FMP Publications

Our publications are recorded in a searchable database since 2010, updates will be added regularly.

Year:  
All :: 2010, ... , 2012, 2013, 2014, ... , 2017
Author:  
All :: (, A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W, X, Y, Z 
Preferences: 
References per page: Show keywords Show abstracts
References

2010

Distinct Neuropathologic Phenotypes After Disrupting the Chloride Transport Proteins ClC-6 or ClC-7/Ostm1
Pressey(*), S. N. R., O'Donnell(*), K. J., Stauber, T., Fuhrmann, J. C., Tyynela(*), J., Jentsch, T. J.; Cooper(*), J. D.
J Neuropath Exp Neur, 69:1228-1246
(2010)

Tags: Physiology and Pathology of Ion Transport (Jentsch

Abstract: The proteins ClC-6 and ClC-7 are expressed in the endosomallysosomal system. Because Clcn6-deficient mice display some features of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL), CLCN6 may be a candidate gene for novel forms of NCL. Using landmarks of disease progression from NCL mouse models as a guide, we examined neuropathologic alterations in the central nervous system of Clcn6(-/-), Clcn7(-/-), and gl mice. gl mice bear a mutation in Ostm1, the beta-subunit critical for Clcn7 function. Severely affected Clcn7(-/-) and gl mice have remarkably similar neuropathologic phenotypes, with pronounced reactive changes and neuron loss in the thalamocortical system, similar to findings in early-onset forms of NCL. In contrast, Clcn6(-/-) mice display slowly progressive, milder neuropathologic features with very little thalamic involvement or microglial activation. These findings detail for the first time the markedly different neuropathologic consequences of mutations in these two CLC genes. Clcn7(-/-) and gl mice bear a close resemblance to the progressive neuropathologic phenotypes of early onset forms of NCL, whereas the distinct phenotype of Clcn6-deficient mice suggests that this gene could be a candidate for a later-onset form of mild neurologic dysfunction with some NCL-like features.

The G215R Mutation in the Cl-/H+-Antiporter ClC-7 Found in ADO II Osteopetrosis Does Not Abolish Function but Causes a Severe Trafficking Defect
Schulz(*), P., Werner(*), J., Stauber, T., Henriksen(*), K.; Fendler(*), K.
Plos One, 5
(2010)

Tags: Physiology and Pathology of Ion Transport (Jentsch

Abstract: Background: ClC-7 is a ubiquitous transporter which is broadly expressed in mammalian tissues. It is implied in the pathogenesis of lysosomal storage disease and osteopetrosis. Because of its endosomal/lysosomal localization it is still poorly characterized. Methodology/Principal Findings: An electrophysiological characterization of rat ClC-7 using solid-supported membrane-based electrophysiology is presented. The measured currents show the characteristics of ClC-7 and confirm its function as a Cl-/H+-antiporter. We have used rat ClC-7 in CHO cells as a model system to investigate the functionality and cellular localization of the wt transporter and its variant G213R ClC-7 which is the analogue of human G215R ClC-7 responsible for autosomal dominant osteopetrosis type II. Our study shows that rat G213R ClC-7 is functional but has a localization defect in CHO cells which prevents it from being correctly targeted to the lysosomal membrane. The electrophysiological assay is tested as a tool for drug discovery. The assay is validated with a number of drug candidates. It is shown that ClC-7 is inhibited by DIDS, NPPB and NS5818 at micromolar concentrations. Conclusions/Significance: It is suggested that the scenario found in the CHO model system also applies to the human transporter and that mislocalization rather than impaired functionality of G215R ClC-7 is the primary cause of the related autosomal dominant osteopetrosis type II. Furthermore, the robust solid-supported membrane-based electrophysiological assay is proposed for rapid screening for potential ClC-7 inhibitors which are discussed for treatment of osteoporosis.

Structural basis of oligomerization in septin-like GTPase of immunity-associated protein 2 (GIMAP2)
Schwefel(*), D., Fröhlich(*), C., Eichhorst, J., Wiesner, B., Behlke(*), J., Aravind(*), L.; Daumke(*), O.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A, 107:20299-20304
(2010)

Tags: Cellular Imaging (Wiesner)

Abstract: GTPases of immunity-associated proteins (GIMAPs) are a distinctive family of GTPases, which control apoptosis in lymphocytes and play a central role in lymphocyte maturation and lymphocyte-associated diseases. To explore their function and mechanism, we determined crystal structures of a representative member, GIMAP2, in different nucleotide-loading and oligomerization states. Nucleotide-free and GDP-bound GIMAP2 were monomeric and revealed a guanine nucleotide-binding domain of the TRAFAC (translation factor associated) class with a unique amphipathic helix alpha7 packing against switch II. In the absence of alpha7 and the presence of GTP, GIMAP2 oligomerized via two distinct interfaces in the crystal. GTP-induced stabilization of switch I mediates dimerization across the nucleotide-binding site, which also involves the GIMAP specificity motif and the nucleotide base. Structural rearrangements in switch II appear to induce the release of alpha7 allowing oligomerization to proceed via a second interface. The unique architecture of the linear oligomer was confirmed by mutagenesis. Furthermore, we showed a function for the GIMAP2 oligomer at the surface of lipid droplets. Although earlier studies indicated that GIMAPs are related to the septins, the current structure also revealed a strikingly similar nucleotide coordination and dimerization mode as in the dynamin GTPase. Based on this, we reexamined the relationships of the septin- and dynamin-like GTPases and demonstrate that these are likely to have emerged from a common membrane-associated dimerizing ancestor. This ancestral property appears to be critical for the role of GIMAPs as nucleotide-regulated scaffolds on intracellular membranes.

TRIM24 links a non-canonical histone signature to breast cancer
Tsai(*), W. W., Wang(*), Z. X., Yiu(*), T. T., Akdemir(*), K. C., Xia(*), W. Y., Winter(*), S., Tsai(*), C. Y., Shi(*), X. B., Schwarzer, D., Plunkett(*), W., Aronow(*), B., Gozani(*), O., Fischle(*), W., Hung(*), M. C., Patel(*), D. J.; Barton(*), M. C.
Nature, 468:927-U320
(2010)

Tags: Protein Chemistry (Schwarzer)

Abstract: Recognition of modified histone species by distinct structural domains within 'reader' proteins plays a critical role in the regulation of gene expression. Readers that simultaneously recognize histones with multiple marks allow transduction of complex chromatin modification patterns into specific biological outcomes. Here we report that chromatin regulator tripartite motif-containing 24 (TRIM24) functions in humans as a reader of dual histone marks by means of tandem plant homeodomain (PHD) and bromodomain (Bromo) regions. The three-dimensional structure of the PHD-Bromo region of TRIM24 revealed a single functional unit for combinatorial recognition of unmodified H3K4 (that is, histone H3 unmodified at lysine 4, H3K4me0) and acetylated H3K23 (histone H3 acetylated at lysine 23, H3K23ac) within the same histone tail. TRIM24 binds chromatin and oestrogen receptor to activate oestrogen-dependent genes associated with cellular proliferation and tumour development. Aberrant expression of TRIM24 negatively correlates with survival of breast cancer patients. The PHD-Bromo of TRIM24 provides a structural rationale for chromatin activation through a non-canonical histone signature, establishing a new route by which chromatin readers may influence cancer pathogenesis.

Page:  
Previous | 1, ... , 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20 | Next
Export as:
BibTeX, XML

Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (FMP)
Campus Berlin-Buch
Robert-Roessle-Str. 10
13125 Berlin, Germany
+4930 94793 - 100 
+4930 94793 - 109 (Fax)
info(at)fmp-berlin.de

Like many sites, we use cookies to optimize the user's browsing experience. Data Protection OK