FMP Publications

Our publications are recorded in a searchable database since 2010, updates will be added regularly.

Year:  
All :: 2010, ... , 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017
Author:  
All :: (, A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W, X, Y, Z 
  
 
Preferences: 
References per page: Show keywords Show abstracts
References
Structural biology applications of solid state MAS DNP NMR
Akbey(*), Ü.; Oschkinat, H.
J Magn Reson, 269:213-224
(2016)

Tags: NMR-Supported Structural Biology (Oschkinat)

Abstract: Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) has long been an aim for increasing sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, delivering spectra in shorter experiment times or of smaller sample amounts. In recent years, it has been applied in magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR to a large range of samples, including biological macromolecules and functional materials. New research directions in structural biology can be envisaged by DNP, facilitating investigations on very large complexes or very heterogeneous samples. Here we present a summary of state of the art DNP MAS NMR spectroscopy and its applications to structural biology, discussing the technical challenges and factors affecting DNP performance.

Progesterone, estrogen, and androgen receptors in the corpus luteum of the domestic cat, Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus) and Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx)
Amelkina(*), O., Zschockelt(*), L., Painer(*), J., Serra(*), R., Villaespesa(*), F., Krause, E., Jewgenow(*), K.; Braun(*), B. C.
Theriogenology, 86:2107-2118
(2016)

Tags: Mass Spectrometry (Krause, E.)

Abstract: In contrast to the species studied, the corpus luteum (CL) of Iberian and Eurasian lynx physiologically persists in the ovary for more than 2 years and continues to secrete progesterone. Such persistent CL (perCL) transition into the next cycle and are present in the ovary together with the freshly formed CL (frCL) of a new ovulation. To date, the mechanisms supporting such CL persistence are not known. We analyzed the potential receptivity of feline CL to sex steroids through mRNA measurements of progesterone receptor (PGR), progesterone receptor membrane components (PGRMC) 1 and 2, estrogen receptor (ESR) 1 and ESR2, G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER1), and androgen receptor (AR). All receptors were present in domestic cat CL during pregnancy and the nonpregnant luteal phase, in frCL and perCL of post-mating Iberian lynx and in perCL of pre-mating Eurasian lynx. Mass spectrometry detected the presence of PGRMC1 protein in frCL and perCL of the Iberian lynx. In both domestic cat and lynx CL, PGR, PGRMC1, and ESR1 proteins were localized in luteal cells by immunohistochemistry. The mRNA levels of PGR, PGRMC1, PGRMC2, ESR1, and AR changed significantly throughout the domestic cat luteal phase. This may indicate involvement of these receptors in the processes of formation, maintenance, and regression of feline CL. In Iberian lynx, expression of PGRMC1, PGRCM2, ESR1, GPER1, and AR was significantly higher in perCL compared with frCL, whereas ESR2 was reversed. High mRNA amounts of these receptors in perCL suggest that physiological persistence of lynx CL may be partly regulated by actions of sex steroids through their nuclear and/or membrane receptors.

Chemical fragment arrays for rapid druggability assessment
Aretz(*), J., Kondoh(*), Y., Honda(*), K., Anumala, U. R., Nazare, M., Watanabe(*), N., Osada(*), H.; Rademacher(*), C.
Chem Commun (Camb), 52:9067-9070
(2016)

Tags: Medicinal Chemistry (Nazare)

Abstract: Incorporation of early druggability assessment in the drug discovery process provides a means to prioritize target proteins for high-throughput screening. We present chemical fragment arrays as a method that is capable of determining the druggability of a given target with low protein and compound consumption, enabling rapid decision making during early phases of drug discovery.

Urolinin: The First Linear Peptidic Urotensin-II Receptor Agonist
Bandholtz(*), S., Erdmann(*), S., von Hacht(*), J. L., Exner(*), S., Krause, G., Kleinau(*), G.; Grotzinger(*), C.
Journal of medicinal chemistry, 59:10100-10112
(2016)

Tags: Structural Bioinformatics and Protein Design (Krause, G.)

Abstract: This study investigated the role of individual U-II amino acid positions and side chain characteristics important for U-IIR activation. A complete permutation library of 209 U-II variants was studied in an activity screen that contained single substitution variants of each position with one of the other 19 proteinogenic amino acids. Receptor activation was measured using a cell-based high-throughput fluorescence calcium mobilization assay. We generated the first complete U-II substitution map for U-II receptor activation, resulting in a detailed view into the structural features required for receptor activation, accompanied by complementary information from receptor modeling and ligand docking studies. On the basis of the systematic SAR study of U-II, we created 33 further short and linear U-II variants from eight to three amino acids in length, including d- and other non-natural amino acids. We identified the first high-potency linear U-II analogues. Urolinin, a linear U-II agonist (nWWK-Tyr(3-NO2)-Abu), shows low nanomolar potency as well as improved metabolic stability.

Dynamics of the Ligand Binding Domain Layer during AMPA Receptor Activation
Baranovic, J., Chebli, M., Salazar, H., Carbone, A. L., Faelber(*), K., Lau(*), A. Y., Daumke(*), O.; Plested, A. J.
Biophys J, 110:896-911
(2016)

Tags: Molecular Neuroscience and Biophysics (Plested)

Abstract: Ionotropic glutamate receptors are postsynaptic tetrameric ligand-gated channels whose activity mediates fast excitatory transmission. Glutamate binding to clamshell-shaped ligand binding domains (LBDs) triggers opening of the integral ion channel, but how the four LBDs orchestrate receptor activation is unknown. Here, we present a high-resolution x-ray crystal structure displaying two tetrameric LBD arrangements fully bound to glutamate. Using a series of engineered metal ion trapping mutants, we showed that the more compact of the two assemblies corresponds to an arrangement populated during activation of full-length receptors. State-dependent cross-linking of the mutants identified zinc bridges between the canonical active LBD dimers that formed when the tetramer was either fully or partially bound by glutamate. These bridges also stabilized the resting state, consistent with the recently published full-length apo structure. Our results provide insight into the activation mechanism of glutamate receptors and the complex conformational space that the LBD layer can sample.

How to build the fastest receptor on earth
Baranovic, J.; Plested, A. J. R.
Biol Chem, 397:195-205
(2016)

Tags: (Molecular Neuroscience and Biophysics (Plested)

Abstract: In 2014, a slew of structures of glutamate receptors were published, based on crystallography and electron microscopy. Here we review these insights, integrate them with existing knowledge about receptor function and try to understand how the structures relate to the key property of the AMPA receptor - its speed.

Organophosphorus-mediated N-N bond formation: facile access to 3-amino-2H-indazoles
Bel Abed, H., Schöne, J., Christmann(*), M.; Nazare, M.
Org Biomol Chem, 14:8520-8528
(2016)

Tags: Medicinal Chemistry (Nazare)

Abstract: A convenient and efficient strategy has been devised to access 3-amino-2H-indazole derivatives in two steps from readily available starting materials. The conversion of 2-nitrobenzonitriles to substituted benzamidines followed by an organophosphorus-mediated reductive cyclization and a subsequent N-N bond formation afforded 3-amino-2H-indazoles in good to excellent yields.

Chemoselective synthesis and analysis of naturally occurring phosphorylated cysteine peptides
Bertran-Vicente, J., Penkert, M., Nieto-Garcia, O., Jeckelmann(*), J. M., Schmieder, P., Krause, E.; Hackenberger, C. P.
Nat Commun, 7:12703
(2016)

Tags: Chemical Biology II (Hackenberger), Mass Spectrometry (Krause, E), Solution NMR (Schmieder)

Abstract: In contrast to protein O-phosphorylation, studying the function of the less frequent N- and S-phosphorylation events have lagged behind because they have chemical features that prevent their manipulation through standard synthetic and analytical methods. Here we report on the development of a chemoselective synthetic method to phosphorylate Cys side-chains in unprotected peptides. This approach makes use of a reaction between nucleophilic phosphites and electrophilic disulfides accessible by standard methods. We achieve the stereochemically defined phosphorylation of a Cys residue and verify the modification using electron-transfer higher-energy dissociation (EThcD) mass spectrometry. To demonstrate the use of the approach in resolving biological questions, we identify an endogenous Cys phosphorylation site in IICB(Glc), which is known to be involved in the carbohydrate uptake from the bacterial phosphotransferase system (PTS). This new chemical and analytical approach finally allows further investigating the functions and significance of Cys phosphorylation in a wide range of crucial cellular processes.

Intracellular repair of oxidation-damaged alpha-synuclein fails to target C-terminal modification sites
Binolfi, A., Limatola, A., Verzini, S., Kosten, J., Theillet, F. X., Rose, H. M., Bekei, B., Stuiver, M., van Rossum, M.; Selenko, P.
Nat Commun, 7:10251
(2016)

Tags: In-Cell NMR (Selenko)

Abstract: Cellular oxidative stress serves as a common denominator in many neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's disease. Here we use in-cell NMR spectroscopy to study the fate of the oxidation-damaged Parkinson's disease protein alpha-synuclein (alpha-Syn) in non-neuronal and neuronal mammalian cells. Specifically, we deliver methionine-oxidized, isotope-enriched alpha-Syn into cultured cells and follow intracellular protein repair by endogenous enzymes at atomic resolution. We show that N-terminal alpha-Syn methionines Met1 and Met5 are processed in a stepwise manner, with Met5 being exclusively repaired before Met1. By contrast, C-terminal methionines Met116 and Met127 remain oxidized and are not targeted by cellular enzymes. In turn, persisting oxidative damage in the C-terminus of alpha-Syn diminishes phosphorylation of Tyr125 by Fyn kinase, which ablates the necessary priming event for Ser129 modification by CK1. These results establish that oxidative stress can lead to the accumulation of chemically and functionally altered alpha-Syn in cells.

Reversible Opening of Intercellular Junctions of Intestinal Epithelial and Brain Endothelial Cells With Tight Junction Modulator Peptides
Bocsik(*), A., Walter(*), F. R., Gyebrovszki(*), A., Fulop(*), L., Blasig, I., Dabrowski, S., Otvos(*), F., Toth(*), A., Rakhely(*), G., Veszelka(*), S., Vastag(*), M., Szabo-Revesz(*), P.; Deli(*), M. A.
Journal of pharmaceutical sciences, 105:754-765
(2016)

Tags: Molecular Cell Physiology (Blasig, I.E.)

Abstract: The intercellular junctions restrict the free passage of hydrophilic compounds through the paracellular clefts. Reversible opening of the tight junctions of biological barriers is investigated as one of the ways to increase drug delivery to the systemic circulation or the central nervous system. Six peptides, ADT-6, HAV-6, C-CPE, 7-mer (FDFWITP, PN-78), AT-1002, and PN-159, acting on different integral membrane and linker junctional proteins were tested on Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cell line and a coculture model of the blood-brain barrier. All peptides tested in nontoxic concentrations showed a reversible tight junctions modulating effect and were effective to open the paracellular pathway for the marker molecules fluorescein and albumin. The change in the structure of cell-cell junctions was verified by immunostaining for occludin, claudin-4,-5, ZO-1, beta-catenin, and E-cadherin. Expression levels of occludin and claudins were measured in both models. We could demonstrate a selectivity of C-CPE, ADT-6, and HAV-6 peptides for epithelial cells and 7-mer and AT-1002 peptides for brain endothelial cells. PN-159 was the most effective modulator of junctional permeability in both models possibly acting via claudin-1 and -5. Our results indicate that these peptides can be effectively and selectively used as potential pharmaceutical excipients to improve drug delivery across biological barriers.

Page:  
Previous | 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, ... , 11 | Next
Export as:
BibTeX, XML

Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (FMP)
Campus Berlin-Buch
Robert-Roessle-Str. 10
13125 Berlin, Germany
+4930 94793 - 100 
+4930 94793 - 109 (Fax)
info(at)fmp-berlin.de

Like many sites, we use cookies to optimize the user's browsing experience. Data Protection OK