FMP Publications

Our publications are recorded in a searchable database since 2010, updates will be added regularly.

Year:  
All :: 2010, ... , 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017
Author:  
All :: (, A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W, X, Y, Z 
All :: Ma(*), ... , Merk(*), Merlo(*), Mertins(*), ... , Mylona(*) 
Preferences: 
References per page: Show keywords Show abstracts
References
Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Enhanced MAS NMR Spectroscopy for Structural Analysis of HIV-1 Protein Assemblies
Gupta(*), R., Lu(*), M., Hou(*), G., Caporini(*), M. A., Rosay(*), M., Maas(*), W., Struppe(*), J., Suiter(*), C., Ahn(*), J., Byeon(*), I. J., Franks, W. T., Orwick-Rydmark, M., Bertarello(*), A., Oschkinat, H., Lesage(*), A., Pintacuda(*), G., Gronenborn(*), A. M.; Polenova(*), T.
J Phys Chem B, 120:329-339
(2016)

Tags: NMR-Supported Structural Biology (Oschkinat)

Abstract: Mature infectious HIV-1 virions contain conical capsids composed of CA protein, generated by the proteolytic cleavage cascade of the Gag polyprotein, termed maturation. The mechanism of capsid core formation through the maturation process remains poorly understood. We present DNP-enhanced MAS NMR studies of tubular assemblies of CA and Gag CA-SP1 maturation intermediate and report 20-64-fold sensitivity enhancements due to DNP at 14.1 T. These sensitivity enhancements enabled direct observation of spacer peptide 1 (SP1) resonances in CA-SP1 by dipolar-based correlation experiments, unequivocally indicating that the SP1 peptide is unstructured in assembled CA-SP1 at cryogenic temperatures, corroborating our earlier results. Furthermore, the dependence of DNP enhancements and spectral resolution on magnetic field strength (9.4-18.8 T) and temperature (109-180 K) was investigated. Our results suggest that DNP-based measurements could potentially provide residue-specific dynamics information by allowing for the extraction of the temperature dependence of the anisotropic tensorial or relaxation parameters. With DNP, we were able to detect multiple well-resolved isoleucine side-chain conformers; unique intermolecular correlations across two CA molecules; and functionally relevant conformationally disordered states such as the 14-residue SP1 peptide, none of which are visible at ambient temperatures. The detection of isolated conformers and intermolecular correlations can provide crucial constraints for structure determination of these assemblies. Overall, our results establish DNP-based MAS NMR spectroscopy as an excellent tool for the characterization of HIV-1 assemblies.

X-exome sequencing of 405 unresolved families identifies seven novel intellectual disability genes
Hu(*), H., Haas(*), S. A., Chelly(*), J., Van Esch(*), H., Raynaud(*), M., de Brouwer(*), A. P., Weinert, S., Froyen(*), G., Frints(*), S. G., Laumonnier, F., Zemojtel(*), T., Love(*), M. I., Richard(*), H., Emde(*), A. K., Bienek(*), M., Jensen(*), C., Hambrock(*), M., Fischer(*), U., Langnick(*), C., Feldkamp(*), M., Wissink-Lindhout(*), W., Lebrun(*), N., Castelnau(*), L., Rucci(*), J., Montjean(*), R., Dorseuil(*), O., Billuart(*), P., Stuhlmann, T., Shaw(*), M., Corbett(*), M. A., Gardner(*), A., Willis-Owen(*), S., Tan(*), C., Friend(*), K. L., Belet(*), S., van Roozendaal(*), K. E., Jimenez-Pocquet(*), M., Moizard(*), M. P., Ronce(*), N., Sun(*), R., O'Keeffe(*), S., Chenna(*), R., van Bommel(*), A., Goke(*), J., Hackett(*), A., Field(*), M., Christie(*), L., Boyle(*), J., Haan(*), E., Nelson(*), J., Turner(*), G., Baynam(*), G., Gillessen-Kaesbach(*), G., Müller, U., Steinberger(*), D., Budny(*), B., Badura-Stronka(*), M., Latos-Bielenska(*), A., Ousager(*), L. B., Wieacker(*), P., Rodriguez Criado(*), G., Bondeson(*), M. L., Anneren(*), G., Dufke(*), A., Cohen(*), M., Van Maldergem(*), L., Vincent-Delorme(*), C., Echenne(*), B., Simon-Bouy(*), B., Kleefstra(*), T., Willemsen(*), M., Fryns(*), J. P., Devriendt(*), K., Ullmann(*), R., Vingron(*), M., Wrogemann(*), K., Wienker(*), T. F., Tzschach(*), A., van Bokhoven(*), H., Gecz(*), J., Jentsch, T. J., Chen(*), W., Ropers(*), H. H.; Kalscheuer(*), V. M.
Molecular psychiatry, 21:133-148
(2016)

Tags: Physiology and Pathology of Ion Transport (Jentsch

Abstract: X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder. During the past two decades in excess of 100 X-chromosome ID genes have been identified. Yet, a large number of families mapping to the X-chromosome remained unresolved suggesting that more XLID genes or loci are yet to be identified. Here, we have investigated 405 unresolved families with XLID. We employed massively parallel sequencing of all X-chromosome exons in the index males. The majority of these males were previously tested negative for copy number variations and for mutations in a subset of known XLID genes by Sanger sequencing. In total, 745 X-chromosomal genes were screened. After stringent filtering, a total of 1297 non-recurrent exonic variants remained for prioritization. Co-segregation analysis of potential clinically relevant changes revealed that 80 families (20%) carried pathogenic variants in established XLID genes. In 19 families, we detected likely causative protein truncating and missense variants in 7 novel and validated XLID genes (CLCN4, CNKSR2, FRMPD4, KLHL15, LAS1L, RLIM and USP27X) and potentially deleterious variants in 2 novel candidate XLID genes (CDK16 and TAF1). We show that the CLCN4 and CNKSR2 variants impair protein functions as indicated by electrophysiological studies and altered differentiation of cultured primary neurons from Clcn4(-/-) mice or after mRNA knock-down. The newly identified and candidate XLID proteins belong to pathways and networks with established roles in cognitive function and intellectual disability in particular. We suggest that systematic sequencing of all X-chromosomal genes in a cohort of patients with genetic evidence for X-chromosome locus involvement may resolve up to 58% of Fragile X-negative cases.

Design and comparison of exchange spectroscopy approaches to cryptophane-xenon host-guest kinetics
Korchak(*), S., Kilian(*), W., Schröder, L.; Mitschang(*), L.
J Magn Reson, 265:139-145
(2016)

Tags: Molecular Imaging (Schröder)

Abstract: Exchange spectroscopy is used in combination with a variation of xenon concentration to disentangle the kinetics of the reversible binding of xenon to cryptophane-A. The signal intensity of either free or crytophane-bound xenon decays in a manner characteristic of the underlying exchange reactions when the spins in the other pool are perturbed. Three experimental approaches, including the well-known Hyper-CEST method, are shown to effectively entail a simple linear dependence of the signal depletion rate, or of a related quantity, on free xenon concentration. This occurs when using spin pool saturation or inversion followed by free exchange. The identification and quantification of contributions to the binding kinetics is then straightforward: in the depletion rate plot, the intercept at the vanishing free xenon concentration represents the kinetic rate coefficient for xenon detachment from the host by dissociative processes while the slope is indicative of the kinetic rate coefficient for degenerate exchange reactions. Comparing quantified kinetic rates for hyperpolarized xenon in aqueous solution reveals the high accuracy of each approach but also shows differences in the precision of the numerical results and in the requirements for prior knowledge. Because of their broad range of applicability the proposed exchange spectroscopy experiments can be readily used to unravel the kinetics of complex formation of xenon with host molecules in the various situations appearing in practice.

Phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphates-at the interface between cell signalling and membrane traffic
Marat, A. L.; Haucke, V.
EMBO J, 35:561-579
(2016)

Tags: Molecular Pharmacology and Cell Biology (Haucke)

Abstract: Phosphoinositides (PIs) form a minor class of phospholipids with crucial functions in cell physiology, ranging from cell signalling and motility to a role as signposts of compartmental membrane identity. Phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphates are present at the plasma membrane and within the endolysosomal system, where they serve as key regulators of both cell signalling and of intracellular membrane traffic. Here, we provide an overview of the metabolic pathways that regulate cellular synthesis of PI 3-phosphates at distinct intracellular sites and discuss the mechanisms by which these lipids regulate cell signalling and membrane traffic. Finally, we provide a framework for how PI 3-phosphate metabolism is integrated into the cellular network.

Tubular Epithelial NF-kappaB Activity Regulates Ischemic AKI
Marko(*), L., Vigolo(*), E., Hinze(*), C., Park(*), J. K., Roel(*), G., Balogh(*), A., Choi(*), M., Wübken(*), A., Cording, J., Blasig, I. E., Luft(*), F. C., Scheidereit(*), C., Schmidt-Ott(*), K. M., Schmidt-Ullrich(*), R.; Müller(*), D. N.
Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : JASN, 27:2658-2669
(2016)

Tags: Molecular Cell Physiology (Blasig, I.E.)

Abstract: NF-kappaB is a key regulator of innate and adaptive immunity and is implicated in the pathogenesis of AKI. The cell type-specific functions of NF-kappaB in the kidney are unknown; however, the pathway serves distinct functions in immune and tissue parenchymal cells. We analyzed tubular epithelial-specific NF-kappaB signaling in a mouse model of ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI)-induced AKI. NF-kappaB reporter activity and nuclear localization of phosphorylated NF-kappaB subunit p65 analyses in mice revealed that IRI induced widespread NF-kappaB activation in renal tubular epithelia and in interstitial cells that peaked 2-3 days after injury. To genetically antagonize tubular epithelial NF-kappaB activity, we generated mice expressing the human NF-kappaB super-repressor IkappaBalphaDeltaN in renal proximal, distal, and collecting duct epithelial cells. Compared with control mice, these mice exhibited improved renal function, reduced tubular apoptosis, and attenuated neutrophil and macrophage infiltration after IRI-induced AKI. Furthermore, tubular NF-kappaB-dependent gene expression profiles revealed temporally distinct functional gene clusters for apoptosis, chemotaxis, and morphogenesis. Primary proximal tubular cells isolated from IkappaBalphaDeltaN-expressing mice and exposed to hypoxia-mimetic agent cobalt chloride exhibited less apoptosis and expressed lower levels of chemokines than cells from control mice did. Our results indicate that postischemic NF-kappaB activation in renal tubular epithelia aggravates tubular injury and exacerbates a maladaptive inflammatory response.

In-Cell Protein Structures from 2D NMR Experiments
Müntener(*), T., Haussinger(*), D., Selenko, P.; Theillet, F. X.
J Phys Chem Lett, 7:2821-2825
(2016)

Tags: In-Cell NMR (Selenko)

Abstract: In-cell NMR spectroscopy provides atomic resolution insights into the structural properties of proteins in cells, but it is rarely used to solve entire protein structures de novo. Here, we introduce a paramagnetic lanthanide-tag to simultaneously measure protein pseudocontact shifts (PCSs) and residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) to be used as input for structure calculation routines within the Rosetta program. We employ this approach to determine the structure of the protein G B1 domain (GB1) in intact Xenopus laevis oocytes from a single set of 2D in-cell NMR experiments. Specifically, we derive well-defined GB1 ensembles from low concentration in-cell NMR samples ( approximately 50 muM) measured at moderate magnetic field strengths (600 MHz), thus offering an easily accessible alternative for determining intracellular protein structures.

Opposing effects of Elk-1 multisite phosphorylation shape its response to ERK activation
Mylona(*), A., Theillet, F. X., Foster(*), C., Cheng(*), T. M., Miralles(*), F., Bates(*), P. A., Selenko, P.; Treisman(*), R.
Science, 354:233-237
(2016)

Tags: In-Cell NMR (Selenko)

Abstract: Multisite phosphorylation regulates many transcription factors, including the serum response factor partner Elk-1. Phosphorylation of the transcriptional activation domain (TAD) of Elk-1 by the protein kinase ERK at multiple sites potentiates recruitment of the Mediator transcriptional coactivator complex and transcriptional activation, but the roles of individual phosphorylation events had remained unclear. Using time-resolved nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we found that ERK2 phosphorylation proceeds at markedly different rates at eight TAD sites in vitro, which we classified as fast, intermediate, and slow. Mutagenesis experiments showed that phosphorylation of fast and intermediate sites promoted Mediator interaction and transcriptional activation, whereas modification of slow sites counteracted both functions, thereby limiting Elk-1 output. Progressive Elk-1 phosphorylation thus ensures a self-limiting response to ERK activation, which occurs independently of antagonizing phosphatase activity.

Bis(arylmethyl)-substituted unsymmetrical phosphites for the synthesis of lipidated peptides via Staudinger-phosphite reactions
Nischan, N., Kasper, M. A., Mathew(*), T.; Hackenberger, C. P.
Org Biomol Chem, 14:7500-7508
(2016)

Tags: Chemical Biology II (Hackenberger)

Abstract: With this study we introduce new unsymmetrical phosphites to obtain lipidated peptide-conjugates starting from easily accessible azide-modified amino acid or peptide precursors. For this purpose, we investigated which substituents at alkyl phosphites lead to the highest formation of mono-alkylated phosphoramidate peptides. We found that phosphites containing one alkyl-chain and two picolyl or benzyl-substituents delivered alkyl phosphoramidate-conjugates in high yields, which also allowed a chemoselective lipidation of an unprotected azido polypeptide. Finally, monolipidated phosphoramidate peptides obtained by the unsymmetrical Staudinger phosphite reaction led to the formation of micelle-like structures and cellular uptake.

De novo and inherited mutations in the X-linked gene CLCN4 are associated with syndromic intellectual disability and behavior and seizure disorders in males and females
Palmer(*), E. E., Stuhlmann, T., Weinert, S., Haan(*), E., Van Esch(*), H., Holvoet(*), M., Boyle(*), J., Leffler(*), M., Raynaud(*), M., Moraine(*), C., van Bokhoven(*), H., Kleefstra(*), T., Kahrizi(*), K., Najmabadi(*), H., Ropers(*), H. H., Delgado(*), M. R., Sirsi(*), D., Golla(*), S., Sommer(*), A., Pietryga(*), M. P., Chung(*), W. K., Wynn(*), J., Rohena(*), L., Bernardo(*), E., Hamlin(*), D., Faux(*), B. M., Grange(*), D. K., Manwaring(*), L., Tolmie(*), J., Joss(*), S., Cobben(*), J. M., Duijkers(*), F. A., Goehringer(*), J. M., Challman(*), T. D., Hennig(*), F., Fischer(*), U., Grimme(*), A., Suckow(*), V., Musante(*), L., Nicholl(*), J., Shaw(*), M., Lodh(*), S. P., Niu(*), Z., Rosenfeld(*), J. A., Stankiewicz(*), P., Jentsch, T. J., Gecz(*), J., Field(*), M.; Kalscheuer(*), V. M.
Molecular psychiatry,
(2016)

Tags: Physiology and Pathology of Ion Transport (Jentsch)

Abstract: Variants in CLCN4, which encodes the chloride/hydrogen ion exchanger CIC-4 prominently expressed in brain, were recently described to cause X-linked intellectual disability and epilepsy. We present detailed phenotypic information on 52 individuals from 16 families with CLCN4-related disorder: 5 affected females and 2 affected males with a de novo variant in CLCN4 (6 individuals previously unreported) and 27 affected males, 3 affected females and 15 asymptomatic female carriers from 9 families with inherited CLCN4 variants (4 families previously unreported). Intellectual disability ranged from borderline to profound. Behavioral and psychiatric disorders were common in both child- and adulthood, and included autistic features, mood disorders, obsessive-compulsive behaviors and hetero- and autoaggression. Epilepsy was common, with severity ranging from epileptic encephalopathy to well-controlled seizures. Several affected individuals showed white matter changes on cerebral neuroimaging and progressive neurological symptoms, including movement disorders and spasticity. Heterozygous females can be as severely affected as males. The variability of symptoms in females is not correlated with the X inactivation pattern studied in their blood. The mutation spectrum includes frameshift, missense and splice site variants and one single-exon deletion. All missense variants were predicted to affect CLCN4's function based on in silico tools and either segregated with the phenotype in the family or were de novo. Pathogenicity of all previously unreported missense variants was further supported by electrophysiological studies in Xenopus laevis oocytes. We compare CLCN4-related disorder with conditions related to dysfunction of other members of the CLC family.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 23 August 2016; doi:10.1038/mp.2016.135.

Ultrafast Magic-Angle Spinning: Benefits for the Acquisition of Ultrawide-Line NMR Spectra of Heavy Spin-1/2 Nuclei
Pöppler, A. C., Demers, J. P., Malon(*), M., Singh(*), A. P., Roesky(*), H. W., Nishiyama(*), Y.; Lange, A.
Chemphyschem, 17:812-816
(2016)

Tags: Molecular Biophysics (Lange, A.)

Abstract: The benefits of the ultrafast magic-angle spinning (MAS) approach for the acquisition of ultrawide-line NMR spectra-spectral simplification, increased mass sensitivity allowing the fast study of small amounts of material, efficient excitation, and application to multiple heavy nuclei-are demonstrated for tin(II) oxide (SnO) and the tin complex [(LB)Sn(II) Cl](+) [Sn(II) Cl3 ](-) [LB=2,6-diacetylpyridinebis(2,6-diisopropylanil)] containing two distinct tin environments. The ultrafast MAS experiments provide optimal conditions for the extraction of the chemical-shift anisotropy tensor parameters, anisotropy, and asymmetry for heavy spin-1/2 nuclei.

Page:  
Previous | 1, 2, 3, 4 | Next
Export as:
BibTeX, XML

Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (FMP)
Campus Berlin-Buch
Robert-Roessle-Str. 10
13125 Berlin, Germany
+4930 94793 - 100 
+4930 94793 - 109 (Fax)
info(at)fmp-berlin.de

Like many sites, we use cookies to optimize the user's browsing experience. Data Protection OK