FMP Publications

Our publications are recorded in a searchable database since 2010, updates will be added regularly.

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References
Thermodynamics of protein destabilization in live cells
Danielsson(*), J., Mu(*), X., Lang(*), L., Wang(*), H., Binolfi, A., Theillet, F. X., Bekei, B., Logan(*), D. T., Selenko, P., Wennerstrom(*), H.; Oliveberg(*), M.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A, 112:12402-12407
(2015)

Tags: In-Cell NMR (Selenko)

Abstract: Although protein folding and stability have been well explored under simplified conditions in vitro, it is yet unclear how these basic self-organization events are modulated by the crowded interior of live cells. To find out, we use here in-cell NMR to follow at atomic resolution the thermal unfolding of a beta-barrel protein inside mammalian and bacterial cells. Challenging the view from in vitro crowding effects, we find that the cells destabilize the protein at 37 degrees C but with a conspicuous twist: While the melting temperature goes down the cold unfolding moves into the physiological regime, coupled to an augmented heat-capacity change. The effect seems induced by transient, sequence-specific, interactions with the cellular components, acting preferentially on the unfolded ensemble. This points to a model where the in vivo influence on protein behavior is case specific, determined by the individual protein's interplay with the functionally optimized "interaction landscape" of the cellular interior.

Real-time NMR monitoring of biological activities in complex physiological environments
Smith(*), M. J., Marshall(*), C. B., Theillet, F. X., Binolfi, A., Selenko, P.; Ikura(*), M.
Curr Opin Struct Biol, 32:39-47
(2015)

Tags: In-Cell NMR (Selenko)

Abstract: Biological reactions occur in a highly organized spatiotemporal context and with kinetics that are modulated by multiple environmental factors. To integrate these variables in our experimental investigations of 'native' biological activities, we require quantitative tools for time-resolved in situ analyses in physiologically relevant settings. Here, we outline the use of high-resolution NMR spectroscopy to directly observe biological reactions in complex environments and in real-time. Specifically, we discuss how real-time NMR (RT-NMR) methods have delineated insights into metabolic processes, post-translational protein modifications, activities of cellular GTPases and their regulators, as well as of protein folding events.

A Multiplexed NMR-Reporter Approach to Measure Cellular Kinase and Phosphatase Activities in Real-Time
Thongwichian, R., Kosten, J., Benary(*), U., Rose, H. M., Stuiver, M., Theillet, F. X., Dose, A., Koch(*), B., Yokoyama(*), H., Schwarzer, D., Wolf(*), J.; Selenko, P.
J. Am. Chem. Soc., 137:6468-6471
(2015)

Tags: In-Cell NMR (Selenko), Protein Chemistry (Schwarzer)

Abstract: Cell signaling is governed by dynamic changes in kinase and phosphatase activities, which are difficult to assess with discontinuous readout methods. Here, we introduce an NMR-based reporter approach to directly identify active kinases and phosphatases in complex physiological environments such as cell lysates and to measure their individual activities in a semicontinuous fashion. Multiplexed NMR profiling of reporter phosphorylation states provides unique advantages for kinase inhibitor studies and reveals reversible modulations of cellular enzyme activities under different metabolic conditions.

Improved intracellular delivery of peptide- and lipid-nanoplexes by natural glycosides
Weng(*), A., Manunta(*), M. D., Thakur(*), M., Gilabert-Oriol(*), R., Tagalakis(), A. D., Eddaoudi(*), A., Munye(*), M. M., Vink(*), C. A., Wiesner, B., Eichhorst, J., Melzig(*), M. F.; Hart(*), S. L.
J Control Release, 206:75-90
(2015)

Tags: Cellular Imaging (Wiesner)

Abstract: Targeted nanocarriers undergo endocytosis upon binding to their membrane receptors and are transported into cellular compartments such as late endosomes and lysosomes. In gene delivery the genetic material has to escape from the cellular compartments into the cytosol. The process of endosomal escape is one of the most critical steps for successful gene delivery. For this reason synthetic lipids with fusogenic properties such as 2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE) are integrated into the nanocarriers. In this study we show that a natural, plant derived glycoside (SO1861) from Saponaria officinalis L. greatly improves the efficacy of lipid based as well as non-lipid based targeted nanoplexes consisting of a targeted K16 peptide with a nucleic acid binding domain and plasmid-DNA, minicircle-DNA or small interfering RNA (siRNA). By confocal live cell imaging and single cell analyses, we demonstrate that SO1861 augments the escape of the genetic cargo out of the intracellular compartments into the cytosol. Co-localisation experiments with fluorescence labelled dextran and transferrin indicate that SO1861 induces the release of the genetic cargo out of endosomes and lysosomes. However, the transduction efficacy of a lentivirus based gene delivery system was not augmented. In order to design receptor-targeted nanoplexes (LPD) with improved functional properties, SO1861 was integrated into the lipid matrix of the LPD. The SO1861 sensitized LPD (LPDS) were characterized by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. Compared to their LPD counterparts the LPDS-nanoplexes showed a greatly improved gene delivery. As shown by differential scanning calorimetry SO1861 can be easily integrated into the lipid bilayer of glycerophospholipid model membranes. This underlines the great potential of SO1861 as a new transfection multiplier for non-viral gene delivery systems.

Redox Regulation of Cell Contacts by Tricellulin and Occludin: Redox-Sensitive Cysteine Sites in Tricellulin Regulate Both Tri- and Bicellular Junctions in Tissue Barriers as Shown in Hypoxia and Ischemia
Cording, J., Günther, R., Vigolo(*), E., Tscheik, C., Winkler, L., Schlattner, I., Lorenz, D., Haseloff, R. F., Schmidt-Ott(*), K. M., Wolburg(*), H.; Blasig, I. E.
Antioxid Redox Signal, 23:1035-1049
(2015)

Tags: Molecular Cell Physiology (Blasig, I.E.)

Abstract: UNLABELLED: Tight junctions (TJs) seal paracellular clefts in epithelia/endothelia and form tissue barriers for proper organ function. TJ-associated marvel proteins (TAMPs; tricellulin, occludin, marvelD3) are thought to be relevant to regulation. Under normal conditions, tricellulin tightens tricellular junctions against macromolecules. Traces of tricellulin occur in bicellular junctions. AIMS: As pathological disturbances have not been analyzed, the structure and function of human tricellulin, including potentially redox-sensitive Cys sites, were investigated under reducing/oxidizing conditions at 3- and 2-cell contacts. RESULTS: Ischemia, hypoxia, and reductants redistributed tricellulin from 3- to 2-cell contacts. The extracellular loop 2 (ECL2; conserved Cys321, Cys335) trans-oligomerized between three opposing cells. Substitutions of these residues caused bicellular localization. Cys362 in transmembrane domain 4 contributed to bicellular heterophilic cis-interactions along the cell membrane with claudin-1 and marvelD3, while Cys395 in the cytosolic C-terminal tail promoted homophilic tricellullar cis-interactions. The Cys sites included in homo-/heterophilic bi-/tricellular cis-/trans-interactions contributed to cell barrier tightness for small/large molecules. INNOVATION: Tricellulin forms TJs via trans- and cis-association in 3-cell contacts, as demonstrated electron and quantified fluorescence microscopically; it tightens 3- and 2-cell contacts. Tricellulin's ECL2 specifically seals 3-cell contacts redox dependently; a structural model is proposed. CONCLUSIONS: TAMP ECL2 and claudins' ECL1 share functionally and structurally similar features involved in homo-/heterophilic tightening of cell-cell contacts. Tricellulin is a specific redox sensor and sealing element at 3-cell contacts and may compensate as a redox mediator for occludin loss at 2-cell contacts in vivo and in vitro. Molecular interaction mechanisms were proposed that contribute to tricellulin's function. In conclusion, tricellulin is a junctional redox regulator for ischemia-related alterations.

Multifunctional reagents for quantitative proteome-wide analysis of protein modification in human cells and dynamic profiling of protein lipidation during vertebrate development
Broncel(*), M., Serwa(*), R. A., Ciepla(*), P., Krause, E., Dallman(*), M. J., Magee(*), A. I.; Tate(*), E. W.
Angew Chem Int Ed Engl, 54:5948-5951
(2015)

Tags: Mass Spectrometry (Krause, E.)

Abstract: Novel multifunctional reagents were applied in combination with a lipid probe for affinity enrichment of myristoylated proteins and direct detection of lipid-modified tryptic peptides by mass spectrometry. This method enables high-confidence identification of the myristoylated proteome on an unprecedented scale in cell culture, and allowed the first quantitative analysis of dynamic changes in protein lipidation during vertebrate embryonic development.

Myristoylation profiling in human cells and zebrafish
Broncel(*), M., Serwa(*), R. A., Ciepla(*), P., Krause, E., Dallman(*), M. J., Magee(*), A. I.; Tate(*), E. W.
Data Brief, 4:379-383
(2015)

Tags: Mass Spectrometry (Krause, E.)

Abstract: Human cells (HEK 293, HeLa, MCF-7) and zebrafish embryos were metabolically tagged with an alkynyl myristic acid probe, lysed with an SDS buffer and tagged proteomes ligated to multifunctional capture reagents via copper-catalyzed alkyne azide cycloaddition (CuAAC). This allowed for affinity enrichment and high-confidence identification, by delivering direct MS/MS evidence for the modification site, of 87 and 61 co-translationally myristoylated proteins in human cells and zebrafish, respectively. The data have been deposited to ProteomeXchange Consortium (Vizcaino et al., 2014 Nat. Biotechnol., 32, 223-6) (PXD001863 and PXD001876) and are described in detail in Multifunctional reagents for quantitative proteome-wide analysis of protein modification in human cells and dynamic protein lipidation during vertebrate development by Broncel et al., Angew. Chem. Int. Ed.

Systems Analysis of Protein Fatty Acylation in Herpes Simplex Virus-Infected Cells Using Chemical Proteomics
Serwa(*), R. A., Abaitua(*), F., Krause, E., Tate(*), E. W.; O'Hare(*), P.
Chem Biol, 22:1008-1017
(2015)

Tags: Mass Spectrometry (Krause, E.)

Abstract: Protein fatty acylation regulates diverse aspects of cellular function and organization and plays a key role in host immune responses to infection. Acylation also modulates the function and localization of virus-encoded proteins. Here, we employ chemical proteomics tools, bio-orthogonal probes, and capture reagents to study myristoylation and palmitoylation during infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV). Using in-gel fluorescence imaging and quantitative mass spectrometry, we demonstrate a generalized reduction in myristoylation of host proteins, whereas palmitoylation of host proteins, including regulators of interferon and tetraspanin family proteins, was selectively repressed. Furthermore, we found that a significant fraction of the viral proteome undergoes palmitoylation; we identified a number of virus membrane glycoproteins, structural proteins, and kinases. Taken together, our results provide broad oversight of protein acylation during HSV infection, a roadmap for similar analysis in other systems, and a resource with which to pursue specific analysis of systems and functions.

Light-Dark Adaptation of Channelrhodopsin Involves Photoconversion between the all-trans and 13-cis Retinal Isomers
Bruun(*), S., Stöppler, D., Keidel(*), A., Kuhlmann(*), U., Luck(*), M., Diehl, A., Geiger, M. A., Woodmansee(*), D., Trauner(*), D., Hegemann(*), P., Oschkinat, H., Hildebrandt(*), P.; Stehfes(*)t, K.
Biochemistry, 54:5389-5400
(2015)

Tags: NMR-Supported Structural Biology (Oschkinat)

Abstract: Channelrhodopsins (ChR) are light-gated ion channels of green algae that are widely used to probe the function of neuronal cells with light. Most ChRs show a substantial reduction in photocurrents during illumination, a process named "light adaptation". The main objective of this spectroscopic study was to elucidate the molecular processes associated with light-dark adaptation. Here we show by liquid and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy that the retinal chromophore of fully dark-adapted ChR is exclusively in an all-trans configuration. Resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy, however, revealed that already low light intensities establish a photostationary equilibrium between all-trans,15-anti and 13-cis,15-syn configurations at a ratio of 3:1. The underlying photoreactions involve simultaneous isomerization of the C(13) horizontal lineC(14) and C(15) horizontal lineN bonds. Both isomers of this DAapp state may run through photoinduced reaction cycles initiated by photoisomerization of only the C(13) horizontal lineC(14) bond. RR spectroscopic experiments further demonstrated that photoinduced conversion of the apparent dark-adapted (DAapp) state to the photocycle intermediates P500 and P390 is distinctly more efficient for the all-trans isomer than for the 13-cis isomer, possibly because of different chromophore-water interactions. Our data demonstrating two complementary photocycles of the DAapp isomers are fully consistent with the existence of two conducting states that vary in quantitative relation during light-dark adaptation, as suggested previously by electrical measurements.

Stonin1 mediates endocytosis of the proteoglycan NG2 and regulates focal adhesion dynamics and cell motility
Feutlinske, F., Browarski, M., Ku(*), M. C., Trnka, P., Waiczies(*), S., Niendorf(*), T., Stallcup(*), W. B., Glass(*), R., Krause, E.; Maritzen, T.
Nat Commun, 6:8535
(2015)

Tags: Membrane Traffic and Cell Motility (Maritzen), Mass Spectrometry (Krause, E.)

Abstract: Cellular functions, ranging from focal adhesion (FA) dynamics and cell motility to tumour growth, are orchestrated by signals cells receive from outside via cell surface receptors. Signalling is fine-tuned by the exo-endocytic cycling of these receptors to control cellular responses such as FA dynamics, which determine cell motility. How precisely endocytosis regulates turnover of the various cell surface receptors remains unclear. Here we identify Stonin1, an endocytic adaptor of unknown function, as a regulator of FA dynamics and cell motility, and demonstrate that it facilitates the internalization of the oncogenic proteoglycan NG2, a co-receptor of integrins and platelet-derived growth factor receptor. Embryonic fibroblasts obtained from Stonin1-deficient mice display a marked surface accumulation of NG2, increased cellular signalling and defective FA disassembly as well as altered cellular motility. These data establish Stonin1 as a specific adaptor for the endocytosis of NG2 and as an important factor for FA dynamics and cell migration.

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Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (FMP)
Campus Berlin-Buch
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13125 Berlin, Germany
+4930 94793 - 100 
+4930 94793 - 109 (Fax)
info(at)fmp-berlin.de

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