FMP Publications

Our publications are recorded in a searchable database since 2010, updates will be added regularly.

Year:  
All :: 2010, ... , 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017
Author:  
All :: (, A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W, X, Y, Z 
Preferences: 
References per page: Show keywords Show abstracts
References
X-exome sequencing of 405 unresolved families identifies seven novel intellectual disability genes
Hu(*), H., Haas(*), S. A., Chelly(*), J., Van Esch(*), H., Raynaud(*), M., de Brouwer(*), A. P., Weinert, S., Froyen(*), G., Frints(*), S. G., Laumonnier, F., Zemojtel(*), T., Love(*), M. I., Richard(*), H., Emde(*), A. K., Bienek(*), M., Jensen(*), C., Hambrock(*), M., Fischer(*), U., Langnick(*), C., Feldkamp(*), M., Wissink-Lindhout(*), W., Lebrun(*), N., Castelnau(*), L., Rucci(*), J., Montjean(*), R., Dorseuil(*), O., Billuart(*), P., Stuhlmann, T., Shaw(*), M., Corbett(*), M. A., Gardner(*), A., Willis-Owen(*), S., Tan(*), C., Friend(*), K. L., Belet(*), S., van Roozendaal(*), K. E., Jimenez-Pocquet(*), M., Moizard(*), M. P., Ronce(*), N., Sun(*), R., O'Keeffe(*), S., Chenna(*), R., van Bommel(*), A., Goke(*), J., Hackett(*), A., Field(*), M., Christie(*), L., Boyle(*), J., Haan(*), E., Nelson(*), J., Turner(*), G., Baynam(*), G., Gillessen-Kaesbach(*), G., Müller, U., Steinberger(*), D., Budny(*), B., Badura-Stronka(*), M., Latos-Bielenska(*), A., Ousager(*), L. B., Wieacker(*), P., Rodriguez Criado(*), G., Bondeson(*), M. L., Anneren(*), G., Dufke(*), A., Cohen(*), M., Van Maldergem(*), L., Vincent-Delorme(*), C., Echenne(*), B., Simon-Bouy(*), B., Kleefstra(*), T., Willemsen(*), M., Fryns(*), J. P., Devriendt(*), K., Ullmann(*), R., Vingron(*), M., Wrogemann(*), K., Wienker(*), T. F., Tzschach(*), A., van Bokhoven(*), H., Gecz(*), J., Jentsch, T. J., Chen(*), W., Ropers(*), H. H.; Kalscheuer(*), V. M.
Molecular psychiatry, 21:133-148
(2016)

Tags: Physiology and Pathology of Ion Transport (Jentsch

Abstract: X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder. During the past two decades in excess of 100 X-chromosome ID genes have been identified. Yet, a large number of families mapping to the X-chromosome remained unresolved suggesting that more XLID genes or loci are yet to be identified. Here, we have investigated 405 unresolved families with XLID. We employed massively parallel sequencing of all X-chromosome exons in the index males. The majority of these males were previously tested negative for copy number variations and for mutations in a subset of known XLID genes by Sanger sequencing. In total, 745 X-chromosomal genes were screened. After stringent filtering, a total of 1297 non-recurrent exonic variants remained for prioritization. Co-segregation analysis of potential clinically relevant changes revealed that 80 families (20%) carried pathogenic variants in established XLID genes. In 19 families, we detected likely causative protein truncating and missense variants in 7 novel and validated XLID genes (CLCN4, CNKSR2, FRMPD4, KLHL15, LAS1L, RLIM and USP27X) and potentially deleterious variants in 2 novel candidate XLID genes (CDK16 and TAF1). We show that the CLCN4 and CNKSR2 variants impair protein functions as indicated by electrophysiological studies and altered differentiation of cultured primary neurons from Clcn4(-/-) mice or after mRNA knock-down. The newly identified and candidate XLID proteins belong to pathways and networks with established roles in cognitive function and intellectual disability in particular. We suggest that systematic sequencing of all X-chromosomal genes in a cohort of patients with genetic evidence for X-chromosome locus involvement may resolve up to 58% of Fragile X-negative cases.

A phosphoinositide conversion mechanism for exit from endosomes
Ketel, K., Krauss, M., Nicot(*), A. S., Puchkov, D., Wieffer(*), M., Müller(*), R., Subramanian(*), D., Schultz(*), C., Laporte(*), J.; Haucke, V.
Nature, 529:408-412
(2016)

Tags: Molecular Pharmacology and Cell Biology (Haucke), Cellular Imaging (Wiesner/Puchkov)

Abstract: Phosphoinositides are a minor class of short-lived membrane phospholipids that serve crucial functions in cell physiology ranging from cell signalling and motility to their role as signposts of compartmental membrane identity. Phosphoinositide 4-phosphates such as phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI(4)P) and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) are concentrated at the plasma membrane, on secretory organelles, and on lysosomes, whereas phosphoinositide 3-phosphates, most notably phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI(3)P), are a hallmark of the endosomal system. Directional membrane traffic between endosomal and secretory compartments, although inherently complex, therefore requires regulated phosphoinositide conversion. The molecular mechanism underlying this conversion of phosphoinositide identity during cargo exit from endosomes by exocytosis is unknown. Here we report that surface delivery of endosomal cargo requires hydrolysis of PI(3)P by the phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphatase MTM1, an enzyme whose loss of function leads to X-linked centronuclear myopathy (also called myotubular myopathy) in humans. Removal of endosomal PI(3)P by MTM1 is accompanied by phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase-2alpha (PI4K2alpha)-dependent generation of PI(4)P and recruitment of the exocyst tethering complex to enable membrane fusion. Our data establish a mechanism for phosphoinositide conversion from PI(3)P to PI(4)P at endosomes en route to the plasma membrane and suggest that defective phosphoinositide conversion at endosomes underlies X-linked centronuclear myopathy caused by mutation of MTM1 in humans.

Specific binding of a mutated fragment of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin to endothelial claudin-5 and its modulation of cerebral vascular permeability
Liao(*), Z., Yang(*), Z., Piontek, A., Eichner(*), M., Krause, G., Li(*), L., Piontek(*), J.; Zhang(*), J.
Neuroscience, 327:53-63
(2016)

Tags: Structural Bioinformatics and Protein Design (Krause, G.)

Abstract: The vertebrate blood-brain barrier (BBB) creates an obstacle for central nervous system-related drug delivery. Claudin-5 (Cldn5), expressed in large quantities in BBB, plays a vital role in restricting BBB permeability. The C-terminal domain of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (cCPE) has been verified as binding to a subset of claudins (Cldns). The Cldn5-binding cCPE194-319 variant cCPEY306W/S313H was applied in this study to investigate its ability to modulate the permeability of zebrafish larval BBB. In vitro results showed that cCPEY306W/S313H is able to bind specifically to Cldn5 in murine brain vascular endothelial (bEnd.3) cells, and is transported along with Cldn5 from the cell membrane to the cytoplasm, which in turn results in a reduction in transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER). Conversely, this effect can be reversed by removal of cCPEY306W/S313H. In an in vivo experiment, this study estimates the capability of cCPEY306W/S313H to modulate Cldn5 using a rhodamine B-Dextran dye diffusion assay in zebrafish larval BBB. The results show that cCPEY306W/S313H co-localized with Cldn5 in zebrafish cerebral vascular cells and modulated BBB permeability, resulting in dye leakage. Taken together, this study suggests that cCPEY306W/S313H has the capability - both in vitro and in vivo - to modulate BBB permeability temporarily by specific binding to Cldn5.

The Use of a Combination of RDC and Chiroptical Spectroscopy for Determination of the Absolute Configuration of Fusariumin A from the Fungus Fusarium sp
Liu(*), L. Y., Sun, H., Griesinger(*), C.; Liu(*), J. K.
Natural products and bioprospecting, 6:41-48
(2016)

Tags: Computational Chemistry and Protein Design (Kühne)

Abstract: A new alkylpyrrole derivative, fusariumin A (1), was isolated from the culture broth of the fungus Fusarium sp. The absolute configuration of fuasiumin A has been established as (2'R,3'R) using a combination of RDC (residual dipolar coupling)-based NMR and DFT-supported chiroptical spectroscopy. It is worth to note that in this study without the aid of the RDC analysis, an unambiguous determination of configuration and conformation was not feasible due to the excessive conformational possibilities of this open-chain compound.

Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis of Surface Modified Cellulose Utilizing TGA-MS
Loof(*), D., Hiller, M., Oschkinat, H.; Koschek(*), K.
Materials (Basel, Switzerland), 9
(2016)

Tags: NMR-Supported Structural Biology (Oschkinat)

Abstract: With the aim to enhance interfacial adhesion of a hydrophobic polymer matrix and cellulosic fibers and fillers, chemical surface modifications with silane coupling agents are performed. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) could be used to determine the degree of surface functionalization. However, similar thermal properties of treated and untreated cellulose hamper a precise determination of silane loading. This contribution deals with quantitative determination of silane loading combining both TGA and elemental analysis. Firstly, silane modified celluloses were studied by FT-IR, Raman, solid state NMR spectroscopy, and polarized light microscopy in order to determine functional groups and to study the impact of chemical treatment on cellulose morphology. Secondly, thermal stability and pyrolysis processes were studied by TG-MS analysis. In order to determine the exact silane loading, the mass percentages of the appropriate elements were quantified by elemental analysis and correlated with the charred residues determined by TGA yielding a linear dependency. With that correlation, it was possible to determine silane loadings for additional samples utilizing simple TGA measurements. The main advantage of that approach is that only one calibration is necessary for routine analyses of further samples and TGA-MS coupling gives additional information on thermal stability and pyrolysis routes, simultaneously.

Type II PI4-kinases control Weibel-Palade body biogenesis and von Willebrand factor structure in human endothelial cells
Lopes da Silva(*), M., O'Connor(*), M. N., Kriston-Vizi(*), J., White(*), I. J., Al-Shawi(*), R., Simons(*), J. P., Mössinger, J., Haucke, V.; Cutler(*), D. F.
J Cell Sci, 129:2096-2105
(2016)

Tags: Molecular Pharmacology and Cell Biology (Haucke)

Abstract: Weibel-Palade bodies (WPBs) are endothelial storage organelles that mediate the release of molecules involved in thrombosis, inflammation and angiogenesis, including the pro-thrombotic glycoprotein von Willebrand factor (VWF). Although many protein components required for WPB formation and function have been identified, the role of lipids is almost unknown. We examined two key phosphatidylinositol kinases that control phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate levels at the trans-Golgi network, the site of WPB biogenesis. RNA interference of the type II phosphatidylinositol 4-kinases PI4KIIalpha and PI4KIIbeta in primary human endothelial cells leads to formation of an increased proportion of short WPB with perturbed packing of VWF, as exemplified by increased exposure of antibody-binding sites. When stimulated with histamine, these cells release normal levels of VWF yet, under flow, form very few platelet-catching VWF strings. In PI4KIIalpha-deficient mice, immuno-microscopy revealed that VWF packaging is also perturbed and these mice exhibit increased blood loss after tail cut compared to controls. This is the first demonstration that lipid kinases can control the biosynthesis of VWF and the formation of WPBs that are capable of full haemostatic function.

De novo and inherited mutations in the X-linked gene CLCN4 are associated with syndromic intellectual disability and behavior and seizure disorders in males and females
Palmer(*), E. E., Stuhlmann, T., Weinert, S., Haan(*), E., Van Esch(*), H., Holvoet(*), M., Boyle(*), J., Leffler(*), M., Raynaud(*), M., Moraine(*), C., van Bokhoven(*), H., Kleefstra(*), T., Kahrizi(*), K., Najmabadi(*), H., Ropers(*), H. H., Delgado(*), M. R., Sirsi(*), D., Golla(*), S., Sommer(*), A., Pietryga(*), M. P., Chung(*), W. K., Wynn(*), J., Rohena(*), L., Bernardo(*), E., Hamlin(*), D., Faux(*), B. M., Grange(*), D. K., Manwaring(*), L., Tolmie(*), J., Joss(*), S., Cobben(*), J. M., Duijkers(*), F. A., Goehringer(*), J. M., Challman(*), T. D., Hennig(*), F., Fischer(*), U., Grimme(*), A., Suckow(*), V., Musante(*), L., Nicholl(*), J., Shaw(*), M., Lodh(*), S. P., Niu(*), Z., Rosenfeld(*), J. A., Stankiewicz(*), P., Jentsch, T. J., Gecz(*), J., Field(*), M.; Kalscheuer(*), V. M.
Molecular psychiatry,
(2016)

Tags: Physiology and Pathology of Ion Transport (Jentsch)

Abstract: Variants in CLCN4, which encodes the chloride/hydrogen ion exchanger CIC-4 prominently expressed in brain, were recently described to cause X-linked intellectual disability and epilepsy. We present detailed phenotypic information on 52 individuals from 16 families with CLCN4-related disorder: 5 affected females and 2 affected males with a de novo variant in CLCN4 (6 individuals previously unreported) and 27 affected males, 3 affected females and 15 asymptomatic female carriers from 9 families with inherited CLCN4 variants (4 families previously unreported). Intellectual disability ranged from borderline to profound. Behavioral and psychiatric disorders were common in both child- and adulthood, and included autistic features, mood disorders, obsessive-compulsive behaviors and hetero- and autoaggression. Epilepsy was common, with severity ranging from epileptic encephalopathy to well-controlled seizures. Several affected individuals showed white matter changes on cerebral neuroimaging and progressive neurological symptoms, including movement disorders and spasticity. Heterozygous females can be as severely affected as males. The variability of symptoms in females is not correlated with the X inactivation pattern studied in their blood. The mutation spectrum includes frameshift, missense and splice site variants and one single-exon deletion. All missense variants were predicted to affect CLCN4's function based on in silico tools and either segregated with the phenotype in the family or were de novo. Pathogenicity of all previously unreported missense variants was further supported by electrophysiological studies in Xenopus laevis oocytes. We compare CLCN4-related disorder with conditions related to dysfunction of other members of the CLC family.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 23 August 2016; doi:10.1038/mp.2016.135.

Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Provides New Insights into Chromophore Structure in Phytochrome Photoreceptors
Stöppler, D., Song(*), C., van Rossum, B. J., Geiger, M. A., Lang(*), C., Mroginski(*), M. A., Jagtap(*), A. P., Sigurdsson(*), S. T., Matysik(*), J., Hughes(*), J.; Oschkinat, H.
Angew Chem Int Ed Engl, 55:16017-16020
(2016)

Tags: NMR-Supported Structural Biology (Oschkinat)

Abstract: Phytochromes are red/far-red photochromic photoreceptors acting as master regulators of development in higher plants, thereby controlling transcription of about 20 % of their genes. Light-induced isomerization of the bilin chromophore leads to large rearrangements in protein structure, whereby the role of protonation dynamics and charge distribution is of particular interest. To help unravel the inherent mechanisms, we present two-dimensional dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) enhanced solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectra of the functional sensory module of the cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1. To this end, the pyrrole ring nitrogen signals were assigned unequivocally, enabling us to locate the positive charge of the phycocyanobilin (PCB) chromophore. To help analyze proton exchange pathways, the proximity of PCB ring nitrogen atoms and functionally relevant H2 O molecules was also determined. Our study demonstrates the value of DNP in biological solid-state MAS NMR spectroscopy.

An Alignment Medium for Measuring Residual Dipolar Couplings in Pure DMSO: Liquid Crystals from Graphene Oxide Grafted with Polymer Brushes
Zong(*), W., Li(*), G. W., Cao(*), J. M., Lei(*), X., Hu(*), M. L., Sun, H., Griesinger(*), C.; Tan(*), R. X.
Angew Chem Int Ed Engl, 55:3690-3693
(2016)

Tags: Computational Chemistry and Protein Design (Kühne)

Abstract: Residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) have attracted attention in light of their great impact on the structural elucidation of organic molecules. However, the effectiveness of RDC measurements is limited by the shortage of alignment media compatible with widely used organic solvents, such as DMSO. Herein, we present the first liquid crystal (LC) based alignment medium that is compatible with pure DMSO, thus enabling RDC measurements of polar and intermediate polarity molecules. The liquid crystals were obtained by grafting polymer brushes onto graphene oxide (GO) using free radical polymerization. The resulting new medium offers several advantages, such as absence of background signals, narrow line shapes, and tunable alignment. Importantly, this medium is compatible with pi-conjugated molecules. Moreover, sonication-induced fragmentation can reduce the size of GO sheets. The resulting anisotropic medium has moderate alignment strength, which is a prerequisite for an accurate RDC measurement.

Page:  
Previous | 1, 2, 3 | Next
Export as:
BibTeX, XML

Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (FMP)
Campus Berlin-Buch
Robert-Roessle-Str. 10
13125 Berlin, Germany
+4930 94793 - 100 
+4930 94793 - 109 (Fax)
info(at)fmp-berlin.de

Like many sites, we use cookies to optimize the user's browsing experience. Data Protection OK