FMP Publications

Our publications are recorded in a searchable database since 2010, updates will be added regularly.

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References

2016

X-exome sequencing of 405 unresolved families identifies seven novel intellectual disability genes
Hu(*), H., Haas(*), S. A., Chelly(*), J., Van Esch(*), H., Raynaud(*), M., de Brouwer(*), A. P., Weinert, S., Froyen(*), G., Frints(*), S. G., Laumonnier, F., Zemojtel(*), T., Love(*), M. I., Richard(*), H., Emde(*), A. K., Bienek(*), M., Jensen(*), C., Hambrock(*), M., Fischer(*), U., Langnick(*), C., Feldkamp(*), M., Wissink-Lindhout(*), W., Lebrun(*), N., Castelnau(*), L., Rucci(*), J., Montjean(*), R., Dorseuil(*), O., Billuart(*), P., Stuhlmann, T., Shaw(*), M., Corbett(*), M. A., Gardner(*), A., Willis-Owen(*), S., Tan(*), C., Friend(*), K. L., Belet(*), S., van Roozendaal(*), K. E., Jimenez-Pocquet(*), M., Moizard(*), M. P., Ronce(*), N., Sun(*), R., O'Keeffe(*), S., Chenna(*), R., van Bommel(*), A., Goke(*), J., Hackett(*), A., Field(*), M., Christie(*), L., Boyle(*), J., Haan(*), E., Nelson(*), J., Turner(*), G., Baynam(*), G., Gillessen-Kaesbach(*), G., Müller, U., Steinberger(*), D., Budny(*), B., Badura-Stronka(*), M., Latos-Bielenska(*), A., Ousager(*), L. B., Wieacker(*), P., Rodriguez Criado(*), G., Bondeson(*), M. L., Anneren(*), G., Dufke(*), A., Cohen(*), M., Van Maldergem(*), L., Vincent-Delorme(*), C., Echenne(*), B., Simon-Bouy(*), B., Kleefstra(*), T., Willemsen(*), M., Fryns(*), J. P., Devriendt(*), K., Ullmann(*), R., Vingron(*), M., Wrogemann(*), K., Wienker(*), T. F., Tzschach(*), A., van Bokhoven(*), H., Gecz(*), J., Jentsch, T. J., Chen(*), W., Ropers(*), H. H.; Kalscheuer(*), V. M.
Molecular psychiatry, 21:133-148
(2016)

Tags: Physiology and Pathology of Ion Transport (Jentsch

Abstract: X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder. During the past two decades in excess of 100 X-chromosome ID genes have been identified. Yet, a large number of families mapping to the X-chromosome remained unresolved suggesting that more XLID genes or loci are yet to be identified. Here, we have investigated 405 unresolved families with XLID. We employed massively parallel sequencing of all X-chromosome exons in the index males. The majority of these males were previously tested negative for copy number variations and for mutations in a subset of known XLID genes by Sanger sequencing. In total, 745 X-chromosomal genes were screened. After stringent filtering, a total of 1297 non-recurrent exonic variants remained for prioritization. Co-segregation analysis of potential clinically relevant changes revealed that 80 families (20%) carried pathogenic variants in established XLID genes. In 19 families, we detected likely causative protein truncating and missense variants in 7 novel and validated XLID genes (CLCN4, CNKSR2, FRMPD4, KLHL15, LAS1L, RLIM and USP27X) and potentially deleterious variants in 2 novel candidate XLID genes (CDK16 and TAF1). We show that the CLCN4 and CNKSR2 variants impair protein functions as indicated by electrophysiological studies and altered differentiation of cultured primary neurons from Clcn4(-/-) mice or after mRNA knock-down. The newly identified and candidate XLID proteins belong to pathways and networks with established roles in cognitive function and intellectual disability in particular. We suggest that systematic sequencing of all X-chromosomal genes in a cohort of patients with genetic evidence for X-chromosome locus involvement may resolve up to 58% of Fragile X-negative cases.

A phosphoinositide conversion mechanism for exit from endosomes
Ketel, K., Krauss, M., Nicot(*), A. S., Puchkov, D., Wieffer(*), M., Müller(*), R., Subramanian(*), D., Schultz(*), C., Laporte(*), J.; Haucke, V.
Nature, 529:408-412
(2016)

Tags: Molecular Pharmacology and Cell Biology (Haucke), Cellular Imaging (Wiesner/Puchkov)

Abstract: Phosphoinositides are a minor class of short-lived membrane phospholipids that serve crucial functions in cell physiology ranging from cell signalling and motility to their role as signposts of compartmental membrane identity. Phosphoinositide 4-phosphates such as phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI(4)P) and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) are concentrated at the plasma membrane, on secretory organelles, and on lysosomes, whereas phosphoinositide 3-phosphates, most notably phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI(3)P), are a hallmark of the endosomal system. Directional membrane traffic between endosomal and secretory compartments, although inherently complex, therefore requires regulated phosphoinositide conversion. The molecular mechanism underlying this conversion of phosphoinositide identity during cargo exit from endosomes by exocytosis is unknown. Here we report that surface delivery of endosomal cargo requires hydrolysis of PI(3)P by the phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphatase MTM1, an enzyme whose loss of function leads to X-linked centronuclear myopathy (also called myotubular myopathy) in humans. Removal of endosomal PI(3)P by MTM1 is accompanied by phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase-2alpha (PI4K2alpha)-dependent generation of PI(4)P and recruitment of the exocyst tethering complex to enable membrane fusion. Our data establish a mechanism for phosphoinositide conversion from PI(3)P to PI(4)P at endosomes en route to the plasma membrane and suggest that defective phosphoinositide conversion at endosomes underlies X-linked centronuclear myopathy caused by mutation of MTM1 in humans.

De novo and inherited mutations in the X-linked gene CLCN4 are associated with syndromic intellectual disability and behavior and seizure disorders in males and females
Palmer(*), E. E., Stuhlmann, T., Weinert, S., Haan(*), E., Van Esch(*), H., Holvoet(*), M., Boyle(*), J., Leffler(*), M., Raynaud(*), M., Moraine(*), C., van Bokhoven(*), H., Kleefstra(*), T., Kahrizi(*), K., Najmabadi(*), H., Ropers(*), H. H., Delgado(*), M. R., Sirsi(*), D., Golla(*), S., Sommer(*), A., Pietryga(*), M. P., Chung(*), W. K., Wynn(*), J., Rohena(*), L., Bernardo(*), E., Hamlin(*), D., Faux(*), B. M., Grange(*), D. K., Manwaring(*), L., Tolmie(*), J., Joss(*), S., Cobben(*), J. M., Duijkers(*), F. A., Goehringer(*), J. M., Challman(*), T. D., Hennig(*), F., Fischer(*), U., Grimme(*), A., Suckow(*), V., Musante(*), L., Nicholl(*), J., Shaw(*), M., Lodh(*), S. P., Niu(*), Z., Rosenfeld(*), J. A., Stankiewicz(*), P., Jentsch, T. J., Gecz(*), J., Field(*), M.; Kalscheuer(*), V. M.
Molecular psychiatry,
(2016)

Tags: Physiology and Pathology of Ion Transport (Jentsch)

Abstract: Variants in CLCN4, which encodes the chloride/hydrogen ion exchanger CIC-4 prominently expressed in brain, were recently described to cause X-linked intellectual disability and epilepsy. We present detailed phenotypic information on 52 individuals from 16 families with CLCN4-related disorder: 5 affected females and 2 affected males with a de novo variant in CLCN4 (6 individuals previously unreported) and 27 affected males, 3 affected females and 15 asymptomatic female carriers from 9 families with inherited CLCN4 variants (4 families previously unreported). Intellectual disability ranged from borderline to profound. Behavioral and psychiatric disorders were common in both child- and adulthood, and included autistic features, mood disorders, obsessive-compulsive behaviors and hetero- and autoaggression. Epilepsy was common, with severity ranging from epileptic encephalopathy to well-controlled seizures. Several affected individuals showed white matter changes on cerebral neuroimaging and progressive neurological symptoms, including movement disorders and spasticity. Heterozygous females can be as severely affected as males. The variability of symptoms in females is not correlated with the X inactivation pattern studied in their blood. The mutation spectrum includes frameshift, missense and splice site variants and one single-exon deletion. All missense variants were predicted to affect CLCN4's function based on in silico tools and either segregated with the phenotype in the family or were de novo. Pathogenicity of all previously unreported missense variants was further supported by electrophysiological studies in Xenopus laevis oocytes. We compare CLCN4-related disorder with conditions related to dysfunction of other members of the CLC family.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 23 August 2016; doi:10.1038/mp.2016.135.

Ultrafast Magic-Angle Spinning: Benefits for the Acquisition of Ultrawide-Line NMR Spectra of Heavy Spin-1/2 Nuclei
Pöppler, A. C., Demers, J. P., Malon(*), M., Singh(*), A. P., Roesky(*), H. W., Nishiyama(*), Y.; Lange, A.
Chemphyschem, 17:812-816
(2016)

Tags: Molecular Biophysics (Lange, A.)

Abstract: The benefits of the ultrafast magic-angle spinning (MAS) approach for the acquisition of ultrawide-line NMR spectra-spectral simplification, increased mass sensitivity allowing the fast study of small amounts of material, efficient excitation, and application to multiple heavy nuclei-are demonstrated for tin(II) oxide (SnO) and the tin complex [(LB)Sn(II) Cl](+) [Sn(II) Cl3 ](-) [LB=2,6-diacetylpyridinebis(2,6-diisopropylanil)] containing two distinct tin environments. The ultrafast MAS experiments provide optimal conditions for the extraction of the chemical-shift anisotropy tensor parameters, anisotropy, and asymmetry for heavy spin-1/2 nuclei.

A Non-canonical Voltage-Sensing Mechanism Controls Gating in K2P K(+) Channels
Schewe(*), M., Nematian-Ardestani(*), E., Sun, H., Musinszki(*), M., Cordeiro(*), S., Bucci(*), G., de Groot(*), B. L., Tucker(*), S. J., Rapedius(*), M.; Baukrowitz(*), T.
Cell, 164:937-949
(2016)

Tags: Computational Chemistry and Protein Design (Kühne)

Abstract: Two-pore domain (K2P) K(+) channels are major regulators of excitability that endow cells with an outwardly rectifying background "leak" conductance. In some K2P channels, strong voltage-dependent activation has been observed, but the mechanism remains unresolved because they lack a canonical voltage-sensing domain. Here, we show voltage-dependent gating is common to most K2P channels and that this voltage sensitivity originates from the movement of three to four ions into the high electric field of an inactive selectivity filter. Overall, this ion-flux gating mechanism generates a one-way "check valve" within the filter because outward movement of K(+) induces filter opening, whereas inward movement promotes inactivation. Furthermore, many physiological stimuli switch off this flux gating mode to convert K2P channels into a leak conductance. These findings provide insight into the functional plasticity of a K(+)-selective filter and also refine our understanding of K2P channels and the mechanisms by which ion channels can sense voltage.

Lysosomal Dysfunction Caused by Cellular Accumulation of Silica Nanoparticles
Schütz, I., Lopez-Hernandez, T., Gao(*), Q., Puchkov, D., Jabs, S., Nordmeyer(*), D., Schmudde(*), M., Rühl(*), E., Graf(*), C. M.; Haucke, V.
J Biol Chem, 291:14170-14184
(2016)

Tags: Molecular Pharmacology and Cell Biology (Haucke), Physiology and Pathology of Ion Transport (Jentsch), Cellular Imaging (Wiesner, Puchkov)

Abstract: Nanoparticles (NPs) are widely used as components of drugs or cosmetics and hold great promise for biomedicine, yet their effects on cell physiology remain poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that clathrin-independent dynamin 2-mediated caveolar uptake of surface-functionalized silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) impairs cell viability due to lysosomal dysfunction. We show that internalized SiNPs accumulate in lysosomes resulting in inhibition of autophagy-mediated protein turnover and impaired degradation of internalized epidermal growth factor, whereas endosomal recycling proceeds unperturbed. This phenotype is caused by perturbed delivery of cargo via autophagosomes and late endosomes to SiNP-filled cathepsin B/L-containing lysosomes rather than elevated lysosomal pH or altered mTOR activity. Given the importance of autophagy and lysosomal protein degradation for cellular proteostasis and clearance of aggregated proteins, these results raise the question of beneficial use of NPs in biomedicine and beyond.

The progressive ankylosis protein ANK facilitates clathrin- and adaptor-mediated membrane traffic at the trans-Golgi network-to-endosome interface
Seifert(*), W., Posor, Y., Schu(*), P., Stenbeck(*), G., Mundlos(*), S., Klaassen(*), S., Nürnberg(*), P., Haucke, V., Kornak(*), U.; Kühnisch(*), J.
Hum Mol Genet, 25:3836-3848
(2016)

Tags: Molecular Pharmacology and Cell Biology (Haucke)

Abstract: Dominant or recessive mutations in the progressive ankylosis gene ANKH have been linked to familial chondrocalcinosis (CCAL2), craniometaphyseal dysplasia (CMD), mental retardation, deafness and ankylosis syndrome (MRDA). The function of the encoded membrane protein ANK in cellular compartments other than the plasma membrane is unknown. Here, we show that ANK localizes to the trans-Golgi network (TGN), clathrin-coated vesicles and the plasma membrane. ANK functionally interacts with clathrin and clathrin associated adaptor protein (AP) complexes as loss of either protein causes ANK dispersion from the TGN to cytoplasmic endosome-like puncta. Consistent with its subcellular localization, loss of ANK results in reduced formation of tubular membrane carriers from the TGN, perinuclear accumulation of early endosomes and impaired transferrin endocytosis. Our data indicate that clathrin/AP-mediated cycling of ANK between the TGN, endosomes, and the cell surface regulates membrane traffic at the TGN/endosomal interface. These findings suggest that dysfunction of Golgi-endosomal membrane traffic may contribute to ANKH-associated pathologies.

2015

Design and Stereoselective Synthesis of ProM-2: A Spirocyclic Diproline Mimetic with Polyproline Type II (PPII) Helix Conformation
Reuter(*), C., Opitz, R., Soicke(*), A., Dohmen(*), S., Barone, M., Chiha(*), S., Klein(*), M. T., Neudörfl(*), J. M., Kühne, R.; Schmalz(*), H. G.
Chemistry, 21:8464-8470
(2015)

Tags: Computational Chemistry and Protein Design (Kühne)

Abstract: With the aim of developing polyproline type II helix (PPII) secondary-structure mimetics for the modulation of prolin-rich-mediated protein-protein interactions, the novel diproline mimetic ProM-2 was designed by bridging the two pyrrolidine rings of a diproline (Pro-Pro) unit through a Z-vinylidene moiety. This scaffold, which closely resembles a section of a PPII helix, was then stereoselectively synthesized by exploiting a ruthenium-catalyzed ring-closing metathesis (RCM) as a late key step. The required vinylproline building blocks, that is, (R)-N-Boc-2-vinylproline (Boc=tert-butyloxycarbonyl) and (S,S)-5-vinylproline-tert-butyl ester, were prepared on a gram scale as pure stereoisomers. The difficult peptide coupling of the sterically demanding building blocks was achieved in good yield and without epimerization by using 2-(1H-7-azabenzotriazol-1-yl)-1,1,3,3-tetramethyluronium hexafluorophosphate (HATU)/N,N-diisopropylethylamine (DIPEA). The RCM proceeded smoothly in the presence of the Grubbs II catalyst. Stereostructural assignments for several intermediates were secured by X-ray crystallography. As a proof of concept, it was shown that certain peptides containing ProM-2 exhibited improved (canonical) binding towards the Ena/VASP homology 1 (EVH1) domain as a relevant protein interaction target.

Sensitivity and resolution of proton detected spectra of a deuterated protein at 40 and 60 kHz magic-angle-spinning
Nieuwkoop, A. J., Franks, W. T., Rehbein, K., Diehl, A., Akbey, Ü., Engelke(*), F., Emsley(*), L., Pintacuda(*), G.; Oschkinat, H.
J Biomol NMR, 61:161-171
(2015)

Tags: NMR-Supported Structural Biology (Oschkinat)

Abstract: The use of small rotors capable of very fast magic-angle spinning (MAS) in conjunction with proton dilution by perdeuteration and partial reprotonation at exchangeable sites has enabled the acquisition of resolved, proton detected, solid-state NMR spectra on samples of biological macromolecules. The ability to detect the high-gamma protons, instead of carbons or nitrogens, increases sensitivity. In order to achieve sufficient resolution of the amide proton signals, rotors must be spun at the maximum rate possible given their size and the proton back-exchange percentage tuned. Here we investigate the optimal proton back-exchange ratio for triply labeled SH3 at 40 kHz MAS. We find that spectra acquired on 60 % back-exchanged samples in 1.9 mm rotors have similar resolution at 40 kHz MAS as spectra of 100 % back-exchanged samples in 1.3 mm rotors spinning at 60 kHz MAS, and for (H)NH 2D and (H)CNH 3D spectra, show 10-20 % higher sensitivity. For 100 % back-exchanged samples, the sensitivity in 1.9 mm rotors is superior by a factor of 1.9 in (H)NH and 1.8 in (H)CNH spectra but at lower resolution. For (H)C(C)NH experiments with a carbon-carbon mixing period, this sensitivity gain is lost due to shorter relaxation times and less efficient transfer steps. We present a detailed study on the sensitivity of these types of experiments for both types of rotors, which should enable experimentalists to make an informed decision about which type of rotor is best for specific applications.

Discovery of N-[4-(1H-Pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyrazin-6-yl)-phenyl]-sulfonamides as Highly Active and Selective SGK1 Inhibitors
Halland(*), N., Schmidt(*), F., Weiss(*), T., Saas(*), J., Li(*), Z., Czech(*), J., Dreyer(*), M., Hofmeister(*), A., Mertsch(*), K., Dietz(*), U., Strübing(*), C.; Nazare, M.
Acs Med Chem Lett, 6:73-78
(2015)

Tags: Medicinal Chemistry (Nazare)

Abstract: From a virtual screening starting point, inhibitors of the serum and glucocorticoid regulated kinase 1 were developed through a combination of classical medicinal chemistry and library approaches. This resulted in highly active small molecules with nanomolar activity and a good overall in vitro and ADME profile. Furthermore, the compounds exhibited unusually high kinase and off-target selectivity due to their rigid structure.

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Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (FMP)
Campus Berlin-Buch
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