FMP Publications

Our publications are recorded in a searchable database since 2010, updates will be added regularly.

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References
A Multiplexed NMR-Reporter Approach to Measure Cellular Kinase and Phosphatase Activities in Real-Time
Thongwichian, R., Kosten, J., Benary(*), U., Rose, H. M., Stuiver, M., Theillet, F. X., Dose, A., Koch(*), B., Yokoyama(*), H., Schwarzer, D., Wolf(*), J.; Selenko, P.
J. Am. Chem. Soc., 137:6468-6471
(2015)

Tags: In-Cell NMR (Selenko), Protein Chemistry (Schwarzer)

Abstract: Cell signaling is governed by dynamic changes in kinase and phosphatase activities, which are difficult to assess with discontinuous readout methods. Here, we introduce an NMR-based reporter approach to directly identify active kinases and phosphatases in complex physiological environments such as cell lysates and to measure their individual activities in a semicontinuous fashion. Multiplexed NMR profiling of reporter phosphorylation states provides unique advantages for kinase inhibitor studies and reveals reversible modulations of cellular enzyme activities under different metabolic conditions.

Direct access to site-specifically phosphorylated-lysine peptides from a solid-support
Bertran-Vicente, J., Schümann, M., Schmieder, P., Krause, E.; Hackenberger, C. P. R.
Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry, 13:6839-6843
(2015)

Tags: Chemical Biology II (Hackenberger), Mass Spectrometry (Krause, E), Solution NMR (Schmieder)

Abstract: Phosphorylation is a key process for changing the activity and function of proteins. The impact of phospho-serine (pSer), -threonine (pThr) and -tyrosine (pTyr) is certainly understood for some proteins. Recently, peptides and proteins containing N-phosphorylated amino acids such as phosphoarginine (pArg), phosphohistidine (pHis) and phospholysine (pLys) have gained interest because of their different chemical properties and stability profiles. Due to its high intrinsic lability, pLys is the least studied within this latter group. In order to gain insight into the biological role of pLys, chemical and analytical tools, which are compatible with the labile P(vO)-N bond, are highly sought-after. We recently reported an in-solution synthetic approach to incorporate pLys residues in a site-specific manner into peptides by taking advantage of the chemoselectivity of the Staudinger-phosphite reaction. While the in-solution approach allows us to circumvent the critical TFA cleavage, it still requires several transformations and purification steps to finally deliver pLys peptides. Here we report the synthesis of site-specific pLys peptides directly from a solid support by using a base labile resin. This straightforward and highly efficient approach facilitates the synthesis of various site-specific pLys-containing peptides and lays the groundwork for future studies about this elusive protein modification.

SEPT9 negatively regulates ubiquitin-dependent downregulation of EGFR
Diesenberg, K., Beerbaum, M., Fink, U., Schmieder, P.; Krauss, M.
J Cell Sci, 128:397-407
(2015)

Tags: Molecular Pharmacology and Cell Biology (Haucke), Solution NMR (Schmieder)

Abstract: Septins constitute a family of GTP-binding proteins that are involved in a variety of biological processes. Several isoforms have been implicated in disease, but the molecular mechanisms underlying pathogenesis are poorly understood. Here, we show that depletion of SEPT9 decreases surface levels of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs) by enhancing receptor degradation. We identify a consensus motif within the SEPT9 N-terminal domain that supports its association with the adaptor protein CIN85 (also known as SH3KBP1). We further show CIN85-SEPT9 to be localized exclusively to the plasma membrane, where SEPT9 is recruited to EGF-engaged receptors in a CIN85-dependent manner. Finally, we demonstrate that SEPT9 negatively regulates EGFR degradation by preventing the association of the ubiquitin ligase Cbl with CIN85, resulting in reduced EGFR ubiquitylation. Taken together, these data provide a mechanistic explanation of how SEPT9, though acting exclusively at the plasma membrane, impairs the sorting of EGFRs into the degradative pathway.

Multicolor Caged dSTORM Resolves the Ultrastructure of Synaptic Vesicles in the Brain
Lehmann, M., Gottschalk, B., Puchkov, D., Schmieder, P., Schwagerus, S., Hackenberger, C. P., Haucke, V.; Schmoranzer, J.
Angew Chem Int Ed Engl, 54:13230-13235
(2015)

Tags: Molecular Pharmacology and Cell Biology (Haucke), Chemical Biology II (Hackenberger)

Abstract: The precision of single-molecule localization-based super-resolution microscopy, including dSTORM, critically depends on the number of detected photons per localization. Recently, reductive caging of fluorescent dyes followed by UV-induced recovery in oxidative buffer systems was used to increase the photon yield and thereby the localization precision in single-color dSTORM. By screening 39 dyes for their fluorescence caging and recovery kinetics, we identify novel dyes that are suitable for multicolor caged dSTORM. Using a dye pair suited for registration error-free multicolor dSTORM based on spectral demixing (SD), a multicolor localization precision below 15 nm was achieved. Caged SD-dSTORM can resolve the ultrastructure of single 40 nm synaptic vesicles in brain sections similar to images obtained by immuno-electron microscopy, yet with much improved label density in two independent channels.

A modular toolkit to inhibit proline-rich motif-mediated protein-protein interactions
Opitz, R., Müller, M., Reuter, C., Barone, M., Soicke(*), A., Roske(*), Y., Piotukh, K., Huy(*), P., Beerbaum, M., Wiesner, B., Beyermann, M., Schmieder, P., Freund(*), C., Volkmer, R., Oschkinat, H., Schmalz(*), H. G.; Kühne, R.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A, 112:5011-5016
(2015)

Tags: Computational Chemistry and Protein Design (Kühne), NMR-Supported Structural Biology (Oschkinat), Peptide Chemistry (Hackenberger/ Volkmer), Solution NMR (Schmieder), Peptide Chemistry (Beyermann), Cellular Imaging (Wiesner)

Abstract: Small-molecule competitors of protein-protein interactions are urgently needed for functional analysis of large-scale genomics and proteomics data. Particularly abundant, yet so far undruggable, targets include domains specialized in recognizing proline-rich segments, including Src-homology 3 (SH3), WW, GYF, and Drosophila enabled (Ena)/vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) homology 1 (EVH1) domains. Here, we present a modular strategy to obtain an extendable toolkit of chemical fragments (ProMs) designed to replace pairs of conserved prolines in recognition motifs. As proof-of-principle, we developed a small, selective, peptidomimetic inhibitor of Ena/VASP EVH1 domain interactions. Highly invasive MDA MB 231 breast-cancer cells treated with this ligand showed displacement of VASP from focal adhesions, as well as from the front of lamellipodia, and strongly reduced cell invasion. General applicability of our strategy is illustrated by the design of an ErbB4-derived ligand containing two ProM-1 fragments, targeting the yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1)-WW domain with a fivefold higher affinity.

Beta blockers prevent correlation of plasma ACE2 activity with echocardiographic parameters in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy
Wang(*), Y., Moreira Mda(*), C., Heringer-Walther(*), S., Schultheiss(*), H. P., Siems, W. E., Wessel(*), N.; Walther(*), T.
Journal of cardiovascular pharmacology, 65:8-12
(2015)

Tags: Biochemical Neurobiology (Siems)

Abstract: Plasma angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) 2 activity has been demonstrated to be an independent prognostic marker in Chagas' disease, equally potent as B-type natriuretic peptide. This study aimed to investigate the prognostic potency of circulating ACE2 activity in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Blood samples were withdrawn from patients with idiopathic DCM and healthy control subjects. The DCM patients were subdivided into 2 groups according to their New York Heart Association classification. The plasma ACE2 activity was measured by a fluorescence method. Plasma ACE2 activity was significantly increased in DCM patients, correlating with clinical severity. It was correlating with echocardiographic parameters in patients with DCM. Furthermore, plasma ACE2 activity had the potency to predict cardiac death and heart transplantation. However, compared with patients with Chagas' disease, the correlation and predictive value of ACE2 activity in patients with DCM was much less pronounced. Beta blocker treatment in patients with DCM was identified to prevent the association between circulating ACE2 activity and echocardiographic parameters. Although ACE2 activity in blood samples of patients with DCM without beta blockers is potent in correlating with the severity of disease and in predicting death and heart transplantation, its correlation and prediction potency are significantly diminished by beta blocker treatment.

Thermodynamics of protein destabilization in live cells
Danielsson(*), J., Mu(*), X., Lang(*), L., Wang(*), H., Binolfi, A., Theillet, F. X., Bekei, B., Logan(*), D. T., Selenko, P., Wennerstrom(*), H.; Oliveberg(*), M.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A, 112:12402-12407
(2015)

Tags: In-Cell NMR (Selenko)

Abstract: Although protein folding and stability have been well explored under simplified conditions in vitro, it is yet unclear how these basic self-organization events are modulated by the crowded interior of live cells. To find out, we use here in-cell NMR to follow at atomic resolution the thermal unfolding of a beta-barrel protein inside mammalian and bacterial cells. Challenging the view from in vitro crowding effects, we find that the cells destabilize the protein at 37 degrees C but with a conspicuous twist: While the melting temperature goes down the cold unfolding moves into the physiological regime, coupled to an augmented heat-capacity change. The effect seems induced by transient, sequence-specific, interactions with the cellular components, acting preferentially on the unfolded ensemble. This points to a model where the in vivo influence on protein behavior is case specific, determined by the individual protein's interplay with the functionally optimized "interaction landscape" of the cellular interior.

Copper binding to the N-terminally acetylated, naturally occurring form of alpha-synuclein induces local helical folding
Miotto(*), M. C., Valiente-Gabioud(*), A. A., Rossetti(*), G., Zweckstetter(*), M., Carloni(*), P., Selenko, P., Griesinger(*), C., Binolfi, A.; Fernandez(*), C. O.
J Am Chem Soc, 137:6444-6447
(2015)

Tags: In-Cell NMR (Selenko)

Abstract: Growing evidence supports a link between brain copper homeostasis, the formation of alpha-synuclein (AS)-copper complexes, and the development of Parkinson disease (PD). Recently it was demonstrated that the physiological form of AS is N-terminally acetylated (AcAS). Here we used NMR spectroscopy to structurally characterize the interaction between Cu(I) and AcAS. We found that the formation of an AcAS-Cu(I) complex at the N-terminal region stabilizes local conformations with alpha-helical secondary structure and restricted motility. Our work provides new evidence into the metallo-biology of PD and opens new lines of research as the formation of AcAS-Cu(I) complex might impact on AcAS membrane binding and aggregation.

Real-time NMR monitoring of biological activities in complex physiological environments
Smith(*), M. J., Marshall(*), C. B., Theillet, F. X., Binolfi, A., Selenko, P.; Ikura(*), M.
Curr Opin Struct Biol, 32:39-47
(2015)

Tags: In-Cell NMR (Selenko)

Abstract: Biological reactions occur in a highly organized spatiotemporal context and with kinetics that are modulated by multiple environmental factors. To integrate these variables in our experimental investigations of 'native' biological activities, we require quantitative tools for time-resolved in situ analyses in physiologically relevant settings. Here, we outline the use of high-resolution NMR spectroscopy to directly observe biological reactions in complex environments and in real-time. Specifically, we discuss how real-time NMR (RT-NMR) methods have delineated insights into metabolic processes, post-translational protein modifications, activities of cellular GTPases and their regulators, as well as of protein folding events.

Differences in Signal Activation by LH and hCG are Mediated by the LH/CG Receptor's Extracellular Hinge Region
Grzesik, P., Kreuchwig, A., Rutz, C., Furkert, J., Wiesner, B., Schülein, R., Kleinau(*), G., Gromoll(*), J.; Krause, G.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne), 6:140
(2015)

Tags: Structural Bioinformatics and Protein Design (Krause, G.), Protein Trafficking (Schülein), Cellular Imaging (Wiesner)

Abstract: The human lutropin (hLH)/choriogonadotropin (hCG) receptor (LHCGR) can be activated by binding two slightly different gonadotropic glycoprotein hormones, choriogonadotropin (CG) - secreted by the placenta, and lutropin (LH) - produced by the pituitary. They induce different signaling profiles at the LHCGR. This cannot be explained by binding to the receptor's leucine-rich-repeat domain (LRRD), as this binding is similar for the two hormones. We therefore speculate that there are previously unknown differences in the hormone/receptor interaction at the extracellular hinge region, which might help to understand functional differences between the two hormones. We have therefore performed a detailed study of the binding and action of LH and CG at the LHCGR hinge region. We focused on a primate-specific additional exon in the hinge region, which is located between LRRD and the serpentine domain. The segment of the hinge region encoded by exon10 was previously reported to be only relevant to hLH signaling, as the exon10-deletion receptor exhibits decreased hLH signaling, but unchanged hCG signaling. We designed an advanced homology model of the hormone/LHCGR complex, followed by experimental characterization of relevant fragments in the hinge region. In addition, we examined predictions of a helical exon10-encoded conformation by block-wise polyalanine (helix supporting) mutations. These helix preserving modifications showed no effect on hormone-induced signaling. However, introduction of a structure-disturbing double-proline mutant LHCGR-Q303P/E305P within the exon10-helix has, in contrast to exon10-deletion, no impact on hLH, but only on hCG signaling. This opposite effect on signaling by hLH and hCG can be explained by distinct sites of hormone interaction in the hinge region. In conclusion, our analysis provides details of the differences between hLH- and hCG-induced signaling that are mainly determined in the L2-beta loop of the hormones and in the hinge region of the receptor.

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Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (FMP)
Campus Berlin-Buch
Robert-Roessle-Str. 10
13125 Berlin, Germany
+4930 94793 - 100 
+4930 94793 - 109 (Fax)
info(at)fmp-berlin.de

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