FMP Publications

Our publications are recorded in a searchable database since 2010, updates will be added regularly.

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References
X-exome sequencing of 405 unresolved families identifies seven novel intellectual disability genes
Hu(*), H., Haas(*), S. A., Chelly(*), J., Van Esch(*), H., Raynaud(*), M., de Brouwer(*), A. P., Weinert, S., Froyen(*), G., Frints(*), S. G., Laumonnier, F., Zemojtel(*), T., Love(*), M. I., Richard(*), H., Emde(*), A. K., Bienek(*), M., Jensen(*), C., Hambrock(*), M., Fischer(*), U., Langnick(*), C., Feldkamp(*), M., Wissink-Lindhout(*), W., Lebrun(*), N., Castelnau(*), L., Rucci(*), J., Montjean(*), R., Dorseuil(*), O., Billuart(*), P., Stuhlmann, T., Shaw(*), M., Corbett(*), M. A., Gardner(*), A., Willis-Owen(*), S., Tan(*), C., Friend(*), K. L., Belet(*), S., van Roozendaal(*), K. E., Jimenez-Pocquet(*), M., Moizard(*), M. P., Ronce(*), N., Sun(*), R., O'Keeffe(*), S., Chenna(*), R., van Bommel(*), A., Goke(*), J., Hackett(*), A., Field(*), M., Christie(*), L., Boyle(*), J., Haan(*), E., Nelson(*), J., Turner(*), G., Baynam(*), G., Gillessen-Kaesbach(*), G., Müller, U., Steinberger(*), D., Budny(*), B., Badura-Stronka(*), M., Latos-Bielenska(*), A., Ousager(*), L. B., Wieacker(*), P., Rodriguez Criado(*), G., Bondeson(*), M. L., Anneren(*), G., Dufke(*), A., Cohen(*), M., Van Maldergem(*), L., Vincent-Delorme(*), C., Echenne(*), B., Simon-Bouy(*), B., Kleefstra(*), T., Willemsen(*), M., Fryns(*), J. P., Devriendt(*), K., Ullmann(*), R., Vingron(*), M., Wrogemann(*), K., Wienker(*), T. F., Tzschach(*), A., van Bokhoven(*), H., Gecz(*), J., Jentsch, T. J., Chen(*), W., Ropers(*), H. H.; Kalscheuer(*), V. M.
Molecular psychiatry, 21:133-148
(2016)

Tags: Physiology and Pathology of Ion Transport (Jentsch

Abstract: X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder. During the past two decades in excess of 100 X-chromosome ID genes have been identified. Yet, a large number of families mapping to the X-chromosome remained unresolved suggesting that more XLID genes or loci are yet to be identified. Here, we have investigated 405 unresolved families with XLID. We employed massively parallel sequencing of all X-chromosome exons in the index males. The majority of these males were previously tested negative for copy number variations and for mutations in a subset of known XLID genes by Sanger sequencing. In total, 745 X-chromosomal genes were screened. After stringent filtering, a total of 1297 non-recurrent exonic variants remained for prioritization. Co-segregation analysis of potential clinically relevant changes revealed that 80 families (20%) carried pathogenic variants in established XLID genes. In 19 families, we detected likely causative protein truncating and missense variants in 7 novel and validated XLID genes (CLCN4, CNKSR2, FRMPD4, KLHL15, LAS1L, RLIM and USP27X) and potentially deleterious variants in 2 novel candidate XLID genes (CDK16 and TAF1). We show that the CLCN4 and CNKSR2 variants impair protein functions as indicated by electrophysiological studies and altered differentiation of cultured primary neurons from Clcn4(-/-) mice or after mRNA knock-down. The newly identified and candidate XLID proteins belong to pathways and networks with established roles in cognitive function and intellectual disability in particular. We suggest that systematic sequencing of all X-chromosomal genes in a cohort of patients with genetic evidence for X-chromosome locus involvement may resolve up to 58% of Fragile X-negative cases.

De novo and inherited mutations in the X-linked gene CLCN4 are associated with syndromic intellectual disability and behavior and seizure disorders in males and females
Palmer(*), E. E., Stuhlmann, T., Weinert, S., Haan(*), E., Van Esch(*), H., Holvoet(*), M., Boyle(*), J., Leffler(*), M., Raynaud(*), M., Moraine(*), C., van Bokhoven(*), H., Kleefstra(*), T., Kahrizi(*), K., Najmabadi(*), H., Ropers(*), H. H., Delgado(*), M. R., Sirsi(*), D., Golla(*), S., Sommer(*), A., Pietryga(*), M. P., Chung(*), W. K., Wynn(*), J., Rohena(*), L., Bernardo(*), E., Hamlin(*), D., Faux(*), B. M., Grange(*), D. K., Manwaring(*), L., Tolmie(*), J., Joss(*), S., Cobben(*), J. M., Duijkers(*), F. A., Goehringer(*), J. M., Challman(*), T. D., Hennig(*), F., Fischer(*), U., Grimme(*), A., Suckow(*), V., Musante(*), L., Nicholl(*), J., Shaw(*), M., Lodh(*), S. P., Niu(*), Z., Rosenfeld(*), J. A., Stankiewicz(*), P., Jentsch, T. J., Gecz(*), J., Field(*), M.; Kalscheuer(*), V. M.
Molecular psychiatry,
(2016)

Tags: Physiology and Pathology of Ion Transport (Jentsch)

Abstract: Variants in CLCN4, which encodes the chloride/hydrogen ion exchanger CIC-4 prominently expressed in brain, were recently described to cause X-linked intellectual disability and epilepsy. We present detailed phenotypic information on 52 individuals from 16 families with CLCN4-related disorder: 5 affected females and 2 affected males with a de novo variant in CLCN4 (6 individuals previously unreported) and 27 affected males, 3 affected females and 15 asymptomatic female carriers from 9 families with inherited CLCN4 variants (4 families previously unreported). Intellectual disability ranged from borderline to profound. Behavioral and psychiatric disorders were common in both child- and adulthood, and included autistic features, mood disorders, obsessive-compulsive behaviors and hetero- and autoaggression. Epilepsy was common, with severity ranging from epileptic encephalopathy to well-controlled seizures. Several affected individuals showed white matter changes on cerebral neuroimaging and progressive neurological symptoms, including movement disorders and spasticity. Heterozygous females can be as severely affected as males. The variability of symptoms in females is not correlated with the X inactivation pattern studied in their blood. The mutation spectrum includes frameshift, missense and splice site variants and one single-exon deletion. All missense variants were predicted to affect CLCN4's function based on in silico tools and either segregated with the phenotype in the family or were de novo. Pathogenicity of all previously unreported missense variants was further supported by electrophysiological studies in Xenopus laevis oocytes. We compare CLCN4-related disorder with conditions related to dysfunction of other members of the CLC family.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 23 August 2016; doi:10.1038/mp.2016.135.

Modulation of Hexadecyl-LPA-Mediated Activation of Mast Cells and Microglia by a Chemical Probe for LPA5
Kozian(*), D. H., von Haeften(*), E., Joho(*), S., Czechtizky(*), W., Anumala, U. R., Roux(*), P., Dudda(*), A., Evers(*), A.; Nazare, M.
Chembiochem, 17:861-865
(2016)

Tags: Medicinal Chemistry (Nazare)

Abstract: Mast cells and microglia play a critical role in innate immunity and inflammation and can be activated by a wide range of endogenous and exogenous stimuli. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) has recently been reported to activate mast cells and microglia. Using the human mast cell line HMC-1 and the mouse microglia cell line BV-2, we show that LPA-mediated activation can be prevented by blockade of the LPA receptor 5 (LPA5) in both cell lines. The identification of new LPA5-specific antagonists as tool compounds to probe and modulate the LPA5/LPA axis in relevant in vitro and in vivo assays should contribute to better understanding of the underlying role of LPAs in the development and progression of (neuro-) inflammatory diseases.

A Complex of Htm1 and the Oxidoreductase Pdi1 Accelerates Degradation of Misfolded Glycoproteins
Pfeiffer(*), A., Stephanowitz, H., Krause, E., Volkwein(*), C., Hirsch(*), C., Jarosch(*), E.; Sommer(*), T.
J Biol Chem, 291:12195-12207
(2016)

Tags: Mass Spectrometry (Krause, E.)

Abstract: A quality control system in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) efficiently discriminates polypeptides that are in the process of productive folding from conformers that are trapped in an aberrant state. Only the latter are transported into the cytoplasm and degraded in a process termed ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD). In the ER, an enzymatic cascade generates a specific N-glycan structure of seven mannosyl and two N-acetylglucosamine residues (Man7GlcNAc2) on misfolded glycoproteins to facilitate their disposal. We show that a complex encompassing the yeast lectin-like protein Htm1 and the oxidoreductase Pdi1 converts Man8GlcNAc2 on glycoproteins into the Man7GlcNAc2 signal. In vitro the Htm1-Pdi1 complex processes both unfolded and native proteins albeit with a preference for the former. In vivo, elevated expression of HTM1 causes glycan trimming on misfolded and folded proteins, but only degradation of the non-native species is accelerated. Thus, modification with a Man7GlcNAc2 structure does not inevitably commit a protein for ER-associated protein degradation. The function of Htm1 in ERAD relies on its association with Pdi1, which appears to regulate the access to substrates. Our data support a model in which the balanced activities of Pdi1 and Htm1 are crucial determinants for the efficient removal of misfolded secretory glycoproteins.

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Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (FMP)
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