FMP Publications

Our publications are recorded in a searchable database since 2010, updates will be added regularly.

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References
Cannabinoid Type 2 Receptors Mediate a Cell Type-Specific Plasticity in the Hippocampus
Stempel(*), A. V., Stumpf(*), A., Zhang(*), H. Y., Ozdogan(*), T., Pannasch(*), U., Theis(*), A. K., Otte(*), D. M., Wojtalla(*), A., Racz(*), I., Ponomarenko, A., Xi(*), Z. X., Zimmer(*), A.; Schmitz(*), D.
Neuron, 90:795-809
(2016)

Tags: Behavioral Neurodynamics (Korotkova/Ponomarenko)

Abstract: Endocannabinoids (eCBs) exert major control over neuronal activity by activating cannabinoid receptors (CBRs). The functionality of the eCB system is primarily ascribed to the well-documented retrograde activation of presynaptic CB1Rs. We find that action potential-driven eCB release leads to a long-lasting membrane potential hyperpolarization in hippocampal principal cells that is independent of CB1Rs. The hyperpolarization, which is specific to CA3 and CA2 pyramidal cells (PCs), depends on the activation of neuronal CB2Rs, as shown by a combined pharmacogenetic and immunohistochemical approach. Upon activation, they modulate the activity of the sodium-bicarbonate co-transporter, leading to a hyperpolarization of the neuron. CB2R activation occurred in a purely self-regulatory manner, robustly altered the input/output function of CA3 PCs, and modulated gamma oscillations in vivo. To conclude, we describe a cell type-specific plasticity mechanism in the hippocampus that provides evidence for the neuronal expression of CB2Rs and emphasizes their importance in basic neuronal transmission.

Semi-synthesis of a tag-free O-GlcNAcylated tau protein by sequential chemoselective ligation
Schwagerus, S., Reimann, O., Despres(*), C., Smet-Nocca(*), C.; Hackenberger, C. P.
J Pept Sci, 22:327-333
(2016)

Tags: Chemical Biology II (Hackenberger)

Abstract: In this paper, the first semi-synthesis of the Alzheimer-relevant tau protein carrying an O-GlcNAcylation is demonstrated by using sequential chemoselective ligation. The 52-amino acid C-terminus of tau was obtained by native chemical ligation between two synthetic peptide fragments, one carrying the O-GlcNAc moiety on Ser400, which has recently been demonstrated to inhibit tau phosphorylation and to hinder tau oligomerization, and the other equipped with a photocleavable biotin handle. After desulfurization to deliver a native alanine at the ligation junction, the N-terminal cysteine was unmasked, and the peptide was further used for expressed protein ligation to generate the full-length tau protein, which was purified by a photocleavable biotin tag. We thus provide a synthetic route to obtain a homogenous tag-free O-GlcNAcylated tau protein that can further help to elucidate the significance of posttranslational modification on the tau protein and pave the way for evaluating possible drug targets in Alzheimer's disease. Copyright (c) 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Dynamics of the Ligand Binding Domain Layer during AMPA Receptor Activation
Baranovic, J., Chebli, M., Salazar, H., Carbone, A. L., Faelber(*), K., Lau(*), A. Y., Daumke(*), O.; Plested, A. J.
Biophys J, 110:896-911
(2016)

Tags: Molecular Neuroscience and Biophysics (Plested)

Abstract: Ionotropic glutamate receptors are postsynaptic tetrameric ligand-gated channels whose activity mediates fast excitatory transmission. Glutamate binding to clamshell-shaped ligand binding domains (LBDs) triggers opening of the integral ion channel, but how the four LBDs orchestrate receptor activation is unknown. Here, we present a high-resolution x-ray crystal structure displaying two tetrameric LBD arrangements fully bound to glutamate. Using a series of engineered metal ion trapping mutants, we showed that the more compact of the two assemblies corresponds to an arrangement populated during activation of full-length receptors. State-dependent cross-linking of the mutants identified zinc bridges between the canonical active LBD dimers that formed when the tetramer was either fully or partially bound by glutamate. These bridges also stabilized the resting state, consistent with the recently published full-length apo structure. Our results provide insight into the activation mechanism of glutamate receptors and the complex conformational space that the LBD layer can sample.

A phosphoinositide conversion mechanism for exit from endosomes
Ketel, K., Krauss, M., Nicot(*), A. S., Puchkov, D., Wieffer(*), M., Müller(*), R., Subramanian(*), D., Schultz(*), C., Laporte(*), J.; Haucke, V.
Nature, 529:408-412
(2016)

Tags: Molecular Pharmacology and Cell Biology (Haucke), Cellular Imaging (Wiesner/Puchkov)

Abstract: Phosphoinositides are a minor class of short-lived membrane phospholipids that serve crucial functions in cell physiology ranging from cell signalling and motility to their role as signposts of compartmental membrane identity. Phosphoinositide 4-phosphates such as phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI(4)P) and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) are concentrated at the plasma membrane, on secretory organelles, and on lysosomes, whereas phosphoinositide 3-phosphates, most notably phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI(3)P), are a hallmark of the endosomal system. Directional membrane traffic between endosomal and secretory compartments, although inherently complex, therefore requires regulated phosphoinositide conversion. The molecular mechanism underlying this conversion of phosphoinositide identity during cargo exit from endosomes by exocytosis is unknown. Here we report that surface delivery of endosomal cargo requires hydrolysis of PI(3)P by the phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphatase MTM1, an enzyme whose loss of function leads to X-linked centronuclear myopathy (also called myotubular myopathy) in humans. Removal of endosomal PI(3)P by MTM1 is accompanied by phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase-2alpha (PI4K2alpha)-dependent generation of PI(4)P and recruitment of the exocyst tethering complex to enable membrane fusion. Our data establish a mechanism for phosphoinositide conversion from PI(3)P to PI(4)P at endosomes en route to the plasma membrane and suggest that defective phosphoinositide conversion at endosomes underlies X-linked centronuclear myopathy caused by mutation of MTM1 in humans.

TNF induced cleavage of HSP90 by cathepsin D potentiates apoptotic cell death
Fritsch(*), J., Fickers(*), R., Klawitter(*), J., Särchen(*), V., Zingler(*), P., Adam(*), D., Janssen(*), O., Krause, E.; Schütze(*), S.
Oncotarget, 7:75774-75789
(2016)

Tags: Mass Spectrometry (Krause, E.)

Abstract: During apoptosis induction by TNF, the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptosis pathways converge at the lysosomal-mitochondrial interface. Earlier studies showed that the lysosomal aspartic protease Cathepsin D (CtsD) cleaves Bid to tBid, resulting in the amplification of the initial apoptotic cascade via mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP).The goal of this study was to identify further targets for CtsD that might be involved in activation upon death receptor ligation. Using a proteomics screen, we identified the heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) to be cleaved by CtsD after stimulation of U937 or other cell lines with TNF, FasL and TRAIL. HSP90 cleavage corresponded to apoptosis sensitivity of the cell lines to the different stimuli. After mutation of the cleavage site, HSP90 partially prevented apoptosis induction in U937 and Jurkat cells. Overexpression of the cleavage fragments in U937 and Jurkat cells showed no effect on apoptosis, excluding a direct pro-apoptotic function of these fragments. Pharmacological inhibition of HSP90 with 17AAG boosted ligand mediated apoptosis by enhancing Bid cleavage and caspase-9 activation. Together, we demonstrated that HSP90 plays an anti-apoptotic role in death receptor signalling and that CtsD-mediated cleavage of HSP90 sensitizes cells for apoptosis. These findings identify HSP90 as a potential target for cancer therapy in combination with death ligands (e.g. TNF or TRAIL).

X-exome sequencing of 405 unresolved families identifies seven novel intellectual disability genes
Hu(*), H., Haas(*), S. A., Chelly(*), J., Van Esch(*), H., Raynaud(*), M., de Brouwer(*), A. P., Weinert, S., Froyen(*), G., Frints(*), S. G., Laumonnier, F., Zemojtel(*), T., Love(*), M. I., Richard(*), H., Emde(*), A. K., Bienek(*), M., Jensen(*), C., Hambrock(*), M., Fischer(*), U., Langnick(*), C., Feldkamp(*), M., Wissink-Lindhout(*), W., Lebrun(*), N., Castelnau(*), L., Rucci(*), J., Montjean(*), R., Dorseuil(*), O., Billuart(*), P., Stuhlmann, T., Shaw(*), M., Corbett(*), M. A., Gardner(*), A., Willis-Owen(*), S., Tan(*), C., Friend(*), K. L., Belet(*), S., van Roozendaal(*), K. E., Jimenez-Pocquet(*), M., Moizard(*), M. P., Ronce(*), N., Sun(*), R., O'Keeffe(*), S., Chenna(*), R., van Bommel(*), A., Goke(*), J., Hackett(*), A., Field(*), M., Christie(*), L., Boyle(*), J., Haan(*), E., Nelson(*), J., Turner(*), G., Baynam(*), G., Gillessen-Kaesbach(*), G., Müller, U., Steinberger(*), D., Budny(*), B., Badura-Stronka(*), M., Latos-Bielenska(*), A., Ousager(*), L. B., Wieacker(*), P., Rodriguez Criado(*), G., Bondeson(*), M. L., Anneren(*), G., Dufke(*), A., Cohen(*), M., Van Maldergem(*), L., Vincent-Delorme(*), C., Echenne(*), B., Simon-Bouy(*), B., Kleefstra(*), T., Willemsen(*), M., Fryns(*), J. P., Devriendt(*), K., Ullmann(*), R., Vingron(*), M., Wrogemann(*), K., Wienker(*), T. F., Tzschach(*), A., van Bokhoven(*), H., Gecz(*), J., Jentsch, T. J., Chen(*), W., Ropers(*), H. H.; Kalscheuer(*), V. M.
Molecular psychiatry, 21:133-148
(2016)

Tags: Physiology and Pathology of Ion Transport (Jentsch

Abstract: X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder. During the past two decades in excess of 100 X-chromosome ID genes have been identified. Yet, a large number of families mapping to the X-chromosome remained unresolved suggesting that more XLID genes or loci are yet to be identified. Here, we have investigated 405 unresolved families with XLID. We employed massively parallel sequencing of all X-chromosome exons in the index males. The majority of these males were previously tested negative for copy number variations and for mutations in a subset of known XLID genes by Sanger sequencing. In total, 745 X-chromosomal genes were screened. After stringent filtering, a total of 1297 non-recurrent exonic variants remained for prioritization. Co-segregation analysis of potential clinically relevant changes revealed that 80 families (20%) carried pathogenic variants in established XLID genes. In 19 families, we detected likely causative protein truncating and missense variants in 7 novel and validated XLID genes (CLCN4, CNKSR2, FRMPD4, KLHL15, LAS1L, RLIM and USP27X) and potentially deleterious variants in 2 novel candidate XLID genes (CDK16 and TAF1). We show that the CLCN4 and CNKSR2 variants impair protein functions as indicated by electrophysiological studies and altered differentiation of cultured primary neurons from Clcn4(-/-) mice or after mRNA knock-down. The newly identified and candidate XLID proteins belong to pathways and networks with established roles in cognitive function and intellectual disability in particular. We suggest that systematic sequencing of all X-chromosomal genes in a cohort of patients with genetic evidence for X-chromosome locus involvement may resolve up to 58% of Fragile X-negative cases.

De novo and inherited mutations in the X-linked gene CLCN4 are associated with syndromic intellectual disability and behavior and seizure disorders in males and females
Palmer(*), E. E., Stuhlmann, T., Weinert, S., Haan(*), E., Van Esch(*), H., Holvoet(*), M., Boyle(*), J., Leffler(*), M., Raynaud(*), M., Moraine(*), C., van Bokhoven(*), H., Kleefstra(*), T., Kahrizi(*), K., Najmabadi(*), H., Ropers(*), H. H., Delgado(*), M. R., Sirsi(*), D., Golla(*), S., Sommer(*), A., Pietryga(*), M. P., Chung(*), W. K., Wynn(*), J., Rohena(*), L., Bernardo(*), E., Hamlin(*), D., Faux(*), B. M., Grange(*), D. K., Manwaring(*), L., Tolmie(*), J., Joss(*), S., Cobben(*), J. M., Duijkers(*), F. A., Goehringer(*), J. M., Challman(*), T. D., Hennig(*), F., Fischer(*), U., Grimme(*), A., Suckow(*), V., Musante(*), L., Nicholl(*), J., Shaw(*), M., Lodh(*), S. P., Niu(*), Z., Rosenfeld(*), J. A., Stankiewicz(*), P., Jentsch, T. J., Gecz(*), J., Field(*), M.; Kalscheuer(*), V. M.
Molecular psychiatry,
(2016)

Tags: Physiology and Pathology of Ion Transport (Jentsch)

Abstract: Variants in CLCN4, which encodes the chloride/hydrogen ion exchanger CIC-4 prominently expressed in brain, were recently described to cause X-linked intellectual disability and epilepsy. We present detailed phenotypic information on 52 individuals from 16 families with CLCN4-related disorder: 5 affected females and 2 affected males with a de novo variant in CLCN4 (6 individuals previously unreported) and 27 affected males, 3 affected females and 15 asymptomatic female carriers from 9 families with inherited CLCN4 variants (4 families previously unreported). Intellectual disability ranged from borderline to profound. Behavioral and psychiatric disorders were common in both child- and adulthood, and included autistic features, mood disorders, obsessive-compulsive behaviors and hetero- and autoaggression. Epilepsy was common, with severity ranging from epileptic encephalopathy to well-controlled seizures. Several affected individuals showed white matter changes on cerebral neuroimaging and progressive neurological symptoms, including movement disorders and spasticity. Heterozygous females can be as severely affected as males. The variability of symptoms in females is not correlated with the X inactivation pattern studied in their blood. The mutation spectrum includes frameshift, missense and splice site variants and one single-exon deletion. All missense variants were predicted to affect CLCN4's function based on in silico tools and either segregated with the phenotype in the family or were de novo. Pathogenicity of all previously unreported missense variants was further supported by electrophysiological studies in Xenopus laevis oocytes. We compare CLCN4-related disorder with conditions related to dysfunction of other members of the CLC family.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 23 August 2016; doi:10.1038/mp.2016.135.

The progressive ankylosis protein ANK facilitates clathrin- and adaptor-mediated membrane traffic at the trans-Golgi network-to-endosome interface
Seifert(*), W., Posor, Y., Schu(*), P., Stenbeck(*), G., Mundlos(*), S., Klaassen(*), S., Nürnberg(*), P., Haucke, V., Kornak(*), U.; Kühnisch(*), J.
Hum Mol Genet, 25:3836-3848
(2016)

Tags: Molecular Pharmacology and Cell Biology (Haucke)

Abstract: Dominant or recessive mutations in the progressive ankylosis gene ANKH have been linked to familial chondrocalcinosis (CCAL2), craniometaphyseal dysplasia (CMD), mental retardation, deafness and ankylosis syndrome (MRDA). The function of the encoded membrane protein ANK in cellular compartments other than the plasma membrane is unknown. Here, we show that ANK localizes to the trans-Golgi network (TGN), clathrin-coated vesicles and the plasma membrane. ANK functionally interacts with clathrin and clathrin associated adaptor protein (AP) complexes as loss of either protein causes ANK dispersion from the TGN to cytoplasmic endosome-like puncta. Consistent with its subcellular localization, loss of ANK results in reduced formation of tubular membrane carriers from the TGN, perinuclear accumulation of early endosomes and impaired transferrin endocytosis. Our data indicate that clathrin/AP-mediated cycling of ANK between the TGN, endosomes, and the cell surface regulates membrane traffic at the TGN/endosomal interface. These findings suggest that dysfunction of Golgi-endosomal membrane traffic may contribute to ANKH-associated pathologies.

bcTol : a highly water-soluble biradical for efficient dynamic nuclear polarization of biomolecules
Jagtap(*), A. P., Geiger, M. A., Stöppler, D., Orwick-Rydmark, M., Oschkinat, H.; Sigurdsson(*), S. T.
Chem Commun (Camb), 52:7020-7023
(2016)

Tags: NMR-Supported Structural Biology (Oschkinat)

Abstract: Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is an efficient method to overcome the inherent low sensitivity of magic-angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR. We report a new polarizing agent (), designed for biological applications, that yielded an enhancement value of 244 in a microcrystalline SH3 domain sample at 110 K.

Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Provides New Insights into Chromophore Structure in Phytochrome Photoreceptors
Stöppler, D., Song(*), C., van Rossum, B. J., Geiger, M. A., Lang(*), C., Mroginski(*), M. A., Jagtap(*), A. P., Sigurdsson(*), S. T., Matysik(*), J., Hughes(*), J.; Oschkinat, H.
Angew Chem Int Ed Engl, 55:16017-16020
(2016)

Tags: NMR-Supported Structural Biology (Oschkinat)

Abstract: Phytochromes are red/far-red photochromic photoreceptors acting as master regulators of development in higher plants, thereby controlling transcription of about 20 % of their genes. Light-induced isomerization of the bilin chromophore leads to large rearrangements in protein structure, whereby the role of protonation dynamics and charge distribution is of particular interest. To help unravel the inherent mechanisms, we present two-dimensional dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) enhanced solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectra of the functional sensory module of the cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1. To this end, the pyrrole ring nitrogen signals were assigned unequivocally, enabling us to locate the positive charge of the phycocyanobilin (PCB) chromophore. To help analyze proton exchange pathways, the proximity of PCB ring nitrogen atoms and functionally relevant H2 O molecules was also determined. Our study demonstrates the value of DNP in biological solid-state MAS NMR spectroscopy.

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Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (FMP)
Campus Berlin-Buch
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13125 Berlin, Germany
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