FMP Publications

Our publications are recorded in a searchable database since 2010, updates will be added regularly.

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References
Stonin1 mediates endocytosis of the proteoglycan NG2 and regulates focal adhesion dynamics and cell motility
Feutlinske, F., Browarski, M., Ku(*), M. C., Trnka, P., Waiczies(*), S., Niendorf(*), T., Stallcup(*), W. B., Glass(*), R., Krause, E.; Maritzen, T.
Nat Commun, 6:8535
(2015)

Tags: Membrane Traffic and Cell Motility (Maritzen), Mass Spectrometry (Krause, E.)

Abstract: Cellular functions, ranging from focal adhesion (FA) dynamics and cell motility to tumour growth, are orchestrated by signals cells receive from outside via cell surface receptors. Signalling is fine-tuned by the exo-endocytic cycling of these receptors to control cellular responses such as FA dynamics, which determine cell motility. How precisely endocytosis regulates turnover of the various cell surface receptors remains unclear. Here we identify Stonin1, an endocytic adaptor of unknown function, as a regulator of FA dynamics and cell motility, and demonstrate that it facilitates the internalization of the oncogenic proteoglycan NG2, a co-receptor of integrins and platelet-derived growth factor receptor. Embryonic fibroblasts obtained from Stonin1-deficient mice display a marked surface accumulation of NG2, increased cellular signalling and defective FA disassembly as well as altered cellular motility. These data establish Stonin1 as a specific adaptor for the endocytosis of NG2 and as an important factor for FA dynamics and cell migration.

KCNQ5 K(+) channels control hippocampal synaptic inhibition and fast network oscillations
Fidzinski, P., Korotkova, T., Heidenreich, M., Maier(*), N., Schütze, S., Kobler(*), O., Zuschratter(*), W., Schmitz(*), D., Ponomarenko, A.; Jentsch, T. J.
Nat Commun, 6:6254
(2015)

Tags: Physiology and Pathology of Ion Transport (Jentsch), Behavioral Neurodynamics (Korotkova/Ponomarenko)

Abstract: KCNQ2 (Kv7.2) and KCNQ3 (Kv7.3) K(+) channels dampen neuronal excitability and their functional impairment may lead to epilepsy. Less is known about KCNQ5 (Kv7.5), which also displays wide expression in the brain. Here we show an unexpected role of KCNQ5 in dampening synaptic inhibition and shaping network synchronization in the hippocampus. KCNQ5 localizes to the postsynaptic site of inhibitory synapses on pyramidal cells and in interneurons. Kcnq5(dn/dn) mice lacking functional KCNQ5 channels display increased excitability of different classes of interneurons, enhanced phasic and tonic inhibition, and decreased electrical shunting of inhibitory postsynaptic currents. In vivo, loss of KCNQ5 function leads to reduced fast (gamma and ripple) hippocampal oscillations, altered gamma-rhythmic discharge of pyramidal cells and impaired spatial representations. Our work demonstrates that KCNQ5 controls excitability and function of hippocampal networks through modulation of synaptic inhibition.

The efficacy of trivalent cyclic hexapeptides to induce lipid clustering in PG/PE membranes correlates with their antimicrobial activity
Finger(*), S., Kerth(*), A., Dathe, M.; Blume(*), A.
Biochim Biophys Acta, 1848:2998-3006
(2015)

Tags: Peptide-Lipid-Interaction/ Peptide Transport (Dathe)

Abstract: Various models have been proposed for the sequence of events occurring after binding of specific antimicrobial peptides to lipid membranes. The lipid clustering model arose by the finding that antimicrobial peptides can induce a segregation of certain negatively charged lipids in lipid model membranes. Anionic lipid segregation by cationic peptides is initially an effect of charge interaction where the ratio of peptide and lipid charges is thought to be the decisive parameter in the peptide induced lipid demixing. However, the sequence of events following this initial lipid clustering is more complex and can lead to deactivation of membrane proteins involved in cell division or perturbation of lipid reorganization essential for cell division. In this study we used DSC and ITC techniques to investigate the effect of binding different cyclic hexapeptides with varying antimicrobial efficacy, to phosphatidylglycerol (PG)/phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) lipid membranes and their ability to induce lipid segregation in these mixtures. We found that these cyclic hexapeptides consisting of three charged and three aromatic amino acids showed indeed different abilities to induce lipid demixing depending on their amino acid composition and their sequence. The results clearly showed that the cationic amino acids are essential for electrostatic binding but that the three hydrophobic amino acids in the peptides and their position in the sequence also contribute to binding affinity and to the extent of induction of lipid clustering. The efficacy of these different hexapeptides to induce PG clusters in PG/PE membranes was found to be correlated with their antimicrobial activity.

Modulation of monocarboxylate transporter 8 oligomerization by specific pathogenic mutations
Fischer(*), J., Kleinau(*), G., Müller(*), A., Kühnen(*), P., Zwanziger(*), D., Kinne, A., Rehders(*), M., Moeller(*), L. C., Führer(*), D., Grüters(*), A., Krude(*), H., Brix(*), K.; Biebermann(*), H.
Journal of molecular endocrinology, 54:39-50
(2015)

Tags: Structural Bioinformatics and Protein Design (Krause, G.)

Abstract: The monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) is a member of the major facilitator superfamily (MFS). These membrane-spanning proteins facilitate translocation of a variety of substrates, MCT8 specifically transports iodothyronines. Mutations in MCT8 are the underlying cause of severe X-linked psychomotor retardation. At the molecular level, such mutations led to deficiencies in substrate translocation due to reduced cell-surface expression, impaired substrate binding, or decreased substrate translocation capabilities. However, the causal relationships between genotypes, molecular features of mutated MCT8, and patient characteristics have not yet been comprehensively deciphered. We investigated the relationship between pathogenic mutants of MCT8 and their capacity to form dimers (presumably oligomeric structures) as a potential regulatory parameter of the transport function of MCT8. Fourteen pathogenic variants of MCT8 were investigated in vitro with respect to their capacity to form oligomers. Particular mutations close to the substrate translocation channel (S194F, A224T, L434W, and R445C) were found to inhibit dimerization of MCT8. This finding is in contrast to those for other transporters or transmembrane proteins, in which substitutions predominantly at the outer-surface inhibit oligomerization. Moreover, specific mutations of MCT8 located in transmembrane helix 2 (del230F, V235M, and ins236V) increased the capacity of MCT8 variants to dimerize. We analyzed the localization of MCT8 dimers in a cellular context, demonstrating differences in MCT8 dimer formation and distribution. In summary, our results add a new link between the functions (substrate transport) and protein organization (dimerization) of MCT8, and might be of relevance for other members of the MFS. Finally, the findings are discussed in relationship to functional data combined with structural-mechanistical insights into MCT8.

Strategies for solid-state NMR investigations of supramolecular assemblies with large subunit sizes
Fricke, P., Chevelkov, V., Shi, C.; Lange, A.
J Magn Reson, 253:2-9
(2015)

Tags: Molecular Biophysics (Lange, A.)

Abstract: Solid-state NMR is a versatile tool to study structure and dynamics of insoluble and non-crystalline biopolymers. Supramolecular protein assemblies are formed by self-association of multiple copies of single small-sized proteins. Because of their high degree of local order, solid-state NMR spectra of such systems exhibit an unusually high level of resolution, rendering them an ideal target for solid-state NMR investigations. Recently, our group has solved the structure of one particular supramolecular assembly, the type-iii-secretion-system needle. The needle subunit comprises around 80 residues. Many interesting supramolecular assemblies with unknown structure have subunits larger in size, which requires development of tailored solid-state NMR strategies to address their structures. In this "Perspective" article, we provide a view on different approaches to enhance sensitivity and resolution in biological solid-state NMR with a focus on the possible application to supramolecular assemblies with large subunit sizes.

Solid-state NMR, electrophysiology and molecular dynamics characterization of human VDAC2
Gattin(*), Z., Schneider(*), R., Laukat(*), Y., Giller(*), K., Maier(*), E., Zweckstetter(*), M., Griesinger(*), C., Benz(*), R., Becker(*), S.; Lange, A.
J. Biomol. NMR, 61:311-320
(2015)

Tags: Molecular Biophysics (Lange, A.)

Abstract: The voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) is the most abundant protein of the outer mitochondrial membrane and constitutes the major pathway for the transport of ADP, ATP, and other metabolites. In this multidisciplinary study we combined solid-state NMR, electrophysiology, and molecular dynamics simulations, to study the structure of the human VDAC isoform 2 in a lipid bilayer environment. We find that the structure of hVDAC2 is similar to the structure of hVDAC1, in line with recent investigations on zfVDAC2. However, hVDAC2 appears to exhibit an increased conformational heterogeneity compared to hVDAC1 which is reflected in broader solid-state NMR spectra and less defined electrophysiological profiles.

Identity crisis in the PMP-22/EMP/MP20/Claudin superfamily (Pfam00822)
Gehne, N., Haseloff, R. F.; Blasig, I. E.
Tissue Barriers, 3:e1089680
(2015)

Tags: Molecular Cell Physiology (Blasig, I.E.)

Diffusional spread and confinement of newly exocytosed synaptic vesicle proteins
Gimber, N., Tadeus, G., Maritzen, T., Schmoranzer, J.; Haucke, V.
Nat Commun, 6:8392
(2015)

Tags: Molecular Pharmacology and Cell Biology (Haucke), Membrane Traffic and Cell Motility (Maritzen)

Abstract: Neurotransmission relies on the calcium-triggered exocytic fusion of non-peptide neurotransmitter-containing small synaptic vesicles (SVs) with the presynaptic membrane at active zones (AZs) followed by compensatory endocytic retrieval of SV membranes. Here, we study the diffusional fate of newly exocytosed SV proteins in hippocampal neurons by high-resolution time-lapse imaging. Newly exocytosed SV proteins rapidly disperse within the first seconds post fusion until confined within the presynaptic bouton. Rapid diffusional spread and confinement is followed by slow reclustering of SV proteins at the periactive endocytic zone. Confinement within the presynaptic bouton is mediated in part by SV protein association with the clathrin-based endocytic machinery to limit diffusional spread of newly exocytosed SV proteins. These data suggest that diffusion, and axonal escape of newly exocytosed vesicle proteins, are counteracted by the clathrin-based endocytic machinery together with a presynaptic diffusion barrier.

Berlin Editorial
Goody(*), R., Haucke, V.; Just(*), W.
FEBS Lett, 589:1515
(2015)

Tags: Molecular Pharmacology and Cell Biology (Haucke)

Selective inhibitors of the protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 block cellular motility and growth of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo
Grosskopf, S., Eckert, C., Arkona(*), C., Radetzki, S., Böhm(*), K., Heinemann(*), U., Wolber(*), G., von Kries, J. P., Birchmeier(*), W.; Rademann(*), J.
Chemmedchem, 10:815-826
(2015)

Tags: Medicinal Chemistry (Rademann), Screening Unit (von Kries)

Abstract: Selective inhibitors of the protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 (src homology region 2 domain phosphatase; PTPN11), an enzyme that is deregulated in numerous human tumors, were generated through a combination of chemical synthesis and structure-based rational design. Seventy pyridazolon-4-ylidenehydrazinyl benzenesulfonates were prepared and evaluated in enzyme assays. The binding modes of active inhibitors were simulated in silico using a newly generated crystal structure of SHP2. The most powerful compound, GS-493 (4-(2Z)-2-[1,3-bis(4-nitrophenyl)-5-oxo-1,5-dihydro-4H-pyrazol-4-yliden]hydrazin obenzenesulfonic acid; 25) inhibited SHP2 with an IC50 value of 71+/-15 nM in the enzyme assay and was 29- and 45-fold more active toward SHP2 than against related SHP1 and PTP1B. In cell culture experiments compound 25 was found to block hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-stimulated epithelial-mesenchymal transition of human pancreatic adenocarcinoma (HPAF) cells, as indicated by a decrease in the minimum neighbor distances of cells. Moreover, 25 inhibited cell colony formation in the non-small-cell lung cancer cell line LXFA 526L in soft agar. Finally, 25 was observed to inhibit tumor growth in a murine xenograft model. Therefore, the novel specific compound 25 strengthens the hypothesis that SHP2 is a relevant protein target for the inhibition of mobility and invasiveness of cancer cells.

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Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (FMP)
Campus Berlin-Buch
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