FMP Publications

Our publications are recorded in a searchable database since 2010, updates will be added regularly.

Year:  
All :: 2010, ... , 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017
Author:  
All :: (, A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W, X, Y, Z 
  
 
Preferences: 
References per page: Show keywords Show abstracts
References
Studying the Conformation of a Silaffin-Derived Pentalysine Peptide Embedded in Bioinspired Silica using Solution and Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Magic-Angle Spinning NMR
Geiger(*), Y., Gottlieb(*), H. E., Akbey, Ü., Oschkinat, H.; Goobes(*), G.
J Am Chem Soc, 138:5561-5567
(2016)

Tags: NMR-Supported Structural Biology (Oschkinat)

Abstract: Smart materials are created in nature at interfaces between biomolecules and solid materials. The ability to probe the structure of functional peptides that engineer biogenic materials at this heterogeneous setting can be facilitated tremendously by use of DNP-enhanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy. This sensitive NMR technique allows simple and quick measurements, often without the need for isotope enrichment. Here, it is used to characterize a pentalysine peptide, derived from a diatom's silaffin protein. The peptide accelerates the formation of bioinspired silica and gets embedded inside the material as it is formed. Two-dimensional DNP MAS NMR of the silica-bound peptide and solution NMR of the free peptide are used to derive its secondary structure in the two states and to pinpoint some subtle conformational changes that the peptide undergoes in order to adapt to the silica environment. In addition, interactions between abundant lysine residues and silica surface are identified, and proximity of other side chains to silica and to neighboring peptide molecules is discussed.

Disruption of Kcc2-dependent inhibition of olfactory bulb output neurons suggests its importance in odour discrimination
Gödde, K., Gschwend(*), O., Puchkov, D., Pfeffer, C. K., Carleton(*), A.; Jentsch, T. J.
Nat Commun, 7:12043
(2016)

Tags: Physiology and Pathology of Ion Transport (Jentsch), Cellular Imaging (Wiesner/Puchkov)

Abstract: Synaptic inhibition in the olfactory bulb (OB), the first relay station of olfactory information, is believed to be important for odour discrimination. We interfered with GABAergic inhibition of mitral and tufted cells (M/T cells), the principal neurons of the OB, by disrupting their potassium-chloride cotransporter 2 (Kcc2). Roughly, 70% of mice died around 3 weeks, but surviving mice appeared normal. In these mice, the resulting increase in the intracellular Cl(-) concentration nearly abolished GABA-induced hyperpolarization of mitral cells (MCs) and unexpectedly increased the number of perisomatic synapses on MCs. In vivo analysis of odorant-induced OB electrical activity revealed increased M/T cell firing rate, altered phasing of action potentials in the breath cycle and disrupted separation of odour-induced M/T cell activity patterns. Mice also demonstrated a severely impaired ability to discriminate chemically similar odorants or odorant mixtures. Our work suggests that precisely tuned GABAergic inhibition onto M/T cells is crucial for M/T cell spike pattern separation needed to distinguish closely similar odours.

AKAP18:PKA-RIIalpha structure reveals crucial anchor points for recognition of regulatory subunits of PKA
Götz, F., Roske(*), Y., Schulz(*), M. S., Autenrieth(*), K., Bertinetti(*), D., Faelber(*), K., Zühlke(*), K., Kreuchwig, A., Kennedy(*), E. J., Krause, G., Daumke(*), O., Herberg(*), F. W., Heinemann(*), U.; Klussmann(*), E.
Biochem J, 473:1881-1894
(2016)

Tags: Structural Bioinformatics and Protein Design (Krause, G.), Anchored Signaling (Klussmann)

Abstract: A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) interact with the dimerization/docking (D/D) domains of regulatory subunits of the ubiquitous protein kinase A (PKA). AKAPs tether PKA to defined cellular compartments establishing distinct pools to increase the specificity of PKA signalling. Here, we elucidated the structure of an extended PKA-binding domain of AKAP18beta bound to the D/D domain of the regulatory RIIalpha subunits of PKA. We identified three hydrophilic anchor points in AKAP18beta outside the core PKA-binding domain, which mediate contacts with the D/D domain. Such anchor points are conserved within AKAPs that bind regulatory RII subunits of PKA. We derived a different set of anchor points in AKAPs binding regulatory RI subunits of PKA. In vitro and cell-based experiments confirm the relevance of these sites for the interaction of RII subunits with AKAP18 and of RI subunits with the RI-specific smAKAP. Thus we report a novel mechanism governing interactions of AKAPs with PKA. The sequence specificity of each AKAP around the anchor points and the requirement of these points for the tight binding of PKA allow the development of selective inhibitors to unequivocally ascribe cellular functions to the AKAP18-PKA and other AKAP-PKA interactions.

RIM-binding protein 2 regulates release probability by fine-tuning calcium channel localization at murine hippocampal synapses
Grauel(*), M. K., Maglione, M., Reddy-Alla(*), S., Willmes(*), C. G., Brockmann(*), M. M., Trimbuch(*), T., Rosenmund(*), T., Pangalos(*), M., Vardar(*), G., Stumpf(*), A., Walter, A. M., Rost(*), B. R., Eickholt(*), B. J., Haucke, V., Schmitz(*), D., Sigrist(*), S. J.; Rosenmund(*), C.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A, 113:11615-11620
(2016)

Tags: Molecular Pharmacology and Cell Biology (Haucke), Molecular and Theoretical Neuroscience (Walter)

Abstract: The tight spatial coupling of synaptic vesicles and voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (CaVs) ensures efficient action potential-triggered neurotransmitter release from presynaptic active zones (AZs). Rab-interacting molecule-binding proteins (RIM-BPs) interact with Ca2+ channels and via RIM with other components of the release machinery. Although human RIM-BPs have been implicated in autism spectrum disorders, little is known about the role of mammalian RIM-BPs in synaptic transmission. We investigated RIM-BP2-deficient murine hippocampal neurons in cultures and slices. Short-term facilitation is significantly enhanced in both model systems. Detailed analysis in culture revealed a reduction in initial release probability, which presumably underlies the increased short-term facilitation. Superresolution microscopy revealed an impairment in CaV2.1 clustering at AZs, which likely alters Ca2+ nanodomains at release sites and thereby affects release probability. Additional deletion of RIM-BP1 does not exacerbate the phenotype, indicating that RIM-BP2 is the dominating RIM-BP isoform at these synapses.

Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Enhanced MAS NMR Spectroscopy for Structural Analysis of HIV-1 Protein Assemblies
Gupta(*), R., Lu(*), M., Hou(*), G., Caporini(*), M. A., Rosay(*), M., Maas(*), W., Struppe(*), J., Suiter(*), C., Ahn(*), J., Byeon(*), I. J., Franks, W. T., Orwick-Rydmark, M., Bertarello(*), A., Oschkinat, H., Lesage(*), A., Pintacuda(*), G., Gronenborn(*), A. M.; Polenova(*), T.
J Phys Chem B, 120:329-339
(2016)

Tags: NMR-Supported Structural Biology (Oschkinat)

Abstract: Mature infectious HIV-1 virions contain conical capsids composed of CA protein, generated by the proteolytic cleavage cascade of the Gag polyprotein, termed maturation. The mechanism of capsid core formation through the maturation process remains poorly understood. We present DNP-enhanced MAS NMR studies of tubular assemblies of CA and Gag CA-SP1 maturation intermediate and report 20-64-fold sensitivity enhancements due to DNP at 14.1 T. These sensitivity enhancements enabled direct observation of spacer peptide 1 (SP1) resonances in CA-SP1 by dipolar-based correlation experiments, unequivocally indicating that the SP1 peptide is unstructured in assembled CA-SP1 at cryogenic temperatures, corroborating our earlier results. Furthermore, the dependence of DNP enhancements and spectral resolution on magnetic field strength (9.4-18.8 T) and temperature (109-180 K) was investigated. Our results suggest that DNP-based measurements could potentially provide residue-specific dynamics information by allowing for the extraction of the temperature dependence of the anisotropic tensorial or relaxation parameters. With DNP, we were able to detect multiple well-resolved isoleucine side-chain conformers; unique intermolecular correlations across two CA molecules; and functionally relevant conformationally disordered states such as the 14-residue SP1 peptide, none of which are visible at ambient temperatures. The detection of isolated conformers and intermolecular correlations can provide crucial constraints for structure determination of these assemblies. Overall, our results establish DNP-based MAS NMR spectroscopy as an excellent tool for the characterization of HIV-1 assemblies.

Cellular Cations Control Conformational Switching of Inositol Pyrophosphate Analogues
Hager(*), A., Wu(*), M., Wang(*), H., Brown, N. W., Jr., Shears(*), S. B., Veiga(*), N.; Fiedler, D.
Chemistry, 22:12406-12414
(2016)

Tags: Chemical Biology I (Fiedler)

Abstract: The inositol pyrophosphate messengers (PP-InsPs) are emerging as an important class of cellular regulators. These molecules have been linked to numerous biological processes, including insulin secretion and cancer cell migration, but how they trigger such a wide range of cellular responses has remained unanswered in many cases. Here, we show that the PP-InsPs exhibit complex speciation behaviour and propose that a unique conformational switching mechanism could contribute to their multifunctional effects. We synthesised non-hydrolysable bisphosphonate analogues and crystallised the analogues in complex with mammalian PPIP5K2 kinase. Subsequently, the bisphosphonate analogues were used to investigate the protonation sequence, metal-coordination properties, and conformation in solution. Remarkably, the presence of potassium and magnesium ions enabled the analogues to adopt two different conformations near physiological pH. Understanding how the intrinsic chemical properties of the PP-InsPs can contribute to their complex signalling outputs will be essential to elucidate their regulatory functions.

Intradomain Allosteric Network Modulates Calcium Affinity of the C-Type Lectin Receptor Langerin
Hanske(*), J., Aleksic(*), S., Ballaschk, M., Jurk(*), M., Shanina(*), E., Beerbaum, M., Schmieder, P., Keller(*), B. G.; Rademacher(*), C.
J Am Chem Soc, 138:12176-12186
(2016)

Tags: Solution NMR (Schmieder)

Abstract: Antigen uptake and processing by innate immune cells is crucial to initiate the immune response. Therein, the endocytic C-type lectin receptors serve as pattern recognition receptors, detecting pathogens by their glycan structures. Herein, we studied the carbohydrate recognition domain of Langerin, a C-type lectin receptor involved in the host defense against viruses such as HIV and influenza as well as bacteria and fungi. Using a combination of nuclear magnetic resonance and molecular dynamics simulations, we unraveled the molecular determinants underlying cargo capture and release encoded in the receptor architecture. Our findings revealed receptor dynamics over several time scales associated with binding and release of the essential cofactor Ca(2+) controlled by the coupled motions of two loops. Applying mutual information theory and site-directed mutagenesis, we identified an allosteric intradomain network that modulates the Ca(2+) affinity depending on the pH, thereby promoting fast ligand release.

SORLA regulates calpain-dependent degradation of synapsin
Hartl(*), D., Nebrich(*), G., Klein(*), O., Stephanowitz, H., Krause, E.; Rohe(*), M.
Alzheimers Dement, 12:952-963
(2016)

Tags: Mass Spectrometry (Krause, E.)

Abstract: INTRODUCTION: Sorting-related receptor with A-type repeats (SORLA) is an intracellular sorting receptor in neurons and a major risk factor for Alzheimer disease. METHODS: Here, we performed global proteome analyses in the brain of SORLA-deficient mice followed by biochemical and histopathologic studies to identify novel neuronal pathways affected by receptor dysfunction. RESULTS: We demonstrate that the lack of SORLA results in accumulation of phosphorylated synapsins in cortex and hippocampus. We propose an underlying molecular mechanism by demonstrating that SORLA interacts with phosphorylated synapsins through 14-3-3 adaptor proteins to deliver synapsins to calpain-mediated proteolytic degradation. DISCUSSION: Our results suggest a novel function for SORLA which is in control of synapsin degradation, potentially impacting on synaptic vesicle endocytosis and/or exocytosis.

Hypothalamic feedforward inhibition of thalamocortical network controls arousal and consciousness
Herrera(*), C. G., Cadavieco, M. C., Jego(*), S., Ponomarenko, A., Korotkova, T.; Adamantidis(*), A.
Nat Neurosci, 19:290-298
(2016)

Tags: Behavioral Neurodynamics (Korotkova/Ponomarenko)

Abstract: During non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, synchronous synaptic activity in the thalamocortical network generates predominantly low-frequency oscillations (<4 Hz) that are modulated by inhibitory inputs from the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN). Whether TRN cells integrate sleep-wake signals from subcortical circuits remains unclear. We found that GABA neurons from the lateral hypothalamus (LHGABA) exert a strong inhibitory control over TRN GABA neurons (TRNGABA). We found that optogenetic activation of this circuit recapitulated state-dependent changes of TRN neuron activity in behaving mice and induced rapid arousal during NREM, but not REM, sleep. During deep anesthesia, activation of this circuit induced sustained cortical arousal. In contrast, optogenetic silencing of LHGABA-TRNGABA transmission increased the duration of NREM sleep and amplitude of delta (1-4 Hz) oscillations. Collectively, these results demonstrate that TRN cells integrate subcortical arousal inputs selectively during NREM sleep and may participate in sleep intensity.

Stabilization of bacterially expressed erythropoietin by single site-specific introduction of short branched PEG chains at naturally occurring glycosylation sites
Hoffmann(*), E., Streichert, K., Nischan, N., Seitz(*), C., Brunner(*), T., Schwagerus, S., Hackenberger, C. P.; Rubini(*), M.
Mol Biosyst, 12:1750-1755
(2016)

Tags: Chemische Biologie II (Hackenberger)

Abstract: The covalent attachment of polyethylene glycol (PEG) to therapeutic proteins can improve their physicochemical properties. In this work we utilized the non-natural amino acid p-azidophenylalanine (pAzF) in combination with the chemoselective Staudinger-phosphite reaction to install branched PEG chains to recombinant unglycosylated erythropoietin (EPO) at each single naturally occurring glycosylation site. PEGylation with two short 750 or 2000 Da PEG units at positions 24, 38, or 83 significantly decreased unspecific aggregation and proteolytic degradation while biological activity in vitro was preserved or even increased in comparison to full-glycosylated EPO. This site-specific bioconjugation approach permits to analyse the impact of PEGylation at single positions. These results represent an important step towards the engineering of site-specifically modified EPO variants from bacterial expression with increased therapeutic efficacy.

Page:  
Previous | 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, ... , 11 | Next
Export as:
BibTeX, XML