FMP Publications

Our publications are recorded in a searchable database since 2010, updates will be added regularly.

Year:  
All :: 2011, ... , 2013, 2014, 2015, ... , 2017
Author:  
All :: (, A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W, X, Y, Z 
Preferences: 
References per page: Show keywords Show abstracts
References
Design of a General-Purpose European Compound Screening Library for EU-OPENSCREEN
Horvath(*), D., Lisurek, M., Rupp, B., Kühne, R., Specker, E., von Kries, J., Rognan(*), D., Andersson(*), C. D., Almqvist(*), F., Elofsson(*), M., Enqvist(*), P. A., Gustavsson(*), A. L., Remez(*), N., Mestres(*), J., Marcou(*), G., Varnek(*), A., Hibert(*), M., Quintana(*), J.; Frank, R.
Chemmedchem, 9:2309-2326
(2014)

Tags: Chemical Systems Biology (Frank), Screening Unit (von Kries), Computational Chemistry and Protein Design (Kühne)

Abstract: This work describes a collaborative effort to define and apply a protocol for the rational selection of a general-purpose screening library, to be used by the screening platforms affiliated with the EU-OPENSCREEN initiative. It is designed as a standard source of compounds for primary screening against novel biological targets, at the request of research partners. Given the general nature of the potential applications of this compound collection, the focus of the selection strategy lies on ensuring chemical stability, absence of reactive compounds, screening-compliant physicochemical properties, loose compliance to drug-likeness criteria (as drug design is a major, but not exclusive application), and maximal diversity/coverage of chemical space, aimed at providing hits for a wide spectrum of drugable targets. Finally, practical availability/cost issues cannot be avoided. The main goal of this publication is to inform potential future users of this library about its conception, sources, and characteristics. The outline of the selection procedure, notably of the filtering rules designed by a large committee of European medicinal chemists and chemoinformaticians, may be of general methodological interest for the screening/medicinal chemistry community. The selection task of 200K molecules out of a pre-filtered set of 1.4M candidates was shared by five independent European research groups, each picking a subset of 40K compounds according to their own in-house methodology and expertise. An in-depth analysis of chemical space coverage of the library serves not only to characterize the collection, but also to compare the various chemoinformatics-driven selection procedures of maximal diversity sets. Compound selections contributed by various participating groups were mapped onto general-purpose self-organizing maps (SOMs) built on the basis of marketed drugs and bioactive reference molecules. In this way, the occupancy of chemical space by the EU-OPENSCREEN library could be directly compared with distributions of known bioactives of various classes. This mapping highlights the relevance of the selection and shows how the consensus reached by merging the five different 40K selections contributes to achieve this relevance. The approach also allows one to readily identify subsets of target-or target-class-oriented compounds from the EU-OPENSCREEN library to suit the needs of the diverse range of potential users. The final EU-OPENSCREEN library, assembled by merging five independent selections of 40K compounds from various expert groups, represents an excellent example of a Europe-wide collaborative effort toward the common objective of building best-in-class European open screening platforms.

Site-Specific Copper-Catalyzed Oxidation of alpha-Synuclein: Tightening the Link between Metal Binding and Protein Oxidative Damage in Parkinson's Disease
Miotto(*), M. C., Rodriguez(*), E. E., Valiente-Gabioud(*), A. A., Torres-Monserrat(*), V., Binolfi, A., Quintanar(*), L., Zweckstetter(*), M., Griesinger(*), C.; Fernandez(*), C. O.
Inorg Chem, 53:4350-4358
(2014)

Tags: In-Cell NMR (Selenko)

Abstract: Amyloid aggregation of a-synuclein (AS) has been linked to the pathological effects associated with Parkinson's disease (PD). Cu-II binds specifically at the N-terminus of AS and triggers its aggregation. Site-specific Cu-I-catalyzed oxidation of AS has been proposed as a plausible mechanism for metal-enhanced AS amyloid formation. In this study, Cu-I binding to AS was probed by NMR spectroscopy, in combination with synthetic peptide models, site-directed mutagenesis, and C-terminal-truncated protein variants. Our results demonstrate that both Met residues in the motif (MDVFM5)-M-1 constitute key structural determinants for the high-affinity binding of Cu-I to the N-terminal region of AS. The replacement of one Met residue by Ile causes a dramatic decrease in the binding affinity for Cu-I, whereas the removal of both Met residues results in a complete lack of binding. Moreover, these Met residues can be oxidized rapidly after air exposure of the AS-Cu-I complex, whereas Met-116 and Met-127 in the C-terminal region remain unaffected. Met-1 displays higher susceptibility to oxidative damage compared to Met-5 because it is directly involved in both Cu-II and Cu-I coordination, resulting in closer exposure to the reactive oxygen species that may be generated by the redox cycling of copper. Our findings support a mechanism where the interaction of AS with copper ions leads to site-specific metal-catalyzed oxidation in the protein under physiologically relevant conditions. In light of recent biological findings, these results support a role for AS-copper interactions in neurodegeneration in PD.

Interferon-gamma safeguards blood-brain barrier during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis
Ni(*), C., Wang(*), C., Zhang(*), J., Qu(*), L., Liu(*), X., Lu(*), Y., Yang(*), W., Deng(*), J., Lorenz, D., Gao(*), P., Meng(*), Q., Yan(*), X., Blasig, I. E.; Qin(*), Z.
The American journal of pathology, 184:3308-3320
(2014)

Tags: Molecular Cell Physiology (Blasig, I.E.), Cellular Imaging (Wiesner)

Abstract: The function of blood-brain barrier is often disrupted during the progression of multiple sclerosis and its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). However, the molecular mechanism of blood-brain barrier modulation during neuroinflammation remains unclear. Herein, we show that the expression of interferon-gamma (IFNgamma) receptor on endothelial cells (ECs) protected mice from the brain inflammation during EAE. IFNgamma stabilized the integrity of the cerebral endothelium and prevented the infiltration of leukocytes into the brain. Further analysis revealed that IFNgamma increased the expression of tight junction proteins zonula occludens protein 1 and occludin, as well as membranous distribution of claudin-5, in brain ECs. Silencing claudin-5 abolished the IFNgamma-mediated improvement of EC integrity. Taken together, our results show that IFNgamma, a pleiotropic proinflammatory cytokine, stabilizes blood-brain barrier integrity and, therefore, prevents brain inflammation during EAE.

A presynaptic role for the cytomatrix protein GIT in synaptic vesicle recycling
Podufall, J., Tian(*), R., Knoche(*), E., Puchkov, D., Walter, A. M., Rosa(*), S., Quentin(*), C., Vukoja, A., Jung(*), N., Lampe, A., Wichmann(*), C., Böhme(*), M., Depne(*)r, H., Zhang(*), Y. Q., Schmoranzer, J., Sigrist(*), S. J.; Haucke, V.
Cell Rep, 7:1417-1425
(2014)

Tags: Molecular Pharmacology and Cell Biology (Haucke)

Abstract: Neurotransmission involves the exo-endocytic cycling of synaptic vesicles (SVs) within nerve terminals. Exocytosis is facilitated by a cytomatrix assembled at the active zone (AZ). The precise spatial and functional relationship between exocytic fusion of SVs at AZ membranes and endocytic SV retrieval is unknown. Here, we identify the scaffold G protein coupled receptor kinase 2 interacting (GIT) protein as a component of the AZ-associated cytomatrix and as a regulator of SV endocytosis. GIT1 and its D. melanogaster ortholog, dGIT, are shown to directly associate with the endocytic adaptor stonin 2/stoned B. In Drosophila dgit mutants, stoned B and synaptotagmin levels are reduced and stoned B is partially mislocalized. Moreover, dgit mutants show morphological and functional defects in SV recycling. These data establish a presynaptic role for GIT in SV recycling and suggest a connection between the AZ cytomatrix and the endocytic machinery.

Export as:
BibTeX, XML

Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (FMP)
Campus Berlin-Buch
Robert-Roessle-Str. 10
13125 Berlin, Germany
+4930 94793 - 100 
+4930 94793 - 109 (Fax)
info(at)fmp-berlin.de

Like many sites, we use cookies to optimize the user's browsing experience. Data Protection OK