FMP Publications

Our publications are recorded in a searchable database since 2010, updates will be added regularly.

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References
Substrate Hunting for the Myxobacterial CYP260A1 Revealed New 1alpha-Hydroxylated Products from C-19 Steroids
Khatri(*), Y., Ringle(*), M., Lisurek, M., von Kries, J. P., Zapp(*), J.; Bernhardt(*), R.
Chembiochem, 17:90-101
(2016)

Tags: Screening Unit (von Kries), Structural Bioinformatics and Protein Design (Krause, G.)

Abstract: Cytochromes P450 catalyze a variety of synthetically useful reactions. However, it is difficult to determine their physiological or artificial functions when a plethora of orphan P450 systems are present in a genome. CYP260A1 from Sorangium cellulosum So ce56 is a new member among the 21 available P450s in the strain. To identify putative substrates for CYP260A1 we used high-throughput screening of a compound library (ca. 17,000 ligands). Structural analogues of the type I hits were searched for biotechnologically relevant compounds, and this led us to select C-19 steroids as potential substrates. We identified efficient surrogate redox partners for CYP260A1, and an Escherichia coli-based whole-cell biocatalyst system was developed to convert testosterone, androstenedione, and their derivatives methyltestosterone and 11-oxoandrostenedione. A detailed (1) H and (13) C NMR characterization of the product(s) from C-19 steroids revealed that CYP260A1 is the very first 1alpha-steroid hydroxylase.

Specific binding of a mutated fragment of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin to endothelial claudin-5 and its modulation of cerebral vascular permeability
Liao(*), Z., Yang(*), Z., Piontek, A., Eichner(*), M., Krause, G., Li(*), L., Piontek(*), J.; Zhang(*), J.
Neuroscience, 327:53-63
(2016)

Tags: Structural Bioinformatics and Protein Design (Krause, G.)

Abstract: The vertebrate blood-brain barrier (BBB) creates an obstacle for central nervous system-related drug delivery. Claudin-5 (Cldn5), expressed in large quantities in BBB, plays a vital role in restricting BBB permeability. The C-terminal domain of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (cCPE) has been verified as binding to a subset of claudins (Cldns). The Cldn5-binding cCPE194-319 variant cCPEY306W/S313H was applied in this study to investigate its ability to modulate the permeability of zebrafish larval BBB. In vitro results showed that cCPEY306W/S313H is able to bind specifically to Cldn5 in murine brain vascular endothelial (bEnd.3) cells, and is transported along with Cldn5 from the cell membrane to the cytoplasm, which in turn results in a reduction in transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER). Conversely, this effect can be reversed by removal of cCPEY306W/S313H. In an in vivo experiment, this study estimates the capability of cCPEY306W/S313H to modulate Cldn5 using a rhodamine B-Dextran dye diffusion assay in zebrafish larval BBB. The results show that cCPEY306W/S313H co-localized with Cldn5 in zebrafish cerebral vascular cells and modulated BBB permeability, resulting in dye leakage. Taken together, this study suggests that cCPEY306W/S313H has the capability - both in vitro and in vivo - to modulate BBB permeability temporarily by specific binding to Cldn5.

Bimodal antagonism of PKA signalling by ARHGAP36
Eccles(*), R. L., Czajkowski(*), M. T., Barth(*), C., Müller(*), P. M., McShane(*), E., Grunwald(*), S., Beaudette(*), P., Mecklenburg(*), N., Volkmer, R., Zühlke(*), K., Dittmar(*), G., Selbach(*), M., Hammes(*), A., Daumke(*), O., Klussmann(*), E., Urbe(*), S.; Rocks(*), O.
Nat Commun, 7:12963
(2016)

Tags: Peptide Synthesis (Hackenberger/Volkmer)

Abstract: Protein kinase A is a key mediator of cAMP signalling downstream of G-protein-coupled receptors, a signalling pathway conserved in all eukaryotes. cAMP binding to the regulatory subunits (PKAR) relieves their inhibition of the catalytic subunits (PKAC). Here we report that ARHGAP36 combines two distinct inhibitory mechanisms to antagonise PKA signalling. First, it blocks PKAC activity via a pseudosubstrate motif, akin to the mechanism employed by the protein kinase inhibitor proteins. Second, it targets PKAC for rapid ubiquitin-mediated lysosomal degradation, a pathway usually reserved for transmembrane receptors. ARHGAP36 thus dampens the sensitivity of cells to cAMP. We show that PKA inhibition by ARHGAP36 promotes derepression of the Hedgehog signalling pathway, thereby providing a simple rationale for the upregulation of ARHGAP36 in medulloblastoma. Our work reveals a new layer of PKA regulation that may play an important role in development and disease.

AKAP18:PKA-RIIalpha structure reveals crucial anchor points for recognition of regulatory subunits of PKA
Götz, F., Roske(*), Y., Schulz(*), M. S., Autenrieth(*), K., Bertinetti(*), D., Faelber(*), K., Zühlke(*), K., Kreuchwig, A., Kennedy(*), E. J., Krause, G., Daumke(*), O., Herberg(*), F. W., Heinemann(*), U.; Klussmann(*), E.
Biochem J, 473:1881-1894
(2016)

Tags: Structural Bioinformatics and Protein Design (Krause, G.), Anchored Signaling (Klussmann)

Abstract: A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) interact with the dimerization/docking (D/D) domains of regulatory subunits of the ubiquitous protein kinase A (PKA). AKAPs tether PKA to defined cellular compartments establishing distinct pools to increase the specificity of PKA signalling. Here, we elucidated the structure of an extended PKA-binding domain of AKAP18beta bound to the D/D domain of the regulatory RIIalpha subunits of PKA. We identified three hydrophilic anchor points in AKAP18beta outside the core PKA-binding domain, which mediate contacts with the D/D domain. Such anchor points are conserved within AKAPs that bind regulatory RII subunits of PKA. We derived a different set of anchor points in AKAPs binding regulatory RI subunits of PKA. In vitro and cell-based experiments confirm the relevance of these sites for the interaction of RII subunits with AKAP18 and of RI subunits with the RI-specific smAKAP. Thus we report a novel mechanism governing interactions of AKAPs with PKA. The sequence specificity of each AKAP around the anchor points and the requirement of these points for the tight binding of PKA allow the development of selective inhibitors to unequivocally ascribe cellular functions to the AKAP18-PKA and other AKAP-PKA interactions.

1H, 13C and 15N backbone resonance assignment of the intrinsically disordered region of the nuclear envelope protein emerin
Samson(*), C., Herrada(*), I., Celli(*), F., Theillet, F. X.; Zinn-Justin(*), S.
Biomol NMR Assign, 10:179-182
(2016)

Tags: In-Cell NMR (Selenko)

Abstract: Human emerin is an inner nuclear membrane protein involved in the response of the nucleus to mechanical stress. It contributes to the physical connection between the cytoskeleton and the nucleoskeleton. It is also involved in chromatin organization. Its N-terminal region is nucleoplasmic and comprises a globular LEM domain from residue 1 to residue 43. The three-dimensional structure of this LEM domain in complex with the chromatin BAF protein was solved from NMR data. Apart from the LEM domain, the nucleoplasmic region of emerin, from residue 44 to residue 221, is predicted to be intrinsically disordered. Mutations in this region impair binding to several emerin partners as lamin A, actin or HDAC3. However the molecular details of these recognition defects are unknown. Here we report (1)H, (15)N, (13)CO, (13)Calpha and (13)Cbeta NMR chemical shift assignments of the emerin fragment from residue 67 to residue 170, which is sufficient for nuclear localization and involved in lamin A binding. Chemical shift analysis confirms that this fragment is intrinsically disordered in 0 and 8 M urea.

Progesterone, estrogen, and androgen receptors in the corpus luteum of the domestic cat, Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus) and Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx)
Amelkina(*), O., Zschockelt(*), L., Painer(*), J., Serra(*), R., Villaespesa(*), F., Krause, E., Jewgenow(*), K.; Braun(*), B. C.
Theriogenology, 86:2107-2118
(2016)

Tags: Mass Spectrometry (Krause, E.)

Abstract: In contrast to the species studied, the corpus luteum (CL) of Iberian and Eurasian lynx physiologically persists in the ovary for more than 2 years and continues to secrete progesterone. Such persistent CL (perCL) transition into the next cycle and are present in the ovary together with the freshly formed CL (frCL) of a new ovulation. To date, the mechanisms supporting such CL persistence are not known. We analyzed the potential receptivity of feline CL to sex steroids through mRNA measurements of progesterone receptor (PGR), progesterone receptor membrane components (PGRMC) 1 and 2, estrogen receptor (ESR) 1 and ESR2, G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER1), and androgen receptor (AR). All receptors were present in domestic cat CL during pregnancy and the nonpregnant luteal phase, in frCL and perCL of post-mating Iberian lynx and in perCL of pre-mating Eurasian lynx. Mass spectrometry detected the presence of PGRMC1 protein in frCL and perCL of the Iberian lynx. In both domestic cat and lynx CL, PGR, PGRMC1, and ESR1 proteins were localized in luteal cells by immunohistochemistry. The mRNA levels of PGR, PGRMC1, PGRMC2, ESR1, and AR changed significantly throughout the domestic cat luteal phase. This may indicate involvement of these receptors in the processes of formation, maintenance, and regression of feline CL. In Iberian lynx, expression of PGRMC1, PGRCM2, ESR1, GPER1, and AR was significantly higher in perCL compared with frCL, whereas ESR2 was reversed. High mRNA amounts of these receptors in perCL suggest that physiological persistence of lynx CL may be partly regulated by actions of sex steroids through their nuclear and/or membrane receptors.

A Small-Molecule Antagonist of the beta-Catenin/TCF4 Interaction Blocks the Self-Renewal of Cancer Stem Cells and Suppresses Tumorigenesis
Fang(*), L., Zhu(*), Q., Neuenschwander, M., Specker, E., Wulf-Goldenberg(*), A., Weis(*), W. I., von Kries, J. P.; Birchmeier(*), W.
Cancer research, 76:891-901
(2016)

Tags: Screening Unit (von Kries)

Abstract: Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is a highly conserved pathway essential for embryogenesis and tissue homeostasis. However, deregulation of this pathway can initiate and promote human malignancies, especially of the colon and head and neck. Therefore, Wnt/beta-catenin signaling represents an attractive target for cancer therapy. We performed high-throughput screening using AlphaScreen and ELISA techniques to identify small molecules that disrupt the critical interaction between beta-catenin and the transcription factor TCF4 required for signal transduction. We found that compound LF3, a 4-thioureido-benzenesulfonamide derivative, robustly inhibited this interaction. Biochemical assays revealed clues that the core structure of LF3 was essential for inhibition. LF3 inhibited Wnt/beta-catenin signals in cells with exogenous reporters and in colon cancer cells with endogenously high Wnt activity. LF3 also suppressed features of cancer cells related to Wnt signaling, including high cell motility, cell-cycle progression, and the overexpression of Wnt target genes. However, LF3 did not cause cell death or interfere with cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion. Remarkably, the self-renewal capacity of cancer stem cells was blocked by LF3 in concentration-dependent manners, as examined by sphere formation of colon and head and neck cancer stem cells under nonadherent conditions. Finally, LF3 reduced tumor growth and induced differentiation in a mouse xenograft model of colon cancer. Collectively, our results strongly suggest that LF3 is a specific inhibitor of canonical Wnt signaling with anticancer activity that warrants further development for preclinical and clinical studies as a novel cancer therapy.

TNF induced cleavage of HSP90 by cathepsin D potentiates apoptotic cell death
Fritsch(*), J., Fickers(*), R., Klawitter(*), J., Särchen(*), V., Zingler(*), P., Adam(*), D., Janssen(*), O., Krause, E.; Schütze(*), S.
Oncotarget, 7:75774-75789
(2016)

Tags: Mass Spectrometry (Krause, E.)

Abstract: During apoptosis induction by TNF, the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptosis pathways converge at the lysosomal-mitochondrial interface. Earlier studies showed that the lysosomal aspartic protease Cathepsin D (CtsD) cleaves Bid to tBid, resulting in the amplification of the initial apoptotic cascade via mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP).The goal of this study was to identify further targets for CtsD that might be involved in activation upon death receptor ligation. Using a proteomics screen, we identified the heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) to be cleaved by CtsD after stimulation of U937 or other cell lines with TNF, FasL and TRAIL. HSP90 cleavage corresponded to apoptosis sensitivity of the cell lines to the different stimuli. After mutation of the cleavage site, HSP90 partially prevented apoptosis induction in U937 and Jurkat cells. Overexpression of the cleavage fragments in U937 and Jurkat cells showed no effect on apoptosis, excluding a direct pro-apoptotic function of these fragments. Pharmacological inhibition of HSP90 with 17AAG boosted ligand mediated apoptosis by enhancing Bid cleavage and caspase-9 activation. Together, we demonstrated that HSP90 plays an anti-apoptotic role in death receptor signalling and that CtsD-mediated cleavage of HSP90 sensitizes cells for apoptosis. These findings identify HSP90 as a potential target for cancer therapy in combination with death ligands (e.g. TNF or TRAIL).

Temperature dependence of cross-effect dynamic nuclear polarization in rotating solids: advantages of elevated temperatures
Geiger, M. A., Orwick-Rydmark, M., Marker, K., Franks, W. T., Akhmetzyanov(*), D., Stöppler, D., Zinke, M., Specker, E., Nazare, M., Diehl, A., van Rossum, B. J., Aussenac(*), F., Prisner(*), T., Akbey, Ü.; Oschkinat, H.
Phys Chem Chem Phys, 18:30696-30704
(2016)

Tags: NMR-Supported Structural Biology (Oschkinat), Medicinal Chemistry (Nazare), Molecular Biophysics (Lange, A.)

Abstract: Dynamic nuclear polarization exploits electron spin polarization to boost signal-to-noise in magic-angle-spinning (MAS) NMR, creating new opportunities in materials science, structural biology, and metabolomics studies. Since protein NMR spectra recorded under DNP conditions can show improved spectral resolution at 180-200 K compared to 110 K, we investigate the effects of AMUPol and various deuterated TOTAPOL isotopologues on sensitivity and spectral resolution at these temperatures, using proline and reproducibly prepared SH3 domain samples. The TOTAPOL deuteration pattern is optimized for protein DNP MAS NMR, and signal-to-noise per unit time measurements demonstrate the high value of TOTAPOL isotopologues for Protein DNP MAS NMR at 180-200 K. The combined effects of enhancement, depolarization, and proton longitudinal relaxation are surprisingly sample-specific. At 200 K, DNP on SH3 domain standard samples yields a 15-fold increase in signal-to-noise over a sample without radicals. 2D and 3D NCACX/NCOCX spectra were recorded at 200 K within 1 and 13 hours, respectively. Decreasing enhancements with increasing 2H-content at the CH2 sites of the TEMPO rings in CD3-TOTAPOL highlight the importance of protons in a sphere of 4-6 A around the nitroxyl group, presumably for polarization pickup from electron spins.

X-exome sequencing of 405 unresolved families identifies seven novel intellectual disability genes
Hu(*), H., Haas(*), S. A., Chelly(*), J., Van Esch(*), H., Raynaud(*), M., de Brouwer(*), A. P., Weinert, S., Froyen(*), G., Frints(*), S. G., Laumonnier, F., Zemojtel(*), T., Love(*), M. I., Richard(*), H., Emde(*), A. K., Bienek(*), M., Jensen(*), C., Hambrock(*), M., Fischer(*), U., Langnick(*), C., Feldkamp(*), M., Wissink-Lindhout(*), W., Lebrun(*), N., Castelnau(*), L., Rucci(*), J., Montjean(*), R., Dorseuil(*), O., Billuart(*), P., Stuhlmann, T., Shaw(*), M., Corbett(*), M. A., Gardner(*), A., Willis-Owen(*), S., Tan(*), C., Friend(*), K. L., Belet(*), S., van Roozendaal(*), K. E., Jimenez-Pocquet(*), M., Moizard(*), M. P., Ronce(*), N., Sun(*), R., O'Keeffe(*), S., Chenna(*), R., van Bommel(*), A., Goke(*), J., Hackett(*), A., Field(*), M., Christie(*), L., Boyle(*), J., Haan(*), E., Nelson(*), J., Turner(*), G., Baynam(*), G., Gillessen-Kaesbach(*), G., Müller, U., Steinberger(*), D., Budny(*), B., Badura-Stronka(*), M., Latos-Bielenska(*), A., Ousager(*), L. B., Wieacker(*), P., Rodriguez Criado(*), G., Bondeson(*), M. L., Anneren(*), G., Dufke(*), A., Cohen(*), M., Van Maldergem(*), L., Vincent-Delorme(*), C., Echenne(*), B., Simon-Bouy(*), B., Kleefstra(*), T., Willemsen(*), M., Fryns(*), J. P., Devriendt(*), K., Ullmann(*), R., Vingron(*), M., Wrogemann(*), K., Wienker(*), T. F., Tzschach(*), A., van Bokhoven(*), H., Gecz(*), J., Jentsch, T. J., Chen(*), W., Ropers(*), H. H.; Kalscheuer(*), V. M.
Molecular psychiatry, 21:133-148
(2016)

Tags: Physiology and Pathology of Ion Transport (Jentsch

Abstract: X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder. During the past two decades in excess of 100 X-chromosome ID genes have been identified. Yet, a large number of families mapping to the X-chromosome remained unresolved suggesting that more XLID genes or loci are yet to be identified. Here, we have investigated 405 unresolved families with XLID. We employed massively parallel sequencing of all X-chromosome exons in the index males. The majority of these males were previously tested negative for copy number variations and for mutations in a subset of known XLID genes by Sanger sequencing. In total, 745 X-chromosomal genes were screened. After stringent filtering, a total of 1297 non-recurrent exonic variants remained for prioritization. Co-segregation analysis of potential clinically relevant changes revealed that 80 families (20%) carried pathogenic variants in established XLID genes. In 19 families, we detected likely causative protein truncating and missense variants in 7 novel and validated XLID genes (CLCN4, CNKSR2, FRMPD4, KLHL15, LAS1L, RLIM and USP27X) and potentially deleterious variants in 2 novel candidate XLID genes (CDK16 and TAF1). We show that the CLCN4 and CNKSR2 variants impair protein functions as indicated by electrophysiological studies and altered differentiation of cultured primary neurons from Clcn4(-/-) mice or after mRNA knock-down. The newly identified and candidate XLID proteins belong to pathways and networks with established roles in cognitive function and intellectual disability in particular. We suggest that systematic sequencing of all X-chromosomal genes in a cohort of patients with genetic evidence for X-chromosome locus involvement may resolve up to 58% of Fragile X-negative cases.

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Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (FMP)
Campus Berlin-Buch
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