FMP Publications

Our publications are recorded in a searchable database since 2010, updates will be added regularly.

Year:  
All :: 2010, ... , 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017
Author:  
All :: (, A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W, X, Y, Z 
  
 
Preferences: 
References per page: Show keywords Show abstracts
References
X-exome sequencing of 405 unresolved families identifies seven novel intellectual disability genes
Hu(*), H., Haas(*), S. A., Chelly(*), J., Van Esch(*), H., Raynaud(*), M., de Brouwer(*), A. P., Weinert, S., Froyen(*), G., Frints(*), S. G., Laumonnier, F., Zemojtel(*), T., Love(*), M. I., Richard(*), H., Emde(*), A. K., Bienek(*), M., Jensen(*), C., Hambrock(*), M., Fischer(*), U., Langnick(*), C., Feldkamp(*), M., Wissink-Lindhout(*), W., Lebrun(*), N., Castelnau(*), L., Rucci(*), J., Montjean(*), R., Dorseuil(*), O., Billuart(*), P., Stuhlmann, T., Shaw(*), M., Corbett(*), M. A., Gardner(*), A., Willis-Owen(*), S., Tan(*), C., Friend(*), K. L., Belet(*), S., van Roozendaal(*), K. E., Jimenez-Pocquet(*), M., Moizard(*), M. P., Ronce(*), N., Sun(*), R., O'Keeffe(*), S., Chenna(*), R., van Bommel(*), A., Goke(*), J., Hackett(*), A., Field(*), M., Christie(*), L., Boyle(*), J., Haan(*), E., Nelson(*), J., Turner(*), G., Baynam(*), G., Gillessen-Kaesbach(*), G., Müller, U., Steinberger(*), D., Budny(*), B., Badura-Stronka(*), M., Latos-Bielenska(*), A., Ousager(*), L. B., Wieacker(*), P., Rodriguez Criado(*), G., Bondeson(*), M. L., Anneren(*), G., Dufke(*), A., Cohen(*), M., Van Maldergem(*), L., Vincent-Delorme(*), C., Echenne(*), B., Simon-Bouy(*), B., Kleefstra(*), T., Willemsen(*), M., Fryns(*), J. P., Devriendt(*), K., Ullmann(*), R., Vingron(*), M., Wrogemann(*), K., Wienker(*), T. F., Tzschach(*), A., van Bokhoven(*), H., Gecz(*), J., Jentsch, T. J., Chen(*), W., Ropers(*), H. H.; Kalscheuer(*), V. M.
Molecular psychiatry, 21:133-148
(2016)

Tags: Physiology and Pathology of Ion Transport (Jentsch

Abstract: X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder. During the past two decades in excess of 100 X-chromosome ID genes have been identified. Yet, a large number of families mapping to the X-chromosome remained unresolved suggesting that more XLID genes or loci are yet to be identified. Here, we have investigated 405 unresolved families with XLID. We employed massively parallel sequencing of all X-chromosome exons in the index males. The majority of these males were previously tested negative for copy number variations and for mutations in a subset of known XLID genes by Sanger sequencing. In total, 745 X-chromosomal genes were screened. After stringent filtering, a total of 1297 non-recurrent exonic variants remained for prioritization. Co-segregation analysis of potential clinically relevant changes revealed that 80 families (20%) carried pathogenic variants in established XLID genes. In 19 families, we detected likely causative protein truncating and missense variants in 7 novel and validated XLID genes (CLCN4, CNKSR2, FRMPD4, KLHL15, LAS1L, RLIM and USP27X) and potentially deleterious variants in 2 novel candidate XLID genes (CDK16 and TAF1). We show that the CLCN4 and CNKSR2 variants impair protein functions as indicated by electrophysiological studies and altered differentiation of cultured primary neurons from Clcn4(-/-) mice or after mRNA knock-down. The newly identified and candidate XLID proteins belong to pathways and networks with established roles in cognitive function and intellectual disability in particular. We suggest that systematic sequencing of all X-chromosomal genes in a cohort of patients with genetic evidence for X-chromosome locus involvement may resolve up to 58% of Fragile X-negative cases.

bcTol : a highly water-soluble biradical for efficient dynamic nuclear polarization of biomolecules
Jagtap(*), A. P., Geiger, M. A., Stöppler, D., Orwick-Rydmark, M., Oschkinat, H.; Sigurdsson(*), S. T.
Chem Commun (Camb), 52:7020-7023
(2016)

Tags: NMR-Supported Structural Biology (Oschkinat)

Abstract: Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is an efficient method to overcome the inherent low sensitivity of magic-angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR. We report a new polarizing agent (), designed for biological applications, that yielded an enhancement value of 244 in a microcrystalline SH3 domain sample at 110 K.

In vivo evaluation of riboflavin receptor targeted fluorescent USPIO in mice with prostate cancer xenografts
Jayapaul, J., Arns(*), S., Bunker(*), M., Weiler(*), M., Rutherford(*), S., Comba(*), P.; Kiessling(*), F.
Nano Res, 9:1319-1333
(2016)

Tags: Molecular Imaging (Schröder)

Abstract: Riboflavin (Rf) receptors bind and translocate Rf and its phosphorylated forms (e.g. flavin mononucleotide, FMN) into cells where they mediate various cellular metabolic pathways. Previously, we showed that FMN-coated ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (FLUSPIO) nanoparticles are suitable for labeling metabolically active cancer and endothelial cells in vitro. In this study, we focused on the in vivo application of FLUSPIO using prostate cancer xenografts. Size, charge, and chemical composition of FLUSPIO were evaluated. We explored the in vitro specificity of FLUSPIO for its cellular receptors using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Prussian blue staining. Competitive binding experiments were performed in vivo by injecting free FMN in excess. Bio-distribution of FLUSPIO was determined by estimating iron content in organs and tumors using a colorimetric assay. AFM analysis and zeta potential measurements revealed a particulate morphology approximately 20-40 nm in size and a negative zeta potential (-24.23 +/- 0.15 mV) in water. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry data confirmed FMN present on the USPIO nanoparticle surface. FLUSPIO uptake in prostate cancer cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells was significantly higher than that of control USPIO, while addition of excess of free FMN reduced accumulation. Similarly, in vivo MRI and histology showed specific FLUSPIO uptake by prostate cancer cells, tumor endothelial cells, and tumor-associated macrophages. Besides prominent tumor accumulation, FLUSPIO accumulated in the liver, spleen, lung, and skin. Hence, our data strengthen our hypothesis that targeting riboflavin receptors is an efficient approach to accumulate nanomedicines in tumors opening perspectives for the development of diagnostic and therapeutic systems. ELECTRONIC SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL: Supplementary material is available for this article at 10.1007/s12274-016-1028-7 and is accessible for authorized users.

VRACs and other ion channels and transporters in the regulation of cell volume and beyond
Jentsch, T. J.
Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol, 17:293-307
(2016)

Tags: Physiology and Pathology of Ion Transport (Jentsch)

Abstract: Cells need to regulate their volume to counteract osmotic swelling or shrinkage, as well as during cell division, growth, migration and cell death. Mammalian cells adjust their volume by transporting potassium, sodium, chloride and small organic osmolytes using plasma membrane channels and transporters. This generates osmotic gradients, which drive water in and out of cells. Key players in this process are volume-regulated anion channels (VRACs), the composition of which has recently been identified and shown to encompass LRRC8 heteromers. VRACs also transport metabolites and drugs and function in extracellular signal transduction, apoptosis and anticancer drug resistance.

VRAC: molecular identification as LRRC8 heteromers with differential functions
Jentsch, T. J., Lutter, D., Planells-Cases, R., Ullrich, F.; Voss, F. K.
Pflugers Arch, 468:385-393
(2016)

Tags: Physiology and Pathology of Ion Transport (Jentsch)

Abstract: A major player of vertebrate cell volume regulation is the volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC), which conducts halide ions and organic osmolytes to counteract osmotic imbalances. The molecular entity of this channel was unknown until very recently, although its biophysical characteristics and diverse physiological roles have been extensively studied over the last 30 years. On the road to the molecular identification of VRAC, experimental difficulties led to the proposal of a variety of false candidates. In 2014, in a final breakthrough, two groups independently identified LRRC8A as indispensable component of VRAC. LRRC8A is part of the leucine-rich repeat containing 8 family, which is comprised of five members (LRRC8A-E). Of those, LRRC8A is an obligatory subunit of VRAC but it needs at least one of the other family members to mediate the swelling-induced Cl(-) current ICl,vol. This review discusses the remarkable journey which led to the molecular identification of VRAC, evidence for LRRC8 proteins forming the VRAC pore and their heteromeric assembly. Furthermore, first major insights on the role of LRRC8 proteins in cancer drug resistance and apoptosis and the role of LRRC8D in cisplatin and taurine transport will be summarized.

A phosphoinositide conversion mechanism for exit from endosomes
Ketel, K., Krauss, M., Nicot(*), A. S., Puchkov, D., Wieffer(*), M., Müller(*), R., Subramanian(*), D., Schultz(*), C., Laporte(*), J.; Haucke, V.
Nature, 529:408-412
(2016)

Tags: Molecular Pharmacology and Cell Biology (Haucke), Cellular Imaging (Wiesner/Puchkov)

Abstract: Phosphoinositides are a minor class of short-lived membrane phospholipids that serve crucial functions in cell physiology ranging from cell signalling and motility to their role as signposts of compartmental membrane identity. Phosphoinositide 4-phosphates such as phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI(4)P) and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) are concentrated at the plasma membrane, on secretory organelles, and on lysosomes, whereas phosphoinositide 3-phosphates, most notably phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI(3)P), are a hallmark of the endosomal system. Directional membrane traffic between endosomal and secretory compartments, although inherently complex, therefore requires regulated phosphoinositide conversion. The molecular mechanism underlying this conversion of phosphoinositide identity during cargo exit from endosomes by exocytosis is unknown. Here we report that surface delivery of endosomal cargo requires hydrolysis of PI(3)P by the phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphatase MTM1, an enzyme whose loss of function leads to X-linked centronuclear myopathy (also called myotubular myopathy) in humans. Removal of endosomal PI(3)P by MTM1 is accompanied by phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase-2alpha (PI4K2alpha)-dependent generation of PI(4)P and recruitment of the exocyst tethering complex to enable membrane fusion. Our data establish a mechanism for phosphoinositide conversion from PI(3)P to PI(4)P at endosomes en route to the plasma membrane and suggest that defective phosphoinositide conversion at endosomes underlies X-linked centronuclear myopathy caused by mutation of MTM1 in humans.

Substrate Hunting for the Myxobacterial CYP260A1 Revealed New 1alpha-Hydroxylated Products from C-19 Steroids
Khatri(*), Y., Ringle(*), M., Lisurek, M., von Kries, J. P., Zapp(*), J.; Bernhardt(*), R.
Chembiochem, 17:90-101
(2016)

Tags: Screening Unit (von Kries), Structural Bioinformatics and Protein Design (Krause, G.)

Abstract: Cytochromes P450 catalyze a variety of synthetically useful reactions. However, it is difficult to determine their physiological or artificial functions when a plethora of orphan P450 systems are present in a genome. CYP260A1 from Sorangium cellulosum So ce56 is a new member among the 21 available P450s in the strain. To identify putative substrates for CYP260A1 we used high-throughput screening of a compound library (ca. 17,000 ligands). Structural analogues of the type I hits were searched for biotechnologically relevant compounds, and this led us to select C-19 steroids as potential substrates. We identified efficient surrogate redox partners for CYP260A1, and an Escherichia coli-based whole-cell biocatalyst system was developed to convert testosterone, androstenedione, and their derivatives methyltestosterone and 11-oxoandrostenedione. A detailed (1) H and (13) C NMR characterization of the product(s) from C-19 steroids revealed that CYP260A1 is the very first 1alpha-steroid hydroxylase.

Design and comparison of exchange spectroscopy approaches to cryptophane-xenon host-guest kinetics
Korchak(*), S., Kilian(*), W., Schröder, L.; Mitschang(*), L.
J Magn Reson, 265:139-145
(2016)

Tags: Molecular Imaging (Schröder)

Abstract: Exchange spectroscopy is used in combination with a variation of xenon concentration to disentangle the kinetics of the reversible binding of xenon to cryptophane-A. The signal intensity of either free or crytophane-bound xenon decays in a manner characteristic of the underlying exchange reactions when the spins in the other pool are perturbed. Three experimental approaches, including the well-known Hyper-CEST method, are shown to effectively entail a simple linear dependence of the signal depletion rate, or of a related quantity, on free xenon concentration. This occurs when using spin pool saturation or inversion followed by free exchange. The identification and quantification of contributions to the binding kinetics is then straightforward: in the depletion rate plot, the intercept at the vanishing free xenon concentration represents the kinetic rate coefficient for xenon detachment from the host by dissociative processes while the slope is indicative of the kinetic rate coefficient for degenerate exchange reactions. Comparing quantified kinetic rates for hyperpolarized xenon in aqueous solution reveals the high accuracy of each approach but also shows differences in the precision of the numerical results and in the requirements for prior knowledge. Because of their broad range of applicability the proposed exchange spectroscopy experiments can be readily used to unravel the kinetics of complex formation of xenon with host molecules in the various situations appearing in practice.

Modulation of Hexadecyl-LPA-Mediated Activation of Mast Cells and Microglia by a Chemical Probe for LPA5
Kozian(*), D. H., von Haeften(*), E., Joho(*), S., Czechtizky(*), W., Anumala, U. R., Roux(*), P., Dudda(*), A., Evers(*), A.; Nazare, M.
Chembiochem, 17:861-865
(2016)

Tags: Medicinal Chemistry (Nazare)

Abstract: Mast cells and microglia play a critical role in innate immunity and inflammation and can be activated by a wide range of endogenous and exogenous stimuli. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) has recently been reported to activate mast cells and microglia. Using the human mast cell line HMC-1 and the mouse microglia cell line BV-2, we show that LPA-mediated activation can be prevented by blockade of the LPA receptor 5 (LPA5) in both cell lines. The identification of new LPA5-specific antagonists as tool compounds to probe and modulate the LPA5/LPA axis in relevant in vitro and in vivo assays should contribute to better understanding of the underlying role of LPAs in the development and progression of (neuro-) inflammatory diseases.

Directing lipid transport at membrane contact sites
Krauss, M.; Haucke, V.
Nat Cell Biol, 18:461-463
(2016)

Tags: Molecular Pharmacology and Cell Biology (Haucke)

Abstract: Contact sites between the endoplasmic reticulum and the plasma membrane mediate receptor signalling. How this function is controlled physically and functionally is poorly understood. Extended synaptotagmins are now shown to shuttle the lipid metabolite diacylglycerol from the plasma membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum in receptor-stimulated cells.

Page:  
Previous | 1, ... , 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, ... , 11 | Next
Export as:
BibTeX, XML

Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (FMP)
Campus Berlin-Buch
Robert-Roessle-Str. 10
13125 Berlin, Germany
+4930 94793 - 100 
+4930 94793 - 109 (Fax)
info(at)fmp-berlin.de

Like many sites, we use cookies to optimize the user's browsing experience. Data Protection OK