FMP Publications

Our publications are recorded in a searchable database since 2010, updates will be added regularly.

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References
Structural Basis of the Oncogenic Interaction of Phosphatase PRL-1 with the Magnesium Transporter CNNM2
Gimenez-Mascarell(*), P., Oyenarte(*), I., Hardy(*), S., Breiderhoff(*), T., Stuiver, M., Kostantin(*), E., Diercks(*), T., Pey(*), A. L., Ereno-Orbea(*), J., Martinez-Chantar(*), M. L., Khalaf-Nazzal(*), R., Claverie-Martin(*), F., Müller(*), D., Tremblay(*), M. L.; Martinez-Cruz(*), L. A.
J Biol Chem, 292:786-801
(2017)

Tags: In-Cell NMR (Selenko)

Abstract: Phosphatases of regenerating liver (PRLs), the most oncogenic of all protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), play a critical role in metastatic progression of cancers. Recent findings established a new paradigm by uncovering that their association with magnesium transporters of the cyclin M (CNNM) family causes a rise in intracellular magnesium levels that promote oncogenic transformation. Recently, however, essential roles for regulation of the circadian rhythm and reproduction of the CNNM family have been highlighted. Here, we describe the crystal structure of PRL-1 in complex with the Bateman module of CNNM2 (CNNM2BAT), which consists of two cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS) domains (IPR000664) and represents an intracellular regulatory module of the transporter. The structure reveals a heterotetrameric association, consisting of a disc-like homodimer of CNNM2BAT bound to two independent PRL-1 molecules, each one located at opposite tips of the disc. The structure highlights the key role played by Asp-558 at the extended loop of the CBS2 motif of CNNM2 in maintaining the association between the two proteins and proves that the interaction between CNNM2 and PRL-1 occurs via the catalytic domain of the phosphatase. Our data shed new light on the structural basis underlying the interaction between PRL phosphatases and CNNM transporters and provides a hypothesis about the molecular mechanism by which PRL-1, upon binding to CNNM2, might increase the intracellular concentration of Mg2+ thereby contributing to tumor progression and metastasis. The availability of this structure sets the basis for the rational design of compounds modulating PRL-1 and CNNM2 activities.

Human iPSC-Derived Neural Progenitors Are an Effective Drug Discovery Model for Neurological mtDNA Disorders
Lorenz(*), C., Lesimple(*), P., Bukowiecki(*), R., Zink(*), A., Inak(*), G., Mlody(*), B., Singh(*), M., Semtner(*), M., Mah(*), N., Aure(*), K., Leong(*), M., Zabiegalov(*), O., Lyras(*), E. M., Pfiffer(*), V., Fauler(*), B., Eichhorst, J., Wiesner, B., Huebner(*), N., Priller(*), J., Mielke(*), T., Meierhofer(*), D., Izsvak(*), Z., Meier(*), J. C., Bouillaud(*), F., Adjaye(*), J., Schuelke(*), M., Wanker(*), E. E., Lombes(*), A.; Prigione(*), A.
Cell stem cell,
(2017)

Tags: Cellular Imaging (Wiesner)

Abstract: Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations frequently cause neurological diseases. Modeling of these defects has been difficult because of the challenges associated with engineering mtDNA. We show here that neural progenitor cells (NPCs) derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) retain the parental mtDNA profile and exhibit a metabolic switch toward oxidative phosphorylation. NPCs derived in this way from patients carrying a deleterious homoplasmic mutation in the mitochondrial gene MT-ATP6 (m.9185T>C) showed defective ATP production and abnormally high mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), plus altered calcium homeostasis, which represents a potential cause of neural impairment. High-content screening of FDA-approved drugs using the MMP phenotype highlighted avanafil, which we found was able to partially rescue the calcium defect in patient NPCs and differentiated neurons. Overall, our results show that iPSC-derived NPCs provide an effective model for drug screening to target mtDNA disorders that affect the nervous system.

An Integrative Framework Reveals Signaling-to-Transcription Events in Toll-like Receptor Signaling
Mertins(*), P., Przybylski(*), D., Yosef(*), N., Qiao(*), J., Clauser(*), K., Raychowdhury(*), R., Eisenhaure(*), T. M., Maritzen, T., Haucke, V., Satoh(*), T., Akira(*), S., Carr(*), S. A., Regev(*), A., Hacohen(*), N.; Chevrier(*), N.
Cell Rep, 19:2853-2866
(2017)

Tags: Molecular Pharmacology and Cell Biology (Haucke), Membrane Traffic and Cell Motility (Maritzen)

Abstract: Building an integrated view of cellular responses to environmental cues remains a fundamental challenge due to the complexity of intracellular networks in mammalian cells. Here, we introduce an integrative biochemical and genetic framework to dissect signal transduction events using multiple data types and, in particular, to unify signaling and transcriptional networks. Using the Toll-like receptor (TLR) system as a model cellular response, we generate multifaceted datasets on physical, enzymatic, and functional interactions and integrate these data to reveal biochemical paths that connect TLR4 signaling to transcription. We define the roles of proximal TLR4 kinases, identify and functionally test two dozen candidate regulators, and demonstrate a role for Ap1ar (encoding the Gadkin protein) and its binding partner, Picalm, potentially linking vesicle transport with pro-inflammatory responses. Our study thus demonstrates how deciphering dynamic cellular responses by integrating datasets on various regulatory layers defines key components and higher-order logic underlying signaling-to-transcription pathways.

Eighth International Chorea-Acanthocytosis Symposium: Summary of Workshop Discussion and Action Points
Pappas(*), S. S., Bonifacino(*), J., Danek(*), A., Dauer, W. T., De(*), M., De Franceschi(*), L., DiPaolo(*), G., Fuller(*), R., Haucke, V., Hermann(*), A., Kornmann(*), B., Landwehrmeyer(*), B., Levin(*), J., Neiman(*), A. M., Rudnicki(*), D. D., Sibon(*), O., Velayos-Baeza(*), A., Vonk(*), J. J., Walker(*), R. H., Weisman(*), L. S.; Albin(*), R. L.
Tremor and other hyperkinetic movements (New York, N.Y.), 7:428
(2017)

Tags: Molecular Pharmacology and Cell Biology (Haucke)

Abstract: Chorea-Acanthocytosis (ChAc) is a rare hereditary neurological disorder characterized by abnormal movements, red blood cell pathology, and progressive neurodegeneration. Little is understood of the pathogenesis of ChAc and related disorders (collectively Neuroacanthocytosis). The Eighth International Chorea-Acanthocytosis Symposium was held in May 2016 in Ann Arbor, MI, USA, and focused on molecular mechanisms driving ChAc pathophysiology. Accompanying the meeting, members of the neuroacanthocytosis research community and other invited scientists met in a workshop to discuss the current understanding and next steps needed to better understand ChAc pathogenesis. These discussions identified several broad and critical needs for advancing ChAc research and patient care, and led to the definition of 18 specific action points related to functional and molecular studies, animal models, and clinical research. These action points, described below, represent tractable research goals to pursue for the next several years.

Structural Biology outside the box-inside the cell
Plitzko(*), J. M., Schuler(*), B.; Selenko, P.
Curr Opin Struct Biol, 46:110-121
(2017)

Tags: In-Cell NMR (Selenko)

Abstract: Recent developments in cellular cryo-electron tomography, in-cell single-molecule Forster resonance energy transfer-spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance-spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance-spectroscopy delivered unprecedented insights into the inner workings of cells. Here, we review complementary aspects of these methods and provide an outlook toward joint applications in the future.

Mechanism of partial agonism in AMPA-type glutamate receptors
Salazar, H., Eibl, C., Chebli, M.; Plested, A.
Nat Commun, 8:14327
(2017)

Tags: Molecular Neuroscience and Biophysics (Plested)

Abstract: Neurotransmitters trigger synaptic currents by activating ligand-gated ion channel receptors. Whereas most neurotransmitters are efficacious agonists, molecules that activate receptors more weakly-partial agonists-also exist. Whether these partial agonists have weak activity because they stabilize less active forms, sustain active states for a lesser fraction of the time or both, remains an open question. Here we describe the crystal structure of an alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate receptor (AMPAR) ligand binding domain (LBD) tetramer in complex with the partial agonist 5-fluorowillardiine (FW). We validate this structure, and others of different geometry, using engineered intersubunit bridges. We establish an inverse relation between the efficacy of an agonist and its promiscuity to drive the LBD layer into different conformations. These results suggest that partial agonists of the AMPAR are weak activators of the receptor because they stabilize multiple non-conducting conformations, indicating that agonism is a function of both the space and time domains.

The complex co-translational processing of glycoprotein GP5 of type 1 porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus
Thaa(*), B., Kaufer(*), S., Neumann(*), S. A., Peibst(*), B., Nauwynck(*), H., Krause, E.; Veit(*), M.
Virus Res, 240:112-120
(2017)

Tags: Mass Spectrometry (Krause, E.)

Abstract: GP5 and M, the major membrane proteins of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), are the driving force for virus budding and a target for antibodies. We studied co-translational processing of GP5 from an European PRRSV-1 strain. Using mass spectrometry, we show that in virus particles of a Lelystad variant, the signal peptide of GP5 was absent due to cleavage between glycine-34 and asparagine-35. This cleavage site removes an epitope for a neutralizing monoclonal antibody, but leaves intact another epitope recognized by neutralizing pig sera. Upon ectopic expression of this GP5 in cells, signal peptide cleavage was however inefficient. Complete cleavage occurred when cysteine-24 was changed to proline or an unused glycosylation site involving asparagine-35 was mutated. Insertion of proline at position 24 also caused carbohydrate attachment to asparagine-35. Glycosylation sites introduced downstream of residue 35 were used, but did not inhibit signal peptide processing. Co-expression of the M protein rescued this processing defect in GP5, suggesting a novel function of M towards GP5. We speculate that a complex interplay of the co-translational modifications of GP5 affect the N-terminal structure of the mature proteins and hence its antigenicity.

Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate optical uncaging potentiates exocytosis
Walter(*), A. M., Müller(*), R., Tawfik(*), B., Wierda(*), K. D., Pinheiro(*), P. S., Nadler(*), A., McCarthy(*), A. W., Ziomkiewicz(*), I., Kruse(*), M., Reither(*), G., Rettig(*), J., Lehmann, M., Haucke, V., Hille(*), B., Schultz(*), C.; Sorensen(*), J. B.
Elife, 6
(2017)

Tags: Molecular Pharmacology and Cell Biology (Haucke)

Abstract: Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] is essential for exocytosis. Classical ways of manipulating PI(4,5)P2 levels are slower than metabolism, making it difficult to distinguish effects of PI(4,5)P2 from those of its metabolites. We developed a membrane-permeant, photoactivatable PI(4,5)P2, which is loaded into cells in an inactive form and activated by light, allowing sub-second increases in PI(4,5)P2 levels. By combining this compound with electrophysiological measurements in mouse adrenal chromaffin cells, we show that PI(4,5)P2 uncaging potentiates exocytosis and identify synaptotagmin-1 (the Ca2+ sensor for exocytosis) and Munc13-2 (a vesicle priming protein) as the relevant effector proteins. PI(4,5)P2 activation of exocytosis did not depend on the PI(4,5)P2-binding CAPS-proteins, suggesting that PI(4,5)P2 uncaging bypasses CAPS-function. Finally, PI(4,5)P2 uncaging triggered the rapid fusion of a subset of readily-releasable vesicles, revealing a rapid role of PI(4,5)P2 in fusion triggering. Thus, optical uncaging of signaling lipids can uncover their rapid effects on cellular processes and identify lipid effectors.

Small-molecule inhibition of STOML3 oligomerization reverses pathological mechanical hypersensitivity
Wetzel(*), C., Pifferi(*), S., Picci(*), C., Gök(*), C., Hoffmann(*), D., Bali(*), K. K., Lampe, A., Lapatsina(*), L., Fleischer(*), R., Smith(*), E. S., Begay(*), V., Moroni(*), M., Estebanez(*), L., Kühnemund(*), J., Walcher(*), J., Specker, E., Neuenschwander, M., von Kries, J. P., Haucke, V., Kuner(*), R., Poulet(*), J. F., Schmoranzer(*), J., Poole(*), K.; Lewin(*), G. R.
Nat Neurosci, 20:209-218
(2017)

Tags: Molecular Pharmacology and Cell Biology (Haucke), Screening Unit (von Kries)

Abstract: The skin is equipped with specialized mechanoreceptors that allow the perception of the slightest brush. Indeed, some mechanoreceptors can detect even nanometer-scale movements. Movement is transformed into electrical signals via the gating of mechanically activated ion channels at sensory endings in the skin. The sensitivity of Piezo mechanically gated ion channels is controlled by stomatin-like protein-3 (STOML3), which is required for normal mechanoreceptor function. Here we identify small-molecule inhibitors of STOML3 oligomerization that reversibly reduce the sensitivity of mechanically gated currents in sensory neurons and silence mechanoreceptors in vivo. STOML3 inhibitors in the skin also reversibly attenuate fine touch perception in normal mice. Under pathophysiological conditions following nerve injury or diabetic neuropathy, the slightest touch can produce pain, and here STOML3 inhibitors can reverse mechanical hypersensitivity. Thus, small molecules applied locally to the skin can be used to modulate touch and may represent peripherally available drugs to treat tactile-driven pain following neuropathy.

A Two-Component Adhesive: Tau Fibrils Arise from a Combination of a Well-Defined Motif and Conformationally Flexible Interactions
Xiang(*), S. Q., Kulminskaya(*), N., Habenstein(*), B., Biernat(*), J., Tepper(*), K., Paulat(*), M., Griesinger(*), C., Becker(*), S., Lange, A., Mandelkow(*), E.; Linser(*), R.
J. Am. Chem. Soc., 139:2639-2646
(2017)

Tags: Molecular Biophysics (Lange, A.)

Abstract: Fibrillar aggregates of A beta and Tau in the brain are the major hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. Most Tau fibers have a twisted appearance, but the twist can be variable and even absent. This ambiguity, which has also been associated with different phenotypes of tauopathies, has led to controversial assumptions about fibril constitution, and it is unclear to-date what the molecular causes of this polymorphism are. To tackle this question, we used solid-state NMR strategies providing assignments of non-seeded three-repeat-domain Tau(3RD) with an inherent heterogeneity. This is in contrast to the general approach to characterize the most homogeneous preparations by construct truncation or intricate seeding protocols. Here, carbon and nitrogen chemical-shift conservation between fibrils revealed invariable secondary-structure properties, however, with inter-monomer interactions variable among samples. Residues with variable amide shifts are localized mostly to N- and C-terminal regions within the rigid beta structure in the repeat region of Tau(3RD). By contrast, the hexapeptide motif in repeat R3, a crucial motif for fibril formation, shows strikingly low variability of all NMR parameters: Starting as a nucleation site for monomer monomer contacts, this six-residue sequence element also turns into a well-defined structural element upon fibril formation. Given the absence of external causes in vitro, the interplay of structurally differently conserved elements in this protein likely reflects an intrinsic property of Tau fibrils.

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Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (FMP)
Campus Berlin-Buch
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13125 Berlin, Germany
+4930 94793 - 100 
+4930 94793 - 109 (Fax)
info(at)fmp-berlin.de

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