FMP Publications

Our publications are recorded in a searchable database since 2010, updates will be added regularly.

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References
Inactivation and Anion Selectivity of Volume-regulated Anion Channels (VRACs) Depend on C-terminal Residues of the First Extracellular Loop
Ullrich, F., Reincke, S. M., Voss, F. K., Stauber, T.; Jentsch, T. J.
J Biol Chem, 291:17040-17048
(2016)

Tags: Physiology and Pathology of Ion Transport (Jentsch)

Abstract: Canonical volume-regulated anion channels (VRACs) are crucial for cell volume regulation and have many other important roles, including tumor drug resistance and release of neurotransmitters. Although VRAC-mediated swelling-activated chloride currents (ICl,vol) have been studied for decades, exploration of the structure-function relationship of VRAC has become possible only after the recent discovery that VRACs are formed by differently composed heteromers of LRRC8 proteins. Inactivation of ICl,vol at positive potentials, a typical hallmark of VRACs, strongly varies between native cell types. Exploiting the large differences in inactivation between different LRRC8 heteromers, we now used chimeras assembled from isoforms LRRC8C and LRRC8E to uncover a highly conserved extracellular region preceding the second LRRC8 transmembrane domain as a major determinant of ICl,vol inactivation. Point mutations identified two amino acids (Lys-98 and Asp-100 in LRRC8A and equivalent residues in LRRC8C and -E), which upon charge reversal strongly altered the kinetics and voltage dependence of inactivation. Importantly, charge reversal at the first position also reduced the iodide > chloride permeability of ICl,vol This change in selectivity was stronger when both the obligatory LRRC8A subunit and the other co-expressed isoform (LRR8C or -E) carried such mutations. Hence, the C-terminal part of the first extracellular loop not only determines VRAC inactivation but might also participate in forming its outer pore. Inactivation of VRACs may involve a closure of the extracellular mouth of the permeation pathway.

Surface Binding of TOTAPOL Assists Structural Investigations of Amyloid Fibrils by Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR Spectroscopy
Nagaraj, M., Franks, T. W., Saeidpour(*), S., Schubeis(*), T., Oschkinat, H., Ritter(*), C.; van Rossum, B. J.
Chembiochem, 17:1308-1311
(2016)

Tags: NMR-Supported Structural Biology (Oschkinat)

Abstract: Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR can enhance sensitivity but often comes at the price of a substantial loss of resolution. Two major factors affect spectral quality: low-temperature heterogeneous line broadening and paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) effects. Investigations by NMR spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and EPR revealed a new substantial affinity of TOTAPOL to amyloid surfaces, very similar to that shown by the fluorescent dye thioflavin-T (ThT). As a consequence, DNP spectra with remarkably good resolution and still reasonable enhancement could be obtained at very low TOTAPOL concentrations, typically 400 times lower than commonly employed. These spectra yielded several long-range constraints that were difficult to obtain without DNP. Our findings open up new strategies for structural studies with DNP NMR spectroscopy on amyloids that can bind the biradical with affinity similar to that shown towards ThT.

Chemical fragment arrays for rapid druggability assessment
Aretz(*), J., Kondoh(*), Y., Honda(*), K., Anumala, U. R., Nazare, M., Watanabe(*), N., Osada(*), H.; Rademacher(*), C.
Chem Commun (Camb), 52:9067-9070
(2016)

Tags: Medicinal Chemistry (Nazare)

Abstract: Incorporation of early druggability assessment in the drug discovery process provides a means to prioritize target proteins for high-throughput screening. We present chemical fragment arrays as a method that is capable of determining the druggability of a given target with low protein and compound consumption, enabling rapid decision making during early phases of drug discovery.

Intradomain Allosteric Network Modulates Calcium Affinity of the C-Type Lectin Receptor Langerin
Hanske(*), J., Aleksic(*), S., Ballaschk, M., Jurk(*), M., Shanina(*), E., Beerbaum, M., Schmieder, P., Keller(*), B. G.; Rademacher(*), C.
J Am Chem Soc, 138:12176-12186
(2016)

Tags: Solution NMR (Schmieder)

Abstract: Antigen uptake and processing by innate immune cells is crucial to initiate the immune response. Therein, the endocytic C-type lectin receptors serve as pattern recognition receptors, detecting pathogens by their glycan structures. Herein, we studied the carbohydrate recognition domain of Langerin, a C-type lectin receptor involved in the host defense against viruses such as HIV and influenza as well as bacteria and fungi. Using a combination of nuclear magnetic resonance and molecular dynamics simulations, we unraveled the molecular determinants underlying cargo capture and release encoded in the receptor architecture. Our findings revealed receptor dynamics over several time scales associated with binding and release of the essential cofactor Ca(2+) controlled by the coupled motions of two loops. Applying mutual information theory and site-directed mutagenesis, we identified an allosteric intradomain network that modulates the Ca(2+) affinity depending on the pH, thereby promoting fast ligand release.

Reversible Opening of Intercellular Junctions of Intestinal Epithelial and Brain Endothelial Cells With Tight Junction Modulator Peptides
Bocsik(*), A., Walter(*), F. R., Gyebrovszki(*), A., Fulop(*), L., Blasig, I., Dabrowski, S., Otvos(*), F., Toth(*), A., Rakhely(*), G., Veszelka(*), S., Vastag(*), M., Szabo-Revesz(*), P.; Deli(*), M. A.
Journal of pharmaceutical sciences, 105:754-765
(2016)

Tags: Molecular Cell Physiology (Blasig, I.E.)

Abstract: The intercellular junctions restrict the free passage of hydrophilic compounds through the paracellular clefts. Reversible opening of the tight junctions of biological barriers is investigated as one of the ways to increase drug delivery to the systemic circulation or the central nervous system. Six peptides, ADT-6, HAV-6, C-CPE, 7-mer (FDFWITP, PN-78), AT-1002, and PN-159, acting on different integral membrane and linker junctional proteins were tested on Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cell line and a coculture model of the blood-brain barrier. All peptides tested in nontoxic concentrations showed a reversible tight junctions modulating effect and were effective to open the paracellular pathway for the marker molecules fluorescein and albumin. The change in the structure of cell-cell junctions was verified by immunostaining for occludin, claudin-4,-5, ZO-1, beta-catenin, and E-cadherin. Expression levels of occludin and claudins were measured in both models. We could demonstrate a selectivity of C-CPE, ADT-6, and HAV-6 peptides for epithelial cells and 7-mer and AT-1002 peptides for brain endothelial cells. PN-159 was the most effective modulator of junctional permeability in both models possibly acting via claudin-1 and -5. Our results indicate that these peptides can be effectively and selectively used as potential pharmaceutical excipients to improve drug delivery across biological barriers.

C-type natriuretic peptide and natriuretic peptide receptor B signalling inhibits cardiac sympathetic neurotransmission and autonomic function
Buttgereit(*), J., Shanks(*), J., Li(*), D., Hao(*), G., Athwal(*), A., Langenickel(*), T. H., Wright(*), H., da Costa Goncalves, A. C., Monti(*), J., Plehm(*), R., Popova(*), E., Qadri(*), F., Lapidus(*), I., Ryan(*), B., Ozcelik(*), C., Paterson(*), D. J., Bader(*), M.; Herring(*), N.
Cardiovasc Res, 112:637-644
(2016)

Tags: Anchored Signaling (Klussmann)

Abstract: AIMS: B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP)-natriuretic peptide receptor A (NPR-A) receptor signalling inhibits cardiac sympathetic neurotransmission, although C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) is the predominant neuropeptide of the nervous system with expression in the heart and vasculature. We hypothesized that CNP acts similarly to BNP, and that transgenic rats (TGRs) with neuron-specific overexpression of a dominant negative NPR-B receptor would develop heightened sympathetic drive. METHODS AND RESULTS: Mean arterial pressure and heart rate (HR) were significantly (P < 0.05) elevated in freely moving TGRs (n = 9) compared with Sprague Dawley (SD) controls (n = 10). TGR had impaired left ventricular systolic function and spectral analysis of HR variability suggested a shift towards sympathoexcitation. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated co-staining of NPR-B with tyrosine hydroxylase in stellate ganglia neurons. In SD rats, CNP (250 nM, n = 8) significantly reduced the tachycardia during right stellate ganglion stimulation (1-7 Hz) in vitro whereas the response to bath-applied norepinephrine (NE, 1 muM, n = 6) remained intact. CNP (250 nM, n = 8) significantly reduced the release of 3H-NE in isolated atria and this was prevented by the NPR-B antagonist P19 (250 nM, n = 6). The neuronal Ca2+ current (n = 6) and intracellular Ca2+ transient (n = 9, using fura-2AM) were also reduced by CNP in isolated stellate neurons. Treatment of the TGR (n = 9) with the sympatholytic clonidine (125 microg/kg per day) significantly reduced mean arterial pressure and HR to levels observed in the SD (n = 9). CONCLUSION: C-type natriuretic peptide reduces cardiac sympathetic neurotransmission via a reduction in neuronal calcium signalling and NE release through the NPR-B receptor. Situations impairing CNP-NPR-B signalling lead to hypertension, tachycardia, and impaired left ventricular systolic function secondary to sympatho-excitation.

Identification of Novel Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cell (NFAT)-associated Proteins in T Cells
Gabriel(*), C. H., Gross(*), F., Karl(*), M., Stephanowitz, H., Hennig(*), A. F., Weber(*), M., Gryzik(*), S., Bachmann(*), I., Hecklau(*), K., Wienands(*), J., Schuchhardt(*), J., Herzel(*), H., Radbruch(*), A., Krause, E.; Baumgrass(*), R.
J Biol Chem, 291:24172-24187
(2016)

Tags: Mass Spectrometry (Krause, E.)

Abstract: Transcription factors of the nuclear factor of activated T cell (NFAT) family are essential for antigen-specific T cell activation and differentiation. Their cooperative DNA binding with other transcription factors, such as AP1 proteins (FOS, JUN, and JUNB), FOXP3, IRFs, and EGR1, dictates the gene regulatory action of NFATs. To identify as yet unknown interaction partners of NFAT, we purified biotin-tagged NFATc1/alphaA, NFATc1/betaC, and NFATc2/C protein complexes and analyzed their components by stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture-based mass spectrometry. We revealed more than 170 NFAT-associated proteins, half of which are involved in transcriptional regulation. Among them are many hitherto unknown interaction partners of NFATc1 and NFATc2 in T cells, such as Raptor, CHEK1, CREB1, RUNX1, SATB1, Ikaros, and Helios. The association of NFATc2 with several other transcription factors is DNA-dependent, indicating cooperative DNA binding. Moreover, our computational analysis discovered that binding motifs for RUNX and CREB1 are found preferentially in the direct vicinity of NFAT-binding motifs and in a distinct orientation to them. Furthermore, we provide evidence that mTOR and CHEK1 kinase activity influence NFAT's transcriptional potency. Finally, our dataset of NFAT-associated proteins provides a good basis to further study NFAT's diverse functions and how these are modulated due to the interplay of multiple interaction partners.

Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Enhanced MAS NMR Spectroscopy for Structural Analysis of HIV-1 Protein Assemblies
Gupta(*), R., Lu(*), M., Hou(*), G., Caporini(*), M. A., Rosay(*), M., Maas(*), W., Struppe(*), J., Suiter(*), C., Ahn(*), J., Byeon(*), I. J., Franks, W. T., Orwick-Rydmark, M., Bertarello(*), A., Oschkinat, H., Lesage(*), A., Pintacuda(*), G., Gronenborn(*), A. M.; Polenova(*), T.
J Phys Chem B, 120:329-339
(2016)

Tags: NMR-Supported Structural Biology (Oschkinat)

Abstract: Mature infectious HIV-1 virions contain conical capsids composed of CA protein, generated by the proteolytic cleavage cascade of the Gag polyprotein, termed maturation. The mechanism of capsid core formation through the maturation process remains poorly understood. We present DNP-enhanced MAS NMR studies of tubular assemblies of CA and Gag CA-SP1 maturation intermediate and report 20-64-fold sensitivity enhancements due to DNP at 14.1 T. These sensitivity enhancements enabled direct observation of spacer peptide 1 (SP1) resonances in CA-SP1 by dipolar-based correlation experiments, unequivocally indicating that the SP1 peptide is unstructured in assembled CA-SP1 at cryogenic temperatures, corroborating our earlier results. Furthermore, the dependence of DNP enhancements and spectral resolution on magnetic field strength (9.4-18.8 T) and temperature (109-180 K) was investigated. Our results suggest that DNP-based measurements could potentially provide residue-specific dynamics information by allowing for the extraction of the temperature dependence of the anisotropic tensorial or relaxation parameters. With DNP, we were able to detect multiple well-resolved isoleucine side-chain conformers; unique intermolecular correlations across two CA molecules; and functionally relevant conformationally disordered states such as the 14-residue SP1 peptide, none of which are visible at ambient temperatures. The detection of isolated conformers and intermolecular correlations can provide crucial constraints for structure determination of these assemblies. Overall, our results establish DNP-based MAS NMR spectroscopy as an excellent tool for the characterization of HIV-1 assemblies.

SORLA regulates calpain-dependent degradation of synapsin
Hartl(*), D., Nebrich(*), G., Klein(*), O., Stephanowitz, H., Krause, E.; Rohe(*), M.
Alzheimers Dement, 12:952-963
(2016)

Tags: Mass Spectrometry (Krause, E.)

Abstract: INTRODUCTION: Sorting-related receptor with A-type repeats (SORLA) is an intracellular sorting receptor in neurons and a major risk factor for Alzheimer disease. METHODS: Here, we performed global proteome analyses in the brain of SORLA-deficient mice followed by biochemical and histopathologic studies to identify novel neuronal pathways affected by receptor dysfunction. RESULTS: We demonstrate that the lack of SORLA results in accumulation of phosphorylated synapsins in cortex and hippocampus. We propose an underlying molecular mechanism by demonstrating that SORLA interacts with phosphorylated synapsins through 14-3-3 adaptor proteins to deliver synapsins to calpain-mediated proteolytic degradation. DISCUSSION: Our results suggest a novel function for SORLA which is in control of synapsin degradation, potentially impacting on synaptic vesicle endocytosis and/or exocytosis.

Stabilization of bacterially expressed erythropoietin by single site-specific introduction of short branched PEG chains at naturally occurring glycosylation sites
Hoffmann(*), E., Streichert, K., Nischan, N., Seitz(*), C., Brunner(*), T., Schwagerus, S., Hackenberger, C. P.; Rubini(*), M.
Mol Biosyst, 12:1750-1755
(2016)

Tags: Chemische Biologie II (Hackenberger)

Abstract: The covalent attachment of polyethylene glycol (PEG) to therapeutic proteins can improve their physicochemical properties. In this work we utilized the non-natural amino acid p-azidophenylalanine (pAzF) in combination with the chemoselective Staudinger-phosphite reaction to install branched PEG chains to recombinant unglycosylated erythropoietin (EPO) at each single naturally occurring glycosylation site. PEGylation with two short 750 or 2000 Da PEG units at positions 24, 38, or 83 significantly decreased unspecific aggregation and proteolytic degradation while biological activity in vitro was preserved or even increased in comparison to full-glycosylated EPO. This site-specific bioconjugation approach permits to analyse the impact of PEGylation at single positions. These results represent an important step towards the engineering of site-specifically modified EPO variants from bacterial expression with increased therapeutic efficacy.

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Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (FMP)
Campus Berlin-Buch
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13125 Berlin, Germany
+4930 94793 - 100 
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info(at)fmp-berlin.de

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