FMP Publications

Our publications are recorded in a searchable database since 2010, updates will be added regularly.

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References
Identification of a Novel Benzimidazole Pyrazolone Scaffold That Inhibits KDM4 Lysine Demethylases and Reduces Proliferation of Prostate Cancer Cells
Carter(*), D. M., Specker, E., Przygodda, J., Neuenschwander, M., von Kries, J. P., Heinemann(*), U., Nazare, M.; Gohlke(*), U.
SLAS discovery, 22:801-812
(2017)

Tags: Screening Unit (von Kries), Medicinal Chemistry (Nazare)

Abstract: Human lysine demethylase (KDM) enzymes (KDM1-7) constitute an emerging class of therapeutic targets, with activities that support growth and development of metastatic disease. By interacting with and co-activating the androgen receptor, the KDM4 subfamily (KDM4A-E) promotes aggressive phenotypes of prostate cancer (PCa). Knockdown of KDM4 expression or inhibition of KDM4 enzyme activity reduces the proliferation of PCa cell lines and highlights inhibition of lysine demethylation as a possible therapeutic method for PCa treatment. To address this possibility, we screened the ChemBioNet small molecule library for inhibitors of the human KDM4E isoform and identified several compounds with IC50 values in the low micromolar range. Two hits, validated as active by an orthogonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, displayed moderate selectivity toward the KDM4 subfamily and exhibited antiproliferative effects in cellular models of PCa. These compounds were further characterized by their ability to maintain the transcriptionally silent histone H3 tri-methyl K9 epigenetic mark at subcytotoxic concentrations. Taken together, these efforts identify and validate a hydroxyquinoline scaffold and a novel benzimidazole pyrazolone scaffold as tractable for entry into hit-to-lead chemical optimization campaigns.

Trictide, a tricellulin-derived peptide to overcome cellular barriers
Cording, J., Arslan, B., Staat, C., Dithmer, S., Krug(*), S. M., Krüger(*), A., Berndt, P., Günther, R., Winkler, L., Blasig, I. E.; Haseloff, R. F.
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences,
(2017)

Tags: Molecular Cell Physiology (Blasig, I.E.)

Abstract: The majority of tight junction (TJ) proteins restrict the paracellular permeation of solutes via their extracellular loops (ECLs). Tricellulin tightens tricellular TJs (tTJs) and regulates bicellular TJ (bTJ) proteins. We demonstrate that the addition of recombinantly produced extracellular loop 2 (ECL2) of tricellulin opens cellular barriers. The peptidomimetic trictide, a synthetic peptide derived from tricellulin ECL2, increases the passage of ions, as well as of small and larger molecules up to 10 kDa, between 16 and 30 h after application to human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line 2. Tricellulin and lipolysis-stimulated lipoprotein receptor relocate from tTJs toward bTJs, while the TJ proteins claudin-1 and occludin redistribute from bTJs to the cytosol. Analyzing the opening of the tricellular sealing tube by the peptidomimetic using super-resolution stimulated-emission depletion microscopy revealed a tricellulin-free area at the tricellular region. Cis-interactions (as measured by fluorescence resonance energy transfer) of tricellulin-tricellulin (tTJs), tricellulin-claudin-1, tricellulin-marvelD3, and occludin-occludin (bTJs) were strongly affected by trictide treatment. Circular dichroism spectroscopy and molecular modeling suggest that trictide adopts a beta-sheet structure, resulting in a peculiar interaction surface for its binding to tricellulin. In conclusion, trictide is a novel and promising tool for overcoming cellular barriers at bTJs and tTJs with the potential to transiently improve drug delivery.

Claudin peptidomimetics modulate tissue barriers for enhanced drug delivery
Dithmer, S., Staat, C., Müller, C., Ku(*), M. C., Pohlmann(*), A., Niendorf(*), T., Gehne, N., Fallier-Becker(*), P., Kittel(*), A., Walter(*), F. R., Veszelka(*), S., Deli(*), M. A., Blasig, R., Haseloff, R. F., Blasig, I. E.; Winkler, L.
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1397:169-184
(2017)

Tags: Molecular Cell Physiology (Blasig, I.E.)

Abstract: The blood-brain barrier (BBB) formed by the microvascular endothelium limits cerebral drug delivery. The paraendothelial cleft is sealed by tight junctions (TJs) with a major contribution from claudin-5, which we selected as a target to modulate BBB permeability. For this purpose, drug-enhancer peptides were designed based on the first extracellular loop (ECL) of claudin-5 to allow transient BBB permeabilization. Peptidomimetics (C5C2 and derivatives, nanomolar affinity to claudin-5) size-selectively (</=40 kDa) and reversibly (12-48 h) increased the permeability of brain endothelial and claudin-5-transfected epithelial cell monolayers. Upon peptide uptake, the number of TJ strand particles diminished, claudin-5 was downregulated and redistributed from cell-cell contacts to the cytosol, and the cell shape was altered. Cellular permeability of doxorubicin (cytostatic drug, 580 Da) was enhanced after peptide administration. Mouse studies (3.5 mumol/kg i.v.) confirmed that, for both C5C2 and a d-amino acid derivative, brain uptake of Gd-diethylene-triamine penta-acetic acid (547 Da) was enhanced within 4 h of treatment. On the basis of our functional data, circular dichroism measurements, molecular modeling, and docking experiments, we suggest an association model between beta-sheets flanked by alpha-helices, formed by claudin-5 ECLs, and the peptides. In conclusion, we identified claudin-5 peptidomimetics that improve drug delivery through endothelial and epithelial barriers expressing claudin-5.

Cross-over endocytosis of claudins is mediated by interactions via their extracellular loops
Gehne, N., Lamik, A., Lehmann, M., Haseloff, R. F., Andjelkovic(*), A. V.; Blasig, I. E.
Plos One, 12:e0182106
(2017)

Tags: Molecular Cell Physiology (Blasig, I.E.), Cellular Imaging (Wiesner, Puchkov)

Abstract: Claudins (Cldns) are transmembrane tight junction (TJ) proteins that paracellularly seal endo- and epithelial barriers by their interactions within the TJs. However, the mechanisms allowing TJ remodeling while maintaining barrier integrity are largely unknown. Cldns and occludin are heterophilically and homophilically cross-over endocytosed into neighboring cells in large, double membrane vesicles. Super-resolution microscopy confirmed the presence of Cldns in these vesicles and revealed a distinct separation of Cldns derived from opposing cells within cross-over endocytosed vesicles. Colocalization of cross-over endocytosed Cldn with the autophagosome markers as well as inhibition of autophagosome biogenesis verified involvement of the autophagosomal pathway. Accordingly, cross-over endocytosed Cldns underwent lysosomal degradation as indicated by lysosome markers. Cross-over endocytosis of Cldn5 depended on clathrin and caveolin pathways but not on dynamin. Cross-over endocytosis also depended on Cldn-Cldn-interactions. Amino acid substitutions in the second extracellular loop of Cldn5 (F147A, Q156E) caused impaired cis- and trans-interaction, as well as diminished cross-over endocytosis. Moreover, F147A exhibited an increased mobility in the membrane, while Q156E was not as mobile but enhanced the paracellular permeability. In conclusion, the endocytosis of TJ proteins depends on their ability to interact strongly with each other in cis and trans, and the mobility of Cldns in the membrane is not necessarily an indicator of barrier permeability. TJ-remodeling via cross-over endocytosis represents a general mechanism for the degradation of transmembrane proteins in cell-cell contacts and directly links junctional membrane turnover to autophagy.

Intersectin associates with synapsin and regulates its nanoscale localization and function
Gerth(*), F., Jäpel, M., Pechstein, A., Kochlamazashvili, G., Lehmann, M., Puchkov, D., Onofri(*), F., Benfenati(*), F., Nikonenko(*), A. G., Maritzen, T., Freund(*), C.; Haucke, V.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A, 114:12057-12062
(2017)

Tags: Molecular Pharmacology and Cell Biology (Haucke); Membrane Traffic and Cell Motility (Maritzen)

Abstract: Neurotransmission is mediated by the exocytic release of neurotransmitters from readily releasable synaptic vesicles (SVs) at the active zone. To sustain neurotransmission during periods of elevated activity, release-ready vesicles need to be replenished from the reserve pool of SVs. The SV-associated synapsins are crucial for maintaining this reserve pool and regulate the mobilization of reserve pool SVs. How replenishment of release-ready SVs from the reserve pool is regulated and which other factors cooperate with synapsins in this process is unknown. Here we identify the endocytic multidomain scaffold protein intersectin as an important regulator of SV replenishment at hippocampal synapses. We found that intersectin directly associates with synapsin I through its Src-homology 3 A domain, and this association is regulated by an intramolecular switch within intersectin 1. Deletion of intersectin 1/2 in mice alters the presynaptic nanoscale distribution of synapsin I and causes defects in sustained neurotransmission due to defective SV replenishment. These phenotypes were rescued by wild-type intersectin 1 but not by a locked mutant of intersectin 1. Our data reveal intersectin as an autoinhibited scaffold that serves as a molecular linker between the synapsin-dependent reserve pool and the presynaptic endocytosis machinery.

Intersectin 1 is a component of the Reelin pathway to regulate neuronal migration and synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus
Jakob, B., Kochlamazashvili, G., Jaepel, M., Gauhar(*), A., Bock(*), H. H., Maritzen, T.; Haucke, V.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A, 114:5533-5538
(2017)

Tags: Membrane Traffic and Cell Motility (Maritzen), Molecular Pharmacology and Cell Biology (Haucke)

Abstract: Brain development and function depend on the directed and coordinated migration of neurons from proliferative zones to their final position. The secreted glycoprotein Reelin is an important factor directing neuronal migration. Loss of Reelin function results in the severe developmental disorder lissencephaly and is associated with neurological diseases in humans. Reelin signals via the lipoprotein receptors very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) and apolipoprotein E receptor 2 (ApoER2), but the exact mechanism by which these receptors control cellular function is poorly understood. We report that loss of the signaling scaffold intersectin 1 (ITSN1) in mice leads to defective neuronal migration and ablates Reelin stimulation of hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). Knockout (KO) mice lacking ITSN1 suffer from dispersion of pyramidal neurons and malformation of the radial glial scaffold, akin to the hippocampal lamination defects observed in VLDLR or ApoER2 mutants. ITSN1 genetically interacts with Reelin receptors, as evidenced by the prominent neuronal migration and radial glial defects in hippocampus and cortex seen in double-KO mice lacking ITSN1 and ApoER2. These defects were similar to, albeit less severe than, those observed in Reelin-deficient or VLDLR/ ApoER2 double-KO mice. Molecularly, ITSN1 associates with the VLDLR and its downstream signaling adaptor Dab1 to facilitate Reelin signaling. Collectively, these data identify ITSN1 as a component of Reelin signaling that acts predominantly by facilitating the VLDLR-Dab1 axis to direct neuronal migration in the cortex and hippocampus and to augment synaptic plasticity.

Retrograde transport of TrkB-containing autophagosomes via the adaptor AP-2 mediates neuronal complexity and prevents neurodegeneration
Kononenko, N. L., Claßen, G. A., Kuijpers, M., Puchkov, D., Maritzen, T., Tempes(*), A., Malik(*), A. R., Skalecka(*), A., Bera(*), S., Jaworski(*), J.; Haucke, V.
Nat Commun, 8:14819
(2017)

Tags: Molecular Pharmacology and Cell Biology (Haucke), Membrane Traffic and Cell Motility (Maritzen), Cellular Imaging (Wiesner, Puchkov)

Abstract: Autophagosomes primarily mediate turnover of cytoplasmic proteins or organelles to provide nutrients and eliminate damaged proteins. In neurons, autophagosomes form in distal axons and are trafficked retrogradely to fuse with lysosomes in the soma. Although defective neuronal autophagy is associated with neurodegeneration, the function of neuronal autophagosomes remains incompletely understood. We show that in neurons, autophagosomes promote neuronal complexity and prevent neurodegeneration in vivo via retrograde transport of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-activated TrkB receptors. p150Glued/dynactin-dependent transport of TrkB-containing autophagosomes requires their association with the endocytic adaptor AP-2, an essential protein complex previously thought to function exclusively in clathrin-mediated endocytosis. These data highlight a novel non-canonical function of AP-2 in retrograde transport of BDNF/TrkB-containing autophagosomes in neurons and reveal a causative link between autophagy and BDNF/TrkB signalling.

mTORC1 activity repression by late endosomal phosphatidylinositol 3,4-bisphosphate
Marat, A. L., Wallroth, A., Lo, W. T., Müller(*), R., Norata(*), G. D., Falasca(*), M., Schultz(*), C.; Haucke, V.
Science, 356:968-972
(2017)

Tags: Molecular Pharmacology and Cell Biology (Haucke)

Abstract: Nutrient sensing by mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) on lysosomes and late endosomes (LyLEs) regulates cell growth. Many factors stimulate mTORC1 activity, including the production of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate [PI(3,4,5)P3] by class I phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3Ks) at the plasma membrane. We investigated mechanisms that repress mTORC1 under conditions of growth factor deprivation. We identified phosphatidylinositol 3,4-bisphosphate [PI(3,4)P2], synthesized by class II PI3K beta (PI3KC2beta) at LyLEs, as a negative regulator of mTORC1, whereas loss of PI3KC2beta hyperactivated mTORC1. Growth factor deprivation induced the association of PI3KC2beta with the Raptor subunit of mTORC1. Local PI(3,4)P2 synthesis triggered repression of mTORC1 activity through association of Raptor with inhibitory 14-3-3 proteins. These results unravel an unexpected function for local PI(3,4)P2 production in shutting off mTORC1.

An Integrative Framework Reveals Signaling-to-Transcription Events in Toll-like Receptor Signaling
Mertins(*), P., Przybylski(*), D., Yosef(*), N., Qiao(*), J., Clauser(*), K., Raychowdhury(*), R., Eisenhaure(*), T. M., Maritzen, T., Haucke, V., Satoh(*), T., Akira(*), S., Carr(*), S. A., Regev(*), A., Hacohen(*), N.; Chevrier(*), N.
Cell Rep, 19:2853-2866
(2017)

Tags: Molecular Pharmacology and Cell Biology (Haucke), Membrane Traffic and Cell Motility (Maritzen)

Abstract: Building an integrated view of cellular responses to environmental cues remains a fundamental challenge due to the complexity of intracellular networks in mammalian cells. Here, we introduce an integrative biochemical and genetic framework to dissect signal transduction events using multiple data types and, in particular, to unify signaling and transcriptional networks. Using the Toll-like receptor (TLR) system as a model cellular response, we generate multifaceted datasets on physical, enzymatic, and functional interactions and integrate these data to reveal biochemical paths that connect TLR4 signaling to transcription. We define the roles of proximal TLR4 kinases, identify and functionally test two dozen candidate regulators, and demonstrate a role for Ap1ar (encoding the Gadkin protein) and its binding partner, Picalm, potentially linking vesicle transport with pro-inflammatory responses. Our study thus demonstrates how deciphering dynamic cellular responses by integrating datasets on various regulatory layers defines key components and higher-order logic underlying signaling-to-transcription pathways.

Eighth International Chorea-Acanthocytosis Symposium: Summary of Workshop Discussion and Action Points
Pappas(*), S. S., Bonifacino(*), J., Danek(*), A., Dauer, W. T., De(*), M., De Franceschi(*), L., DiPaolo(*), G., Fuller(*), R., Haucke, V., Hermann(*), A., Kornmann(*), B., Landwehrmeyer(*), B., Levin(*), J., Neiman(*), A. M., Rudnicki(*), D. D., Sibon(*), O., Velayos-Baeza(*), A., Vonk(*), J. J., Walker(*), R. H., Weisman(*), L. S.; Albin(*), R. L.
Tremor and other hyperkinetic movements (New York, N.Y.), 7:428
(2017)

Tags: Molecular Pharmacology and Cell Biology (Haucke)

Abstract: Chorea-Acanthocytosis (ChAc) is a rare hereditary neurological disorder characterized by abnormal movements, red blood cell pathology, and progressive neurodegeneration. Little is understood of the pathogenesis of ChAc and related disorders (collectively Neuroacanthocytosis). The Eighth International Chorea-Acanthocytosis Symposium was held in May 2016 in Ann Arbor, MI, USA, and focused on molecular mechanisms driving ChAc pathophysiology. Accompanying the meeting, members of the neuroacanthocytosis research community and other invited scientists met in a workshop to discuss the current understanding and next steps needed to better understand ChAc pathogenesis. These discussions identified several broad and critical needs for advancing ChAc research and patient care, and led to the definition of 18 specific action points related to functional and molecular studies, animal models, and clinical research. These action points, described below, represent tractable research goals to pursue for the next several years.

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Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (FMP)
Campus Berlin-Buch
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13125 Berlin, Germany
+4930 94793 - 100 
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