of maximal diversity sets. Compound selections contributed by various participating groups were mapped onto general-purpose self-organizing maps (SOMs) built on the basis of marketed drugs and bioactive reference molecules. In this way, the occupancy of chemical space by the EU-OPENSCREEN library could be directly compared with distributions of known bioactives of various classes. This mapping highlights the relevance of the selection and shows how the consensus reached by merging the five different 40K selections contributes to achieve this relevance. The approach also allows one to readily identify subsets of target-or target-class-oriented compounds from the EU-OPENSCREEN library to suit the needs of the diverse range of potential users. The final EU-OPENSCREEN library, assembled by merging five independent selections of 40K compounds from various expert groups, represents an excellent example of a Europe-wide collaborative effort toward the common objective of building best-in-class European open screening platforms.

EU-OPENSCREEN--a European infrastructure of open screening platforms for chemical biology
Frank, R.
ACS Chem Biol, 9:853-854
(2014)

Tags: Chemical Systems Biology (Frank)

Live Cell NMR
Freedberg(*), D. I.; Selenko, P.
Annu Rev Biophys, 43:171-192
(2014)

Tags: In-Cell NMR (Selenko)

Abstract: Ever since scientists realized that cells are the basic building blocks of all life, they have been developing tools to look inside them to reveal the architectures and mechanisms that define their biological functions. Whereas "looking into cells" is typically said in reference to optical microscopy, high-resolution in-cell and on-cell nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a powerful method that offers exciting new possibilities for structural and functional studies in and on live cells. In contrast to conventional imaging techniques, in-and on-cell NMR methods do not provide spatial information on cellular biomolecules. Instead, they enable atomic-resolution insights into the native cell states of proteins, nucleic acids, glycans, and lipids. Here we review recent advances and developments in both fields and discuss emerging concepts that have been delineated with these methods.

Reporter assay for endo/lysosomal escape of toxin-based therapeutics
Gilabert-Oriol(*), R., Thakur(*), M., von Mallinckrodt(*), B., Bhargava(*), C., Wiesner, B., Eichhorst, J., Melzig(*), M. F., Fuchs(*), H.; Weng(*), A.
Toxins (Basel), 6:1644-1666
(2014)

Tags: Cellular Imaging (Wiesner)

Abstract: Protein-based therapeutics with cytosolic targets are capable of exhibiting their therapeutic effect once they have escaped from the endosomes or lysosomes. In this study, the reporters-horseradish peroxidase (HRP), Alexa Fluor 488 (Alexa) and ricin A-chain (RTA)-were investigated for their capacity to monitor the endo/lysosomal escape of the ribosome-inactivating protein, saporin. The conjugates-saporin-HRP, (Alexa)saporin and saporin-KQ-RTA-were constructed, and the endo/lysosomal escape of these conjugates alone (lack of endo/lysosomal release) or in combination with certain structurally-specific triterpenoidal saponins (efficient endo/lysosomal escape) was characterized. HRP failed in reporting the endo/lysosomal escape of saporin. Contrastingly, Alexa Fluor 488 successfully allowed the report of the process at a toxin concentration of 1000 nM. In addition, single endo/lysosome analysis facilitated the determination of the amount of (Alexa)saporin released from each vesicle. RTA was also successful in reporting the endo/lysosomal escape of the enzymatically inactive mutant, saporin-KQ, but in this case, the sensitivity of the method reached a toxin concentration of 10 nM. In conclusion, the simultaneous usage of Alexa Fluor 488 and RTA as reporters may provide the possibility of monitoring the endo/lysosomal escape of protein-based therapeutics in the concentration range of 10-1000 nM.

Disrupting MLC1 and GlialCAM and ClC-2 interactions in leukodystrophy entails glial chloride channel dysfunction
Hoegg-Beiler, M. B., Sirisi(*), S., Orozco, I. J., Ferrer(*), I., Hohensee, S., Auberson, M., Gödde, K., Vilches(*), C., de Heredia(*), M. L., Nunes(*), V., Estevez(*), R.; Jentsch, T. J.
Nat Commun, 5:3475
(2014)

Tags: Physiology and Pathology of Ion Transport (Jentsch)

Abstract: Defects in the astrocytic membrane protein MLC1, the adhesion molecule GlialCAM or the chloride channel ClC-2 underlie human leukoencephalopathies. Whereas GlialCAM binds ClC-2 and MLC1, and modifies ClC-2 currents in vitro, no functional connections between MLC1 and ClC-2 are known. Here we investigate this by generating loss-of-function Glialcam and Mlc1 mouse models manifesting myelin vacuolization. We find that ClC-2 is unnecessary for MLC1 and GlialCAM localization in brain, whereas GlialCAM is important for targeting MLC1 and ClC-2 to specialized glial domains in vivo and for modifying ClC-2's biophysical properties specifically in oligodendrocytes (OLs), the cells chiefly affected by vacuolization. Unexpectedly, MLC1 is crucial for proper localization of GlialCAM and ClC-2, and for changing ClC-2 currents. Our data unmask an unforeseen functional relationship between MLC1 and ClC-2 in vivo, which is probably mediated by GlialCAM, and suggest that ClC-2 participates in the pathogenesis of megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts.

Chemoselective Wittig and Michael Ligations of Unprotected Peptidyl Phosphoranes in Water Furnish Potent Inhibitors of Caspase-3
Holland-Nell, K., Fernandez-Bachiller, M. I., Ahsanullah, R.J.; Rademann, J.
Org Lett, 16:4428-4431
(2014)

Tags: Medicinal Chemistry (Rademann)

Abstract: Unprotected peptidyl phosphoranes 1 with sequence Ac-L-aspartyl-L-glutamyl-L-valinyl-L-aspartyl are released from polymer support and react with aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes in aqueous medium in a Wittig ligation. Obtained vinyl ketones 6-12 are potent inhibitors of caspase-3. Vinyl ketone 6, derived from formaldehyde, undergoes Michael ligations with thiol nucleophiles furnishing products 14-16, also in aqueous medium. The demonstrated ligation reactions enable the modification of complex functionalized peptides in water providing bioactive protein ligands without side-chain protection.

Page:  
Previous | 1, 2, 3 | Next
Export as:
BibTeX, XML

Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (FMP)
Campus Berlin-Buch
Robert-Roessle-Str. 10
13125 Berlin, Germany
+4930 94793 - 100 
+4930 94793 - 109 (Fax)
info(at)fmp-berlin.de

Like many sites, we use cookies to optimize the user's browsing experience. Data Protection OK