FMP Publications

Our publications are recorded in a searchable database since 2010, updates will be added regularly.

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References

2010

Endosomal chloride-proton exchange rather than chloride conductance is crucial for renal endocytosis
Novarino, G., Weinert, S., Rickheit, G.; Jentsch, T. J.
Science, 328:1398-1401
(2010)

Tags: Physiology and Pathology of Ion Transport (Jentsch

Abstract: Loss of the endosomal anion transport protein ClC-5 impairs renal endocytosis and underlies human Dent's disease. ClC-5 is thought to promote endocytosis by facilitating endosomal acidification through the neutralization of proton pump currents. However, ClC-5 is a 2 chloride (Cl-)/proton (H+) exchanger rather than a Cl- channel. We generated mice that carry the uncoupling E211A (unc) mutation that converts ClC-5 into a pure Cl- conductor. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent acidification of renal endosomes was reduced in mice in which ClC-5 was knocked out, but normal in Clcn5(unc) mice. However, their proximal tubular endocytosis was also impaired. Thus, endosomal chloride concentration, which is raised by ClC-5 in exchange for protons accumulated by the H+-ATPase, may play a role in endocytosis.

Amyloid beta 42 peptide (Abeta42)-lowering compounds directly bind to Abeta and interfere with amyloid precursor protein (APP) transmembrane dimerization
Richter(*), L., Munter(*), L. M., Ness(*), J., Hildebrand(*), P. W., Dasari, M., Unterreitmeier(*), S., Bulic(*), B., Beyermann, M., Gust(*), R., Reif, B., Weggen(*), S., Langosch(*), D.; Multhaup(*), G.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A, 107:14597-14602
(2010)

Tags: Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy (Reif), Peptide Synthesis (Beyermann)

Abstract: Following ectodomain shedding by beta-secretase, successive proteolytic cleavages within the transmembrane sequence (TMS) of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) catalyzed by gamma-secretase result in the release of amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptides of variable length. Abeta peptides with 42 amino acids appear to be the key pathogenic species in Alzheimer's disease, as they are believed to initiate neuronal degeneration. Sulindac sulfide, which is known as a potent gamma-secretase modulator (GSM), selectively reduces Abeta42 production in favor of shorter Abeta species, such as Abeta38. By studying APP-TMS dimerization we previously showed that an attenuated interaction similarly decreased Abeta42 levels and concomitantly increased Abeta38 levels. However, the precise molecular mechanism by which GSMs modulate Abeta production is still unclear. In this study, using a reporter gene-based dimerization assay, we found that APP-TMS dimers are destabilized by sulindac sulfide and related Abeta42-lowering compounds in a concentration-dependent manner. By surface plasmon resonance analysis and NMR spectroscopy, we show that sulindac sulfide and novel sulindac-derived compounds directly bind to the Abeta sequence. Strikingly, the attenuated APP-TMS interaction by GSMs correlated strongly with Abeta42-lowering activity and binding strength to the Abeta sequence. Molecular docking analyses suggest that certain GSMs bind to the GxxxG dimerization motif in the APP-TMS. We conclude that these GSMs decrease Abeta42 levels by modulating APP-TMS interactions. This effect specifically emphasizes the importance of the dimeric APP-TMS as a promising drug target in Alzheimer's disease.

The KCNQ5 potassium channel mediates a component of the afterhyperpolarization current in mouse hippocampus
Tzingounis(*), A. V., Heidenreich, M., Kharkovets(*), T., Spitzmaul, G., Jensen(*), H. S., Nicoll(*), R. A.; Jentsch, T. J.
P Natl Acad Sci USA, 107:10232-10237
(2010)

Tags: Physiology and Pathology of Ion Transport (Jentsch

Abstract: Mutations in KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 voltage-gated potassium channels lead to neonatal epilepsy as a consequence of their key role in regulating neuronal excitability. Previous studies in the brain have focused primarily on these KCNQ family members, which contribute to M-currents and afterhyperpolarization conductances in multiple brain areas. In contrast, the function of KCNQ5 (Kv7.5), which also displays widespread expression in the brain, is entirely unknown. Here, we developed mice that carry a dominant negative mutation in the KCNQ5 pore to probe whether it has a similar function as other KCNQ channels. This mutation renders KCNQ5(dn)-containing homomeric and heteromeric channels nonfunctional. We find that Kcnq5(dn/dn) mice are viable and have normal brain morphology. Furthermore, expression and neuronal localization of KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 subunits are unchanged. However, in the CA3 area of hippocampus, a region that highly expresses KCNQ5 channels, the medium and slow afterhyperpolarization currents are significantly reduced. In contrast, neither current is affected in the CA1 area of the hippocampus, a region with low KCNQ5 expression. Our results demonstrate that KCNQ5 channels contribute to the afterhyperpolarization currents in hippocampus in a cell type-specific manner.

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Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (FMP)
Campus Berlin-Buch
Robert-Roessle-Str. 10
13125 Berlin, Germany
+4930 94793 - 100 
+4930 94793 - 109 (Fax)
info(at)fmp-berlin.de

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