FMP Publications

Our publications are recorded in a searchable database since 2010, updates will be added regularly.

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References
Bacteriophage Tail-Tube Assembly Studied by Proton-Detected 4D Solid-State NMR
Zinke, M., Fricke, P., Samson(*), C., Hwang, S., Wall(*), J. S., Lange, S., Zinn-Justin(*), S.; Lange, A.
Angew Chem Int Ed Engl,
(2017)

Tags: Molecular Biophysics (Lange, A.)

Abstract: Obtaining unambiguous resonance assignments remains a major bottleneck in solid-state NMR studies of protein structure and dynamics. Particularly for supramolecular assemblies with large subunits (>150 residues), the analysis of crowded spectral data presents a challenge, even if three-dimensional (3D) spectra are used. Here, we present a proton-detected 4D solid-state NMR assignment procedure that is tailored for large assemblies. The key to recording 4D spectra with three indirect carbon or nitrogen dimensions with their inherently large chemical shift dispersion lies in the use of sparse non-uniform sampling (as low as 2 %). As a proof of principle, we acquired 4D (H)COCANH, (H)CACONH, and (H)CBCANH spectra of the 20 kDa bacteriophage tail-tube protein gp17.1 in a total time of two and a half weeks. These spectra were sufficient to obtain complete resonance assignments in a straightforward manner without use of previous solution NMR data.

Reconstitution of Nucleosomes with Differentially Isotope-labeled Sister Histones
Liokatis, S.
J Vis Exp,
(2017)

Tags: In-Cell NMR (Selenko)

Abstract: Asymmetrically modified nucleosomes contain the two copies of a histone (sister histones) decorated with distinct sets of Post-translational Modifications (PTMs). They are newly identified species with unknown means of establishment and functional implications. Current analytical methods are inadequate to detect the copy-specific occurrence of PTMs on the nucleosomal sister histones. This protocol presents a biochemical method for the in vitro reconstitution of nucleosomes containing differentially isotope-labeled sister histones. The generated complex can be also asymmetrically modified, after including a premodified histone pool during refolding of histone subcomplexes. These asymmetric nucleosome preparations can be readily reacted with histone-modifying enzymes to study modification cross-talk mechanisms imposed by the asymmetrically pre-incorporated PTM using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Particularly, the modification reactions in real-time can be mapped independently on the two sister histones by performing different types of NMR correlation experiments, tailored for the respective isotope type. This methodology provides the means to study crosstalk mechanisms that contribute to the formation and propagation of asymmetric PTM patterns on nucleosomal complexes.

Small Molecules Targeting Human N-Acetylmannosamine Kinase
Hinderlich(*), S., Neuenschwander, M., Wratil(*), P. R., Oder, A., Lisurek, M., Nguyen(*), L. D., von Kries, J. P.; Hackenberger, C. P. R.
Chembiochem,
(2017)

Tags: Chemical Biology II (Hackenberger), Screening Unit ( von Kries)

Abstract: N-Acetylmannosamine kinase (MNK) plays a key role in the biosynthesis of sialic acids and glycosylation of proteins. Sialylated glycoconjugates affect a large number of biological processes, including immune modulation and cancer transformation. In search of effective inhibitors of MNK we applied high-throughput screening of drug-like small molecules. By applying different orthogonal assays for their validation we identified four potential MNK-specific inhibitors with IC50 values in the low-micromolar range. Molecular modelling of the inhibitors into the active site of MNK supports their binding to the sugar or the ATP-binding pocket of the enzyme or both. These compounds are promising for downregulation of the sialic acid content of glycoconjugates and for studying the functional contribution of sialic acids to disease development.

A Two-Component Adhesive: Tau Fibrils Arise from a Combination of a Well-Defined Motif and Conformationally Flexible Interactions
Xiang(*), S. Q., Kulminskaya(*), N., Habenstein(*), B., Biernat(*), J., Tepper(*), K., Paulat(*), M., Griesinger(*), C., Becker(*), S., Lange, A., Mandelkow(*), E.; Linser(*), R.
J. Am. Chem. Soc., 139:2639-2646
(2017)

Tags: Molecular Biophysics (Lange, A.)

Abstract: Fibrillar aggregates of A beta and Tau in the brain are the major hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. Most Tau fibers have a twisted appearance, but the twist can be variable and even absent. This ambiguity, which has also been associated with different phenotypes of tauopathies, has led to controversial assumptions about fibril constitution, and it is unclear to-date what the molecular causes of this polymorphism are. To tackle this question, we used solid-state NMR strategies providing assignments of non-seeded three-repeat-domain Tau(3RD) with an inherent heterogeneity. This is in contrast to the general approach to characterize the most homogeneous preparations by construct truncation or intricate seeding protocols. Here, carbon and nitrogen chemical-shift conservation between fibrils revealed invariable secondary-structure properties, however, with inter-monomer interactions variable among samples. Residues with variable amide shifts are localized mostly to N- and C-terminal regions within the rigid beta structure in the repeat region of Tau(3RD). By contrast, the hexapeptide motif in repeat R3, a crucial motif for fibril formation, shows strikingly low variability of all NMR parameters: Starting as a nucleation site for monomer monomer contacts, this six-residue sequence element also turns into a well-defined structural element upon fibril formation. Given the absence of external causes in vitro, the interplay of structurally differently conserved elements in this protein likely reflects an intrinsic property of Tau fibrils.

An air-liquid interphase approach for modeling the early embryo-maternal contact zone
Chen(*), S., Palma-Vera(*), S. E., Langhammer(*), M., Galuska(*), S. P., Braun(*), B. C., Krause, E., Lucas-Hahn(*), A.; Schoen(*), J.
Sci Rep, 7:42298
(2017)

Tags: Mass Spectrometry (Krause, E.)

Abstract: We developed an air-liquid interphase culture procedure for mammalian oviduct epithelial cells leading to the formation of functional epithelial tissues, which generate oviduct fluid surrogates. These in vitro oviduct epithelia can be co-cultured with living zygotes and enable embryonic development up to the blastocyst stage without addition of embryo culture medium. The described strategy is broadly applicable to analyze early embryo-maternal interactions under standardized in vitro conditions.

Measurement of backbone hydrogen-deuterium exchange in the type III secretion system needle protein PrgI by solid-state NMR
Chevelkov, V., Giller(*), K., Becker(*), S.; Lange, A.
J Magn Reson, 283:110-116
(2017)

Tags: Molecular Biophysics (Lange, A.)

Abstract: In this report we present site-specific measurements of amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange rates in a protein in the solid state phase by MAS NMR. Employing perdeuteration, proton detection and a high external magnetic field we could adopt the highly efficient Relax-EXSY protocol previously developed for liquid state NMR. According to this method, we measured the contribution of hydrogen exchange on apparent 15N longitudinal relaxation rates in samples with differing D2O buffer content. Differences in the apparent T1 times allowed us to derive exchange rates for multiple residues in the type III secretion system needle protein.

Backbone assignment of perdeuterated proteins by solid-state NMR using proton detection and ultrafast magic-angle spinning
Fricke, P., Chevelkov, V., Zinke, M., Giller(*), K., Becker(*), S.; Lange, A.
Nat Protoc, 12:764-782
(2017)

Tags: Molecular Biophysics (Lange, A.)

Abstract: Solid-state NMR (ssNMR) is a technique that allows the study of protein structure and dynamics at atomic detail. In contrast to X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy, proteins can be studied under physiological conditions-for example, in a lipid bilayer and at room temperature (0-35 degrees C). However, ssNMR requires considerable amounts (milligram quantities) of isotopically labeled samples. In recent years, 1H-detection of perdeuterated protein samples has been proposed as a method of alleviating the sensitivity issue. Such methods are, however, substantially more demanding to the spectroscopist, as compared with traditional 13C-detected approaches. As a guide, this protocol describes a procedure for the chemical shift assignment of the backbone atoms of proteins in the solid state by 1H-detected ssNMR. It requires a perdeuterated, uniformly 13C- and 15N-labeled protein sample with subsequent proton back-exchange to the labile sites. The sample needs to be spun at a minimum of 40 kHz in the NMR spectrometer. With a minimal set of five 3D NMR spectra, the protein backbone and some of the side-chain atoms can be completely assigned. These spectra correlate resonances within one amino acid residue and between neighboring residues; taken together, these correlations allow for complete chemical shift assignment via a 'backbone walk'. This results in a backbone chemical shift table, which is the basis for further analysis of the protein structure and/or dynamics by ssNMR. Depending on the spectral quality and complexity of the protein, data acquisition and analysis are possible within 2 months.

Emerin self-assembly mechanism: role of the LEM domain
Samson(*), C., Celli(*), F., Hendriks, K., Zinke, M., Essawy(*), N., Herrada(*), I., Arteni(*), A. A., Theillet(*), F. X., Alpha-Bazin(*), B., Armengaud(*), J., Coirault(*), C., Lange, A.; Zinn-Justin(*), S.
Febs J, 284:338-352
(2017)

Tags: Molecular Biophysics (Lange, A.)

Abstract: At the nuclear envelope, the inner nuclear membrane protein emerin contributes to the interface between the nucleoskeleton and the chromatin. Emerin is an essential actor of the nuclear response to a mechanical signal. Genetic defects in emerin cause Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy. It was proposed that emerin oligomerization regulates nucleoskeleton binding, and impaired oligomerization contributes to the loss of function of emerin disease-causing mutants. We here report the first structural characterization of emerin oligomers. We identified an N-terminal emerin region from amino acid 1 to amino acid 132 that is necessary and sufficient for formation of long curvilinear filaments. In emerin monomer, this region contains a globular LEM domain and a fragment that is intrinsically disordered. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance analysis identifies the LEM beta-fragment as part of the oligomeric structural core. However, the LEM domain alone does not self-assemble into filaments. Additional residues forming a beta-structure are observed within the filaments that could correspond to the unstructured region in emerin monomer. We show that the delK37 mutation causing muscular dystrophy triggers LEM domain unfolding and increases emerin self-assembly rate. Similarly, inserting a disulfide bridge that stabilizes the LEM folded state impairs emerin N-terminal region self-assembly, whereas reducing this disulfide bridge triggers self-assembly. We conclude that the LEM domain, responsible for binding to the chromatin protein BAF, undergoes a conformational change during self-assembly of emerin N-terminal region. The consequences of these structural rearrangement and self-assembly events on emerin binding properties are discussed.

Small-molecule inhibition of STOML3 oligomerization reverses pathological mechanical hypersensitivity
Wetzel(*), C., Pifferi(*), S., Picci(*), C., Gök(*), C., Hoffmann(*), D., Bali(*), K. K., Lampe, A., Lapatsina(*), L., Fleischer(*), R., Smith(*), E. S., Begay(*), V., Moroni(*), M., Estebanez(*), L., Kühnemund(*), J., Walcher(*), J., Specker, E., Neuenschwander, M., von Kries, J. P., Haucke, V., Kuner(*), R., Poulet(*), J. F., Schmoranzer(*), J., Poole(*), K.; Lewin(*), G. R.
Nat Neurosci, 20:209-218
(2017)

Tags: Molecular Pharmacology and Cell Biology (Haucke), Screening Unit (von Kries)

Abstract: The skin is equipped with specialized mechanoreceptors that allow the perception of the slightest brush. Indeed, some mechanoreceptors can detect even nanometer-scale movements. Movement is transformed into electrical signals via the gating of mechanically activated ion channels at sensory endings in the skin. The sensitivity of Piezo mechanically gated ion channels is controlled by stomatin-like protein-3 (STOML3), which is required for normal mechanoreceptor function. Here we identify small-molecule inhibitors of STOML3 oligomerization that reversibly reduce the sensitivity of mechanically gated currents in sensory neurons and silence mechanoreceptors in vivo. STOML3 inhibitors in the skin also reversibly attenuate fine touch perception in normal mice. Under pathophysiological conditions following nerve injury or diabetic neuropathy, the slightest touch can produce pain, and here STOML3 inhibitors can reverse mechanical hypersensitivity. Thus, small molecules applied locally to the skin can be used to modulate touch and may represent peripherally available drugs to treat tactile-driven pain following neuropathy.

Selective transport of neurotransmitters and modulators by distinct volume-regulated LRRC8 anion channels
Lutter, D., Ullrich, F., Lueck, J. C., Kempa(*), S.; Jentsch, T. J.
J Cell Sci, 130:1122-1133
(2017)

Tags: Physiology and Pathology of Ion Transport (Jentsch)

Abstract: In response to swelling, mammalian cells release chloride and organic osmolytes through volume-regulated anion channels (VRACs). VRACs are heteromers of LRRC8A and other LRRC8 isoforms (LRRC8B to LRRC8E), which are co-expressed in HEK293 and most other cells. The spectrum of VRAC substrates and its dependence on particular LRRC8 isoforms remains largely unknown. We show that, besides the osmolytes taurine and myo-inositol, LRRC8 channels transport the neurotransmitters glutamate, aspartate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and the co-activator D-serine. HEK293 cells engineered to express defined subsets of LRRC8 isoforms were used to elucidate the subunit-dependence of transport. Whereas LRRC8D was crucial for the translocation of overall neutral compounds like myo-inositol, taurine and GABA, and sustained the transport of positively charged lysine, flux of negatively charged aspartate was equally well supported by LRRC8E. Disruption of LRRC8B or LRRC8C failed to decrease the transport rates of all investigated substrates, but their inclusion into LRRC8 heteromers influenced the substrate preference of VRAC. This suggested that individual VRACs can contain three or more different LRRC8 subunits, a conclusion confirmed by sequential co-immunoprecipitations. Our work suggests a composition-dependent role of VRACs in extracellular signal transduction.

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Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (FMP)
Campus Berlin-Buch
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13125 Berlin, Germany
+4930 94793 - 100 
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info(at)fmp-berlin.de

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